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  • Real Estate are a modern band who hail from Ridgewood, New Jersey, and from their excellent second LP Days (Domino 2011) this is the delightful Easy.

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    • This classic needs no introduction. The most played song on U.S. TV and radio, You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ (Philles 7" 1964) by The Righteous Brothers, with a superb arrangement/production from Phil Spector.

      Last edited by agutterfan; 27th January 2018, 10:33 AM.

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      • TV On The Radio are a modern American rock band hailing from Brooklyn, New York. This is Halfway Home, which opens their third LP Dear Science (North America: Interscope Worldwide: 4AD 2008)

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        • Lastly, a couple of post-punk Manchester classics from the same band, different names, at the start of their respective careers at Factory Records. First, Joy Division with Digital, from Factory' s first record release, the double-E.P. package A Factory Sample (Factory 2X7" 1979 cat no. FAC3) and then the last song they ever wrote, In A Lonely Place, released by New Order as the B-side of their debut single Ceremony (Factory 7" 1981 cat no. FAC33). Enjoy. Until next week ...


          Last edited by agutterfan; 30th January 2018, 01:30 PM.

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          • Originally posted by wadsy View Post

            That line up of Fleetwood Mac was the best ever! Well that's my opinion anyway!!..........& it is live!!
            Yes absolutely agree that it was the best ever F Mac lineup - when I said that it wasn't live - I meant that it had been prerecorded,so it had been played live by the bands and then that recording was being played at the gig so although the bands were 'miming' - it was 'live' from the previous day (or whenever the recording was done).

            rgds baz

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            • Bernie Marsden & Micky Moody - Till The Day I Die (acoustic)
              Lovely melodic guitar from the 2 original Whitesnake guitarists

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              • Edward G
                Edward G commented
                Editing a comment
                BVS,
                Many thanks for this - I hadn't seen it before and what a great performance. Another offshoot from the expansive Deep Purple family tree the early Whitesnake material was fabulous.

            • We start today with an artist completely new to me. Keaton Henson (http://keatonhenson.com/), is an English folk rock musician, visual artist and poet from London, with You Don't Know How Lucky You Are, from his debut LP (he's released six) Dear (Motive Sounds Recordings 2010). Hope you like it.

              Last edited by agutterfan; 3rd February 2018, 10:27 AM.

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              • Next up, a classic from Woking's finest The Jam, with the official video for their excellent standalone single When You're Young (Polydor 7" 1979).

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                • Our historical trip through the music of Joni Mitchell brings us to her classic fourth LP Blue (Reprise 1970), and the majesty that is A Case Of You, featuring that rarely used instrument, the dulcimer. Fantastic lyrics.

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                  • Another classic that's often covered, but rarely better than here, the original version of No Regrets (Elektra 7" 1968) by the composer himself, Tom Rush, from his sixth LP, the classic The Circle Game (Elektra 1968). This is the original promotional film.

                    Last edited by agutterfan; 3rd February 2018, 10:36 AM.

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                    • We finish today with a couple from France's finest, the drop dead gorgeous Françoise Hardy. First, her single Je Changerais D'Avis (Vogue 7" 1966), then appropriately for the season we end with a BBC TV appearance of her singing Song of Winter, from her third English-language LP One-Nine-Seven-Zero (United Artists 1969). That LP is long out of print but you can find it and the 1972 follow up on Midnight Blues Paris London 1968-72 (Ace Records 2013), which I recently purchased. Dedicated to former Britmovie member and Françoise Hardy fan Sgt. Sunshine, who doesn't seem to have migrated to the new site. Until next week ..


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                      • [QUOTE=agutterfan;n53524]Another classic that's often covered, but rarely better than here, the original version of No Regrets (Elektra 7" 1968) by the composer himself, Tom Rush
                        [QUOTE]
                        Nice
                        But I would probably (respectfully) argue that the Walker Bros version is hard to beat

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                        • agutterfan
                          agutterfan commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I agree with you. As covers go easily the best (note the use of the word rarely). But how many people think The Walker Brothers wrote it?

                      • The late great Alvin Lee (Ten Years After) became known as the fastest guitarist due to his style with TYA,but he was actually a really talented musician and singer - he teamed up with american gospel singer Mylon Levevre in 1973 and the clip below is them live in the Rainbow Room London,on stage with alvin are
                        Boz Burrell (King Crimson/Bad Co), Steve Winwood, Ian Wallace (King Crimson et al), Tim Hinkley, Mike Patto (spooky tooth) and Jim Capaldi (traffic).

                        So Alvin Lee playing semi acoustic country rock/gospel

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                        • agutterfan commented
                          Yesterday, 01:08 PM
                          I agree with you. As covers go easily the best (note the use of the word rarely). But how many people think The Walker Brothers wrote it?
                          Absolutely - the perennial problem for the Singer/Songwriter when somebody does a really popular cover of one of their songs and their own version gets completely overshadowed.

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                          • A Track that has always stayed with me' Released on 16 October 1982 in Commemoration of The Beatles 20th Anniversary at EMI'.

                            The Beatlesque/Lennon overtures are Obvious but tastefully done' The Band was formed in the early 80's by Brothers Graham and Steven Dye' Joined here by Mark Gilmour' Brother of the Pink Floyd's David.





                             

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