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How long will dvd’s Last ?

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  • How long will dvd’s Last ?

    As I recall, the first DVD players to arrive in the shops for sale was around 1998. Expensive machines, around 450 to 500 dollars. RCA was the manufacture of the machine. A couple of days ago, I found two dvd’s I had purchased then. I Put them into player and they played perfectly. Picture and sound quality was OK. But not up to today’s standards. So, if dvd’s Are kept in their cases, away from sunlight, heating and air conditioning units. Expect many years of use.
    Last edited by Derick Angerman; 20th May 2019, 06:26 PM. Reason: Spelling

  • #2
    According to The Guardian, over 50 years, if stored correctly

    Google is an amazing thing.

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    • #3
      Could be a case of expectation in comparing with what you've more recently become used to.

      I know I will often drag out an "old" DVD or digital file, and be disappointed with the quality, only to realise that more recent DVDs and/or digital files are of much better recorded quality given technology advancements. The old ones haven't changed, I'd just forgotten they just weren't ever as good the one I got only yesterday.
      Last edited by arthur linden-jones; 18th May 2019, 11:19 PM.

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      • #4
        I know I will often drag out an "old" DVD or digital file, and be disappointed with the quality, only to realise that more recent DVDs and/or digital files are of much better recorded quality given technology advancements. The old ones haven't changed, I'd just forgotten they just weren't ever as good the one I got only yesterday.
        I noticed that the fourth season of Buffy looked a lot better than the previous ones, as I was going through the box set. The blu ray player was the same, as was the TV. Its simply that was the point they started filming it in HD. The better the source, the better the reproduction, even if the actual screen resolution hasnt changed.

        Watching on VHS after DVD is a bit of a shock...

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        • #5
          Technology goes on. DVD and blue ray will eventually pass on. Even now, here in Canada and U.S.A., most DVD rental stores have closed down. Here in Toronto, downtown, Bay video is still around. All current and new films are on the telly for rental purposes. As Bonekicker said, watching a VHS picture was a shock. In 1976, the first video machines, beta hit the shops. Expensive machines, they were. Here in Canada, you were expected to pay around 1500.00 dollars for one. Today you pick up a DVD player for around 20 dollars.

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          • #6
            In any case, I digitise every one of my DVDs to .mkv or .mp4. Firstly as a "backup" (even if they don't deteriorate they can still be otherwise damaged), and it's much more convenient to carry around a collection of files rather than a heap of DVDs.

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            • agutterfan
              agutterfan commented
              Editing a comment
              But how do you break the copy protection?

            • arthur linden-jones
              Editing a comment
              I don't have any "high" end commercial releases that have complicated protection, so any that I do have copy protection, I can get around
              - DVD straight to .mkv file using MakeMKV (freeware)
              - convert DVD to .mp4 directly using Vidcoder (freeware) (mostly using built-in settings for (Super)/HQ576p
              - convert .mkv file to .mp4 using same above Vidcoder (mostly to reduce file size to > 4GB for FAT32 format tablets and smart phones)
              or
              - encode .mkv to .mp4 using AVIdemux (freeware) (learning manual settings took a bit of trial and error experience)

              Stubborn copy protection - coupla oldies but goodies, haven't been updated for yonks but still do the job. Either DVD Decrypter or DVD Shrink (both freeware) to make VIDEO_TS folder on the computer drive, then run that through one of the above options.

              (In the case of DVD > DVDShrink > AVIdemux conversions, I find it easier to set DVD Shrink to create one large .VOB file on the computer drive, rather than keep the multiple usual 1GB VOB files that makes up the DVD).

              There's an unresolved discussion/argument going around Australia that according to Australian copyright law (or the interpretation thereof), making "backup" copies of your own purchased DVD is not infringing copyright. Right or wrong - who knows?
              Last edited by arthur linden-jones; 21st May 2019, 10:38 AM.

          • #7
            I'd also recommend DVD Shrink, but I use Handbrake as the second stage to convert into MP4s. I'm not particularly techy, and both of these are user friendly (and free!).

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            • #8
              Originally posted by Big Figure View Post
              I use Handbrake as the second stage to convert into MP4s.
              Vidcoder uses Handbrake "engine" for conversions, just with a more user-friendly interface.

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              • #9
                I do believe that the quality of the actual dvd does have an impact.I have found recently that a DVD watched last December stopped 5 minutes before the end.

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                  I do believe that the quality of the actual dvd does have an impact.I have found recently that a DVD watched last December stopped 5 minutes before the end.
                  That sounds more like physical damage rather than age-deterioration.

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by arthur linden-jones View Post

                    Vidcoder uses Handbrake "engine" for conversions, just with a more user-friendly interface.
                    Oh okay - thanks.

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