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Thread: cowboy films

  1. #1
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    i love all the cowboy films of the 50s my question is why did the cowboys allways get on and off the left hand side of the horse. thank you very much.

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    Never thought about that before!



    Would love to have some lesser known cowboys vs injuns films on dvd , seems to be a genre that they have left out

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    If you look on Amazon or ebay you will find a box of 20 old westerns for about 10.I bought a box of 20 Hopalong Cassidys with my favourite sidekick "Gabby"Hayes.Yur durn tuttin.

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    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='old movies']i love all the cowboy films of the 50s my question is why did the cowboys allways get on and off the left hand side of the horse. thank you very much.


    It's not just cowboys, everyone does (except maybe left handers)

    I think it's because that's the easiest way when you're wearing a sword (on your left hand side) so you don't get tangled up in the sword as you mount



    Steve

  5. #5
    Senior Member Country: Scotland julian_craster's Avatar
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    A technical question regarding large wagon wheels in westerns....



    When the film is projected, why do the wheels appear to go in reverse in some movies (but not in others....) ???



    Has anybody else noticed this ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    It's called the stroboscopic effect and, to understand it, you will have to have in your mind a slowed down image of the moving spoked wheel. The camera shoots at 24 frames per second and, if the distance travelled by each spoke as the wheel turns is exactly the distance between one spoke and the next and exactly the time between one frame being exposed, the camera shutter closing and opening and the next frame being exposed, the wheel will appear to be stationary, although the wagon is moving.



    If the distance the spoke moves is three quarters of the distance between one spoke and the next while the frames are being exposed, then the wheel will appear to be revolving anti-clockwise, or forwards. But conversely, if the distance between one spoke and the next while the frames are being exposed is only a quarter of the distance between one spoke and the next, the wheels will appear to be travelling clockwise, or backwards. It sounds a lot more complicated than it is.

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    Whether a wheel going clockwise is backwards or forwards, depends on whether the wagon is moving from right to left of vice versa

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: United States torinfan's Avatar
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    It's the easiest way to mount a horse, the way I understand it.



    Same thing with a bicycle. I always mount my bicycle from the left side, too, never the right side.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    name='Hugo']Whether a wheel going clockwise is backwards or forwards, depends on whether the wagon is moving from right to left of vice versa




    You're correct, Hugo. When I was typing that, I had in mind a wagon that was moving from right to left across the screen.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    I love westerns, good thing too as, using Freesat, I have access to the cheaper end of the movie market only. Not only do the wagon wheels go backwards and they all mount their horses the same way, the love interests are always old enough to be grandparents. What the hell they tell a ripping yarn with no blood and gore, you know exactly what the score is, their clothes tell you the good and the bad, the templates are applied and formats followed. I have most of John Wayne's efforts and I like Randolph Scott. I think all the support artists are a tight band as they pop up everywhere. Nice post.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    A few weeks ago, I had the good fortune to come across an eBay UK seller selling copies on DVD of a few Westerns I last saw as a young boy in the 1950's and that I thought I would never see again, as they've never been officially released on either video or DVD and never been shown on television in the UK.



    These were George Montgomery in Canyon River (1956); Joel McCrea in The First Texan (1956); Ben Cooper in Duel at Apache Wells (1957) and Rory Calhoun in The Hired Gun (1957). Although these were all CinemaScope films, they were in pan and scan on the DVD's, but it was better than not being able to see them at all and both picture and sound on them are very good indeed. The recordings probably originated on an American cable channel such as Encore Westerns.



    A good job I bought them when I did, though, as, when eBay found out that the seller was selling unauthorised copies, they suspended his account...even though he was selling the DVD's for only around 1 each.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    name='darrenburnfan']A few weeks ago, I had the good fortune to come across an eBay UK seller selling copies on DVD of a few Westerns I last saw as a young boy in the 1950's and that I thought I would never see again, as they've never been officially released on either video or DVD and never been shown on television in the UK.



    These were George Montgomery in Canyon River (1956); Joel McCrea in The First Texan (1956); Ben Cooper in Duel at Apache Wells (1957) and Rory Calhoun in The Hired Gun (1957). Although these were all CinemaScope films, they were in pan and scan on the DVD's, but it was better than not being able to see them at all and both picture and sound on them are very good indeed. The recordings probably originated on an American cable channel such as Encore Westerns.



    A good job I bought them when I did, though, as, when eBay found out that the seller was selling unauthorised copies, they suspended his account...even though he was selling the DVD's for only around 1 each.


    Ebay are really cracking down on sellers of dvdr's of films. There are several really good sites out there that specialise in hard to find and vintage westerns. This is a good one ....



    LINK: CowboyPal, Home of the Silver Screen Cowboys



    You can also pick up loads on ioffer ....



    LINK: Classic B western movies on dvd!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links, Batman. I will check them out.

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    That's an interesting question about clambering aboard a horse, luvvies! I go motorbiking with largish groups, and I can't think of one soul who gets on from the 'wrong' side!



    The same goes for putting on your trollies and trews, chaps: I'll bet nearly all you on this forum put your right leg in first! Check it out in the morning!

  15. #15
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Most people don't mount a horse from the left side.

    Most people call a cab



    I've Googled around for some explanations and most of them, like me, think it goes back to when people carried swords



    Steve

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    they tell a ripping yarn with no blood and gore, you know exactly what the score is, their clothes tell you the good and the bad, the templates are applied and formats followed


    Well that depends what westerns you watch - Leone, Peckinpah and the like (including even Ford to some extent in, say, The Searchers) tell it a bit different from that.

  17. #17
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    Hi.

    I believe it is safer to mount that way. I may be wrong, but I am sure in the mists of time within my memory bank, there is somewhere someone saying there is less chance of you being kicked by the horse if you mount it that way.



    Alan French.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: England woody123's Avatar
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    Don't think the sword thing is the reason.If you think about it,swords are always worn on the left side as it would be impossible for a right handed person to draw from the right side of the body.It would be difficult to draw a left-slung sword with you're right hand as you were mounting from the left side(you'd probably do yourself and the horse a world of mischeif).Someone explained the reason on a tv programme a couple of months ago.They reckoned that as you grasp the pommel of the saddle,reins already in your left hand,you take hold of a tuft of the mane which shows the horse who's boss,and makes it stand still.The programme was a kid's show where the presenter was about to make a clown of himself.

    Surely someone out there has a relative who rides and can give the gospel on this.

    "evening all"

  19. #19
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    If you are right handed mounting a horse (or a bike) from the left is the logical thing to do because you are using you right leg and arm to grab onto the horse.

  20. #20
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='m35541']If you are right handed mounting a horse (or a bike) from the left is the logical thing to do because you are using you right leg and arm to grab onto the horse.


    Most people don't grab the horse with their leg

    They just swing it over







    Steve

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