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Black Friday

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  • Black Friday

    The day after Thanksgiving, in the U.S.A. Many individuals flock to the shopping malls and shops to start their Christmas shopping. Here in Canada, at least in Ontario, Black Friday tradition starting to take hold. Bargains and cheaper prices is what motivate many shoppers. In the United States, unfortunately problems exist. Gun shots fired, deaths. This year in Alabama, a teenager shot a 12 year old girl, her mother also. Police shot and killed the teenager. Many stores open early in the morning. Some around 5 a.m. so far, here in Canada, Canadians appear to be more civilized. No reporting of guns and people shooting at each other. A few years back, in a Walmart store, somewhere in America, hundreds were lined up, to get into the store. One woman fell, and was trampled to death from the crowds rushing into the store.

  • #2
    What Black Friday means to me :

    The Black Friday bushfires of 13 January 1939, in Victoria, Australia, were among the worst natural bushfires (wildfires) in the world.

    Almost 20,000 km² (4,942,000 acres, 2,000,000 ha) of land was burned, 71 people died, several towns were entirely obliterated.

    Over 1,300 homes and 69 sawmills were burned, and 3,700 buildings were destroyed. It was calculated that three-quarters of the State of Victoria was directly or indirectly affected by the disaster. It led to major changes in forest management.

    In the days preceding the fires, the state capital, Melbourne, experienced some of its hottest temperatures on record at the time: 43.8 °C (110.8 °F) on 8 January and 44.7 °C (112.5 °F) on 10 January. On 14 January, temperatures reached 45.6 °C (114.1 °F), which stood as the hottest day officially recorded in Melbourne for the next 70 years. ~Wikipedia

    I have no interest in a commercial Black Friday. Like Thanksgiving, it's an American tradition and has nothing to do with anywhere else, but of course, anything American catches on like wildfire (pardon the pun) in Australia. An Australian website even says, "Black Friday is easily the biggest sale event of the year." BS! Boxing Day has always been our biggest.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
      The day after Thanksgiving, in the U.S.A. Many individuals flock to the shopping malls and shops to start their Christmas shopping. Here in Canada, at least in Ontario, Black Friday tradition starting to take hold. Bargains and cheaper prices is what motivate many shoppers. In the United States, unfortunately problems exist. Gun shots fired, deaths. This year in Alabama, a teenager shot a 12 year old girl, her mother also. Police shot and killed the teenager. Many stores open early in the morning. Some around 5 a.m. so far, here in Canada, Canadians appear to key aspects of the human condition be more civilized. No reporting of guns and people shooting at each other. A few years back, in a Walmart store, somewhere in America, hundreds were lined up, to get into the store. One woman fell, and was trampled to death from the crowds rushing into the store.
      Sadly, greed and stupidity are two key aspects of the human condition

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      • #4
        Having worked yesterday selling Tv's, I can confirm that Black Friday is a bit crazy. Its actually expanded, to the point that I was getting pre Black Friday emails at least 2 weeks ago, which is nuts.

        I can understand the origins of black Friday in the States, and the fact that since Thanksgiving is one of the few bank holidays the US has, it's a long weekend. But even so, the hype is nuts.

        here in the UK, there are good deals to be had, but it puts retail logistics under huge strain, kills margin and essentially cannibalize the sales you would have made anyway. The fact that stores feel duty bound to take part is a bit like Jonestown, and even consumers may not get fantastic deals, although if you pick your moment, you could do well. £1499 for the Panasonic 802 oled is a pretty good deal, but I sold a lot more last week when it was at that price than this week. A lot of £329 LG tv's for second rooms were more the flavour yesterday.

        We should blame Amazon for a lot of this, although they are essentially knocking 40% off their echoes (my wife won't let me have one, even though I get discount on top of that), but the economics are a bit crazy overall.

        At least people feel less pressured to batter people at midnight in supermarkets for crappy tv sets any more, so there is that..

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        • #5
          Well yesterday was cyber monday.Today is probably Turkey Tuesday.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post
            I have no interest in a commercial Black Friday. Like Thanksgiving, it's an American tradition and has nothing to do with anywhere else, but of course, anything American catches on like wildfire (pardon the pun) in Australia. An Australian website even says, "Black Friday is easily the biggest sale event of the year." BS! Boxing Day has always been our biggest.
            Totally agree, Shirl. To me here in the UK it echoes our over zealous importing of "Trick or Treat" - completely meaningless this side of the pond until relatively recent years.

            Like you I regard Boxing Day as the biggie. Does Boxing Day even mean anything in the States? I always get the impression our American friends are bemused at the way we Brits have such an extended festive season and let it bubble on into the New Year.

