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  • #16
    Originally posted by cassidy View Post

    Eastman colour was used by Hammer.
    It appears Eastmancolor was cheaper to use than Technicolor!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Derick Angerman View Post
      Do many readers remembered 3-D films?
      Yes, I do. They’ve tried it every few decades. It never works very well, does it?

      The best version of it I’ve ever seen was the British premiere of Scorsese’s “Hugo” which opens with snow swirling around a Paris railway station. We were sitting about half way back in the stalls and looking through our polarising glasses it looked as though the snow was falling onto the first few rows of seats.

      But sadly the 3D effects in the rest of the film weren’t anywhere near as impressive.

      Steve

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

        Yes, I do. They’ve tried it every few decades. It never works very well, does it?

        The best version of it I’ve ever seen was the British premiere of Scorsese’s “Hugo” which opens with snow swirling around a Paris railway station. We were sitting about half way back in the stalls and looking through our polarising glasses it looked as though the snow was falling onto the first few rows of seats.

        But sadly the 3D effects in the rest of the film weren’t anywhere near as impressive.

        Steve
        I went to see a 4D movie the other day. Now that is an innovation that really needs a top movie- to distract you from how much movie you wasted on that experience!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by cassidy View Post

          Eastman colour was used by Hammer.
          I believe Hammer achieved an especially rich colour palate by using Eastmancolor film stock but having it processed by Technicolor.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by cassidy View Post

            Eastman colour was used by Hammer.
            Anglo used the process for their horror movies, Horrors of the Black Museum, Peeping Tom, Circus of Horrors etc. it’s seems quite a common process amongst British filmmakers. Cheaper, I guess, than the alternatives.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

              I went to see a 4D movie the other day. Now that is an innovation that really needs a top movie- to distract you from how much movie you wasted on that experience!
              What's a 4D movie? What's the Fourth Dimension that they use? Time? Don't they all have that dimension in them?

              Steve

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              • #22
                The Eastmancolor Hammer gothic horrors which Jack Asher lit were particularly lush: apparently he was very fussy about the set-ups and filters. However, he was too slow for Hammer who stopped using his services by the mid sixties.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                  What's a 4D movie? What's the Fourth Dimension that they use? Time? Don't they all have that dimension in them?

                  Steve
                  4DX, to be more specific, vibrating seats, wind and moisture on the face, that sort of stuff. I was watching the new Men in Black movie, I can’t work out what I felt more aggrieved about, the movie or the experience

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                    4DX, to be more specific, vibrating seats, wind and moisture on the face, that sort of stuff. I was watching the new Men in Black movie, I can’t work out what I felt more aggrieved about, the movie or the experience
                    Oh, they’ve tried that before in the past as well.

                    Vibrating seats and even smell-o-vision.

                    It didn’t work back then either

                    Steve

                    Comment


                    • Odeonman
                      Odeonman commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Then there was Sensurround, which probably didn't do some poor old thirties cinemas any good, structurally speaking!

                  • #25
                    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                    Oh, they’ve tried that before in the past as well.

                    Vibrating seats and even smell-o-vision.

                    It didn’t work back then either

                    Steve
                    Yeah, they just charge a lot more for it now. Same theatre I was in also has a waiter service, Your seat comes with an iPad and you can order food and drink. None of compensates for a lousy film.

                    Comment


                    • #26
                      Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
                      The Eastmancolor Hammer gothic horrors which Jack Asher lit were particularly lush: apparently he was very fussy about the set-ups and filters. However, he was too slow for Hammer who stopped using his services by the mid sixties.
                      Exactly. Those early Hammer's were brilliant.

                      Comment


                      • #27
                        Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                        Oh, they’ve tried that before in the past as well.

                        Vibrating seats and even smell-o-vision.

                        It didn’t work back then either

                        Steve
                        William Castle was well known for gimmicks like that with his films as you probably know - 13 Ghosts, The Tingler, The House on Haunted Hill - all spring to mind.

                        I remember sometime in the 80's when they had some 3-D related programmes and a film was shown (don't recall which one it was), and they provided 3-D plastic 'glasses' with each copy of the TV Times. I have a feeling it may have been Channel 4, but I'll stand corrected if anyone else can remember.

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                        • #28
                          Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                          William Castle was well known for gimmicks like that with his films as you probably know - 13 Ghosts, The Tingler, The House on Haunted Hill - all spring to mind.

                          I remember