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  • Colour systems

    I remember way back in the early 1950’s motion picture companies had names for their colour process. Warner Brothers used Warner colour, Paramount pictures used Vista vision high fidelity sound, 20th century fox used,
    colour by deluxe. Eastman colour was used by a British film company, I think it might have been, J .Arthur Rank films.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
    I remember way back in the early 1950’s motion picture companies had names for their colour process. Warner Brothers used Warner colour, Paramount pictures used Vista vision high fidelity sound, 20th century fox used,
    colour by deluxe. Eastman colour was used by a British film company, I think it might have been, J .Arthur Rank films.
    VistaVision was actually described as High Fidelity Motion Pictures (as opposed to sound), using 35mm film horizontally to utilise a much larger picture area. Hitchcock used the system on his 1950s films such as To Catch a Thief and North by Northwest, which is why they still look impressively sharp today. It was Paramount's answer to Fox's CinemaScope but didn't take off to the same extent. Rank were one of the few other studios to use the system.

    VistaVision fell out of use relatively quickly but the cameras were used by the special effects industry as the very sharp images could go through processes and still look good.

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    • Shirley Brahms
      Shirley Brahms commented
      Editing a comment
      Interesting info. Thank you.

  • #3
    I remember when CinemaScope came out, 20th century’ fox. Although the downtown cinemas In Boston adapted their screens for viewing, many of the smaller neighbourhood cinemas were slow in adapting. In those years, televisions, were being manufactured and ending up in homes. Names like GE, Strongberg Carlson, Motorola, zenith, were some oh the brands, American made. All have disappeared or ended up under foreign manufacturing. In the 1950’s, who ever heard of Sony?

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    • #4
      As Ian Fryer has pointed out, VistaVision was a high resolution filming process, not a colour process. VistaVision films used the Technicolor process.(there were also B/W films made in VistaVision).

      Eastmancolor was a Kodak product. Warnercolor, Metrocolor, and DeLuxe color were just Eastmancolor film rebranded to suit the studio using it.

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      • #5
        Thank you for this information. You can learn a lot from this website.

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        • #6
          I saw Carousel this afternoon. This was shot in Cinemas cope 55.A negative just over 55mm which has was reduced to 35mm for cinema showing.Only 3 films shot in the process.
          By the way anyone remember Moviegoround on radio with Peter Haigh,which was introduced by Carousel .

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          • #7
            Originally posted by orpheum View Post
            By the way anyone remember Moviegoround on radio with Peter Haigh,which was introduced by Carousel .
            Yes! That brings back memories.


            I saw Carousel this afternoon. This was shot in Cinemascope 55.A negative just over 55mm which was reduced to 35mm for cinema showing.Only 3 films shot in the process.
            As far as I'm aware only two films 'Carousel' and 'The King and I' were shot in Cinemascope 55. As well as being reduced for 35mm exhibition on first run, they were later printed up to 70mm and exhibited as being in 'Grandeur 70' (not to be confused with the early sound Grandeur 70 process.)

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            • #8
              Originally posted by narabdela View Post

              Yes! That brings back memories.




              As far as I'm aware only two films 'Carousel' and 'The King and I' were shot in Cinemascope 55. As well as being reduced for 35mm exhibition on first run, they were later printed up to 70mm and exhibited as being in 'Grandeur 70' (not to be confused with the early sound Grandeur 70 process.)
              Indeed only those two films in CinemaScope 55, but only The King and I was blown up to 70mm. The King and I was released on 35mm as a normal release just as the roadshow era was gaining pace. As the film was a big success, Fox obviously regretted missing out on a roadshow run and a few years later produced the 70mm blow up for roadshow presentation (including an intermission). Carousel was not a box office success and did not get the same treatment.
              In the UK The King and I opened at the Carlton Haymarket on September 11th 1956 and played for five weeks with four shows a day on a continuous performance, no booking basis. The 70mm version opened at the Metropole Victoria on August 13th 1961 and played for 13 weeks with one evening show a day, plus a matinee on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, separate performances and all seats bookable.
              Last edited by Odeonman; 11th July 2019, 11:11 AM.

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              • #9
                Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
                I remember way back in the early 1950’s motion picture companies had names for their colour process. Warner Brothers used Warner colour, Paramount pictures used Vista vision high fidelity sound, 20th century fox used,
                colour by deluxe. Eastman colour was used by a British film company, I think it might have been, J .Arthur Rank films.
                Eastman colour was used by Hammer.

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                • #10
                  Hammer. Did they not make a lot of the horror films with Peter Cushing?

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
                    Hammer. Did they not make a lot of the horror films with Peter Cushing?
                    Indeed they did. Along with Christopher Lee, Hammer made many horror films especially during the late 50's and throughout the 1960's. The Dracula and the Frankenstein films are arguably Hammer's most well known, but they both made films for Tigon and Amicus as well.

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                    • #12
                      One of my favourite, The house that dripped blood, Amicus was mentioned in the credits. I have this wonderful film on blue ray.

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                      • agutterfan
                        agutterfan commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Aaaaah, Ingrid Pitt (*sigh*). Yes, it's an Amicus Production.

                    • #13
                      I remember her who played the part of the witch. She was flying around in the film. As I recall, she passed away a few years ago.

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                      • #14
                        Does anyone remember 9.5mm film? I had a school pal who had a cine camera and projector in this format. The picture area was good, because the sprockets were in the centre of the film. Trouble was, as the film got worn it left an irritating line down the middle of the picture.

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                        • #15
                          Do many readers remembered 3-D films? I think, House of wax starring Vincent Price was the first one released, in around 1953. A few more films were released after that. One of the major complaints, the 3-d glasses you had to wear. Especially if you were already wearing glasses. Some 3-D glasses available were the clip on style.

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