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            • #7
              When I moved to Doncaster, I was surprised to find that the old tradition Mischief Night - on the night before Halloween - was still being observed by local youngsters. No begging for sweets - just petty acts of theft and vandalism.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tonch View Post

                Totally agree, Shirl. To me here in the UK it echoes our over zealous importing of "Trick or Treat" - completely meaningless this side of the pond until relatively recent years.

                Like you I regard Boxing Day as the biggie. Does Boxing Day even mean anything in the States? I always get the impression our American friends are bemused at the way we Brits have such an extended festive season and let it bubble on into the New Year.
                Americans dont have Boxing Day as a public holiday as such, although six states have it as a holiday, and schools are generally closed anyway. Its often a normal work day, or at least when the post Christmas Sales kick off. Americans actually have slightly fewer public holidays than many people on the Western World, with just nine Federal holidays a year, but there are also a fair number of state holidays. On the other hand, the UK as a whole effectively has eight, plus local ones, so its not as if we are over indulged either.

                Strangely, where I work is still closed Boxing Day, although the pressure will grow, as everyone else is. Boxing Day is a biggie for sales, but frankly, those deals that got kicked off in the mid season.Autumn slot and extended through to Black Friday/Cyber Monday sort of jog along at a low level until Boxing Day these days, with pre Boxing Day discounting (to drive sales if not margin) kicking in well before Christmas Day.

                Its all a bit desperate in many ways,but any store that doesnt do Christmas well is unlikely to last past April, so its the time thats crucial.

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                • #9
                  To be honest, I had to google "Cyber Monday", and I hadn't heard of "Black Friday" until very recently. I certainly don't recall any Black Fridays in past years. Maybe I've been under a rock.

                  I don't mind Halloween catching on in Australia, because the kids love it. They have a great time dressing up and it's an exciting time for them. In our area, there's always a parent accompanying them when they go door-knocking. Also, the "trick" part of it never applies. I forgot about it once or twice and didn't have any sweets to give them. I expected to find my pot-plants kicked over afterwards, or something else unpleasant, but nothing eventuated.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tonch View Post

                    Totally agree, Shirl. To me here in the UK it echoes our over zealous importing of "Trick or Treat" - completely meaningless this side of the pond until relatively recent years.

                    Like you I regard Boxing Day as the biggie. Does Boxing Day even mean anything in the States? I always get the impression our American friends are bemused at the way we Brits have such an extended festive season and let it bubble on into the New Year.
                    Xmas wasn't a public holiday in Scotland until the 1950's, Boxing Day was a just another day until the 1970's. I never liked the over-zealous importing of English holidays

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                    • #11
                      Years ago i was in LA on Halloween with the CTA.It was quite frightening.The LA cops were patrolling on their bikes up and down on Sunset Boulevard,and they were going to stop any trouble,and they meant business.We were staying in the Hollywood Roosevelt.Hotel,and it was pandemonium.Knocking on doors,running down corridors talking and laughing till about 3am.Never agin!So i resent it coming over here.We never open the front door to trick or treaters.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                        Years ago i was in LA on Halloween with the CTA.It was quite frightening.The LA cops were patrolling on their bikes up and down on Sunset Boulevard,and they were going to stop any trouble,and they meant business.We were staying in the Hollywood Roosevelt.Hotel,and it was pandemonium.Knocking on doors,running down corridors talking and laughing till about 3am.Never agin!So i resent it coming over here.We never open the front door to trick or treaters.
                        LA always gets a bit weird. I spent Halloween in Salem about 7 or 8 years ago and I had an absolute blast, I would love to go back and do it all again.

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                        • #13

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                            Xmas wasn't a public holiday in Scotland until the 1950's, Boxing Day was a just another day until the 1970's. I never liked the over-zealous importing of English holidays

                            Yes, I remember the shops being open as normal on Christmas day in the 50s. Kids got their presents, but it was regarded as being a 'papist' religious festival. Ne'erday (New Year's Day), on the other hand was taken very seriously. Absolutely everything was shut. No public transport, no pubs, nothing. I think people just stayed at home and nursed their Hogmanay hangovers.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by narabdela View Post


                              Yes, I remember the shops being open as normal on Christmas day in the 50s. Kids got their presents, but it was regarded as being a 'papist' religious festival. Ne'erday (New Year's Day), on the other hand was taken very seriously. Absolutely everything was shut. No public transport, no pubs, nothing. I think people just stayed at home and nursed their Hogmanay hangovers.
                              Indeed, a two day holiday was always given on 1st and 2nd of Jan. And an Old Firm fixture to add to the excitement. Roll on Scottish Independence, I say!

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