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Thread: The Long Arm

  1. #1
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    Watching "The Long Arm" the other day on TV I was struck by the truly stunning photography. Does anyone know who the cinematographer was and what other movies he (I’m assuming it was a he) shot?



    The main reason that I love British movies from this period (and believe me I’m not a fan of British movies in general, I’m with Truffaut on that) is the fantastic b/w photography, the rain slicked streets, the leaden skies and the seedy drinking establishments. Britain lent itself so well to the conventions of the crime genre. Films such as “Night and the City” and “Hell is a City” are good examples. Black and white is far superior to colour in everyway.



    On a related topic does anyone know of any movies from this period 50s and 60s that were shot, or have scenes shot, in my hometown of Glasgow. I would have loved to see the city back when it was more (how should I put it?) atmospheric. I like a bit of urban blight. These days its mostly coffee houses and Italian clothing stores, and I am outraged.





    C

  2. #2
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Carterh:



    On a related topic does anyone know of any movies from this period 50s and 60s that were shot, or have scenes shot, in my hometown of Glasgow. I would have loved to see the city back when it was more (how should I put it?) atmospheric. I like a bit of urban blight. These days its mostly coffee houses and Italian clothing stores, and I am outraged.





    C
    THE MAGGIE (1954) was partly shot in Glasgow.

  3. #3
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Carterh:



    On a related topic does anyone know of any movies from this period 50s and 60s that were shot, or have scenes shot, in my hometown of Glasgow. I would have loved to see the city back when it was more (how should I put it?) atmospheric. I like a bit of urban blight. These days its mostly coffee houses and Italian clothing stores, and I am outraged.





    C
    There are quite a few listed on the IMDb



    That doesn't list every film or TV series made there of course - there is no mention of Rab C. Nesbitt :)



    Steve

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Not from that era, but Small Faces (1996) is my fave view of inner-city Glasgow.

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    DB7:

    Not from that era, but Small Faces (1996) is my fave view of inner-city Glasgow.
    Small Faces is a superb film, around at the same time as; and overshadowed by; Trainspotting (Also a superb film)



    I am kicking myself as I missed Long Arm the other day, I haven't seen it for years. frown

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    Thanks I'll check out "The Maggie". I've heard of it, but never actually seen the movie. I'm aware that a few more recent movies were shot in Glasgow including "Gregory's Girl 1 and 2" "Small Faces", "The Little Vampire", "The House of Mirth" "Heavenly Creatures" (with a scene shot outside the office block I worked in at the time)"Orphans" "My Name Is Joe" (with my mate's sister in a small role)and some scenes from "Trainspotting". The last, although shot in Edinburgh, includes a couple of scenes that take place in Glasgow including the Begbie fight scene that was shot in the pub were I worked as a student. Didn't care for the movie though. There have of course been numerous TV series.



    Has anyone ever seen "Deathwatch" shot in Glasgow with Harvey Keitel and I think Harry Dean Stanton?



    C

  7. #7
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    The cinematography on The Long Arm was Gordon Dines. Born 1911,he also worked some ofthe George Formby films in the 40's,Nicholas Nickleby,The Blue Lamp,Train of Events,I Believe in You,The Cruel Sea,The Maggie,The Colditz Story and The Long Arm,plus others.

    Now having read of those films he made,it's obvious he was a bit of a master of black & white photography and the dour effect it promoted.

    I also liked The Long Arm for the meticulous detective work conducted by the great Jack Hawkins and its humour.

    I hope this is of help.

    Marky B

  8. #8
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    Thanks Marky very helpful.



    C

  9. #9
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    In my opinion, surely one of the very best British black and white crime dramas ever made (and now seemingly forgotten and neglected) was PAYROLL, made in 1961 and starring Michael Craig, Francoise Prevost and Billie Whitelaw. Filmed on location in and around Newcastle-upon-Tyne, but oddly, without a Geordie accent to be heard anywhere. I still recall the striking poster, with a hand clutching a bundle of pound notes and the punchline: "Brilliant! Brutal! Torn From Tonight's Headlines!

  10. #10
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    Yes I'm a fan of heist / caper movies and "Payroll" is one of the best.



    C

  11. #11
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    Early on in The Long Arm there is a domestic scene with Jack Hawkins, his wife and son. The son asks his father when they're going to catch up with the gang that robbed a cinema querying, whether he's working on the case. Hawkins can't convince him he isn't on the case. The boy becomes excited but is rebuked by his mother pointing out that a policeman at the scene was killed.

    Did anyone else notice this? Is it a cheeky reference to the earlier Ealing film The Blue Lamp or just coincidence?

    Can anyone think of any other cases of references in movies to other movies?

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    There wasn't a policeman killed in The Long Arm. It was a workman (Ian Bannen) who tried to stop the getaway car after a factory raid.

