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  • We start today with Hampshire-born band The Clientele, and the amazing narrative song Losing Haringey, from their second original LP Strange Geometry (Pointy 2005).

    Last edited by agutterfan; 13th March 2018, 08:49 AM.

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    • Next up, Joni Mitchell's classic brilliant seventh LP The Hissing Of Summer Lawns (Asylum 1975). Despite being one of the greatest LPs of the 70s, contemporary critics disliked it, especially rock critics who were a bit sniffy about her use of jazz musicians & tropes for the music, unbelievably one even complained about the LP's 'awful' title! For me it's easily her best LP, not a weak track among them, so it's hard to select just one. Since I've posted a couple before, here's Edith and the Kingpin. Like all the songs on the LP her lyrics had reached an effortless majesty. The line "Women he has taken grow old too soon, he tilts their tired faces gently to the spoon" is fantastic, and sadly ironic as shortly after this LP Joni would succumb to cocaine addiction.

      Last edited by agutterfan; 24th February 2018, 10:50 AM.

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      • And now for something modern. Skeleton Hands (https://skeletonhands.bandcamp.com/ and http://www.skeletonhands.net/ ) are a dark wave duo from Cincinnati Ohio who are clearly fans of 80s electro. This is Hollow , from their four-track E.P. Flood Spell (Race Car Productions CD 2017).

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        • Next up the sonic brilliance of New York's Sonic Youth, and Beauty Lies In The Eye, from their brilliant fourth LP Sister (SST 1987), which is where I discovered them. SST were an important indie U.S. label, promoting punk, no wave and hardcore bands, an important counter-cultural movement against the bland, crushing yuppie conformity of Reaganite America.

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          • "Some days you waste your life away. These times I find no words to say"

            We finish today with two tracks from the debut LPs of Joy Division and their successor New Order. Disorder comes from Unknown Pleasures (Factory 1979 cat no. FACT10) whilst The Him (a reference to the fictional rock band in the works of J G Ballard) comes from Movement (Factory 1981 cat no. FACT50). Until next week ...



            "I've got the spirit, don't lose the feeling"
            Last edited by agutterfan; 24th February 2018, 11:06 AM.

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            • Originally posted by agutterfan View Post
              Next up, Joni Mitchell's classic brilliant seventh LP The Hissing Of Summer Lawns (Asylum 1975). Despite being one of the greatest LPs of the 70s, contemporary critics disliked it, especially rock critics who were a bit sniffy about her use of jazz musicians & tropes for the music, unbelievably one even complained about the LP's 'awful' title! For me it's easily her best LP, not a weak track among them, so it's hard to select just one. Since I've posted a couple before, here's Edith and the Kingpin. Like all the songs on the LP her lyrics had reached an effortless majesty. The line "Women he has taken grow old too soon, he tilts their tired faces gently to the spoon" is fantastic, and sadly ironic as shortly after this LP Joni would succumb to cocaine addiction.

              I have a JM bootleg featuring demos of (mostly) Hissing... tracks, called The Seeding Of Summer Lawns. Cassette-origin, I think...

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              • Bill Fay was an English pianist singer/songwriter who only released one single and two LPs in the early 70s before being dropped from his record label who weren't prepared to release his third. He wouldn't release an LP of new material until 2014. This is Be Not So Fearful, from his debut LP Bill Fay (Deram 1970).

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                • Next, Joni Mitchell and the all-time classic Amelia. Many people might have thought it would be difficult to follow up the classic 1975 LP The Hissing Of Summer Lawns, but Joni did with Hejira (Asylum 1976), her most personal LP. Written after a series of long car journeys, Joni has said that anyone could have written her songs previously but only she could have written these songs, even though this references famous aviatrix Amelia Earhart. As Joni said "I was thinking of Amelia Earhart and addressing it from one solo pilot to another ... sort of reflecting on the cost of being a woman and having something you must do.". I don't know why I find lines like "I dreamed of 747s over geometric farms" so moving but I do.

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                  • Still Corners are a London dream pop musical duo consisting of songwriter/producer Greg Hughes and vocalist Tessa Murray. This is The Trip, which opens their second LP Strange Pleasures (Sub Pop 2013).

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                    • The Superimposers are a modern British pop trio (https://wonderfulsound.bandcamp.com/...-superimposers) and this is the glorious Seeing Is Believing (Little League 7" 2005) from their debut LP The Superimposers (Little League 2005).

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                      • Jade Hexagram were a Welsh band who moved to London and recorded some great demos in 1967 that incredibly never got released by any record label. This is the groovy Great Shadowy Strange. Another good reason for posting this song is that there's a great story about this group. On their 1967 tour of Sweden, when they played Göteborg they tried to persuade a female fan to go topless on stage. Unfortunately for them, she stripped completely, even more unfortunately she turned out to be the daughter of the mayor of Göteborg. They were deported the very next day. Ah, the sixties, don't you just love 'em. Then we finish with one of the more bizarre B-sides of 1967, Listen to The Sky by Sands, which was released on the flip-side of the Bee Gees cover Mrs. Gillespie's Refrigerator (Reaction 7" 1967). Just in case you don't get the message, the portentous musical ending (listen all the way through) will show you why people of 1967 were urged to listen to the skies. Enjoy. Until next week ...


                        Last edited by agutterfan; 3rd March 2018, 10:49 AM.

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                        • Currently nearing the end of a Warners promo CD from the way back, featuring artistes as diverse as REM, David Byrne, Tori Amos and Shane MacGowan

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                          • Calexico (http://www.casadecalexico.com/) are a Tex-Mex band hailing from Tucson Arizona, and we start today's musical selection with two most bodacious songs from them. Firstly, Stray, from their second LP The Black Light (Quarterstick 1998), then Quattro (World Drifts In), from their fourth LP, the classic Feast of Fire (Quarterstick 2003).


                            Last edited by agutterfan; 10th March 2018, 10:25 AM.

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                            • Our historical journey through the career of Joni Mitchell reaches her ninth studio LP, Don Juan's Reckless Daughter (Asylum 2XLP 1977). This double album was often loose, improvised, and experimental. Though like all double albums a bit indulgent, still the best songs are amazing, and I salute such an established artist defying record label and audience expectations. From an embarrassment of riches (check out Paprika Plains) here's Dreamland. Enjoy.

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                              • Leeds 60s band The Outer Limits total released output was four singles, only three of which were released while they existed. This the first, Just One More Chance b/w Help Me Please (Deram 7" 1967), both sides are posted here, I must admit I prefer the B-side. Vocalist/songwriter Jeff Christie re-emerged with the band Christie, who had a U.K. number 1 hit with Yellow River (CBS 7" 1970). Some Britmovie members might remember this. Hope you like them. Until next week ...



                                Last edited by agutterfan; 10th March 2018, 10:41 AM.

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