  13. #13
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    Maybe my post wasn't clear. I'm not saying there was a policeman killed in The Long Arm. What I'm saying is that there is a scene early on in the movie where Jack Hawkins and his family are discussing a case where a policeman has been shot and killed. Hope this clarifies.

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    In "CLOCKWORK ORANGE" Alex buys a record and on the counter is a poster advertising Kubricks "2001". Also (I know its American) "DIRTY HARRY" has Eastwoods "PLAY MISTY FOR ME" showing at a cinema in the background during the bank shootout.

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    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Bobj:

    What I'm saying is that there is a scene early on in the movie where Jack Hawkins and his family are discussing a case where a policeman has been shot and killed. Hope this clarifies.
    I thought it was that the son had heard of Bannen's death then excitably quizzed his father as to whether or not he was on the case. Hawkin's then gets scolded by his wife for glamorizing the job.



    I'll have to watch it again sometime as my memory is probably wrong.



    The Blue Lamp is a bit romanticized whereas The Long Arm is more semi-documentary.

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    The conversation takes place in Hawkins first scene. The family are having breakfast and his son wishes his father had been at the shooting of the policeman because he would have caught the murderer. After all he had not had a decent case since Maltese Eddie.

  17. #17
    Member Country: United States harkin's Avatar
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    BobJ - You're right.



    The breakfast scene in 'The Long Arm' (known to alot of us in the US as 'The Third Key') contains the discussion about the first policeman on the scene of a crime who was killed. This exchange is set up to convey Sup. Halliday's wife's apprehension over the son's growing interst in solving crimes. She worries enough about her husband every day and does not wish to have same trouble from son.



    This is one of my cherished video tapes. I recorded it from WGN Chicago during the 1980s and would love to have a copy on DVD. I always wonder about possible deleted shots/scenes. After finding a VHS copy of 'The Cruel Sea' I was happily surprised with about 5 min of extra footage cut for the broadcast.

  18. #18
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    Just watched this again, I've had it for quite a while but felt that there wasn't much reason to re-watch it as only a few have the magic to stand another viewing (honourable exceptions include The Man in the White Suit, Last Holiday, Genevieve, The 39 Steps (Kenneth More version) many John Mills and Alistair Sim vehicles to name a few).

    Thoroughly enjoyed it, sharp and with a field of familiar faces - many giving solid well rounded performances with ease, this had me engaged from the first 5 minutes. How I wish any number of current film 'stars' would have the presence and believability of the likes of Hawkins and his peers, particularly those in products aimed mainly for American consumption Ryan Reynolds anyone? Ashton Kutcher, Jack Black and the truly awful Nicholas Cage. One dimensional. All the time - yet they're making the money while I'm doing 9 to 5.

    Anyway, when 5 minutes in, I was taken by the pub next door to the 'scene of the crime' in Long Acre The Sugar Loaf got me thinking where the scene was shot. A quick google revealed The Crown and Sugarloaf but it was off Fleet street and the buildings didn't fit the scene. Fortunately in one shot there are two tea rooms Drury Cafe & Drury Teas which helped to place the buildings off Drury Lane in Great Queen Street. Stone & Co is now a itsu eatery and the Sugar Loaf is an O'Neil's pub - and not much lauded on their website as I couldn't find it listed.

    Great film which I must remember to watch again without the passing of quite so many years.

  19. #19
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    Raymond, the 'Reelstreets' website does feature Great Queen Street as seen in The Long Arm' but apparently without an exact reference to the premises.

    http://www.****************/index.ph...g_arm&Itemid=3

    However Reelstreets only catalogue GQS as very murkily depicted in the film or otherwise an ultra-modern comparison.

    From the venerated RIBA site here's the same junction photographed only 20 years earlier to commemorate the Freemason's Hall opposite. Is the bread and cake van on the left in the correct place almost? Might give readers a clearer view of the location in question

    http://www.ribapix.com/image.php?i=6...&ref=RIBA25136

    Viewers should be able to enlarge/decrease the photo size by clicking on it.

  20. #20
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    Yes Rick that's the spot. In fact O'Neills' current premises occupy the building with the pitched roof as seen on the extreme left in your image and the next building further left again (but out of shot in your image). The next building further on the left are the premises of Stone & Co (Long Acre) in the film.

    I've attached a recent image from Google maps street view (if we are allowed to do so? Apologies if not.) which shows the pub painted in a vivid blue and the current occupiers of 'Stone & Co'. If the attached image doesn't 'stick ' or breaks rules then anyone comfortable enough with a PC to access this site can view this on the aforementioned product's street view.

    I was struck by how clean and presentable GQS was in your picture, I wonder if this was tidied up for the event? It reflected an almost civic pride that is almost completely absent in these modern times. Progress!!
    Great Queen Street The Long Arm.jpg
    Last edited by RaymondDelauny; 25-03-13 at 11:53 PM.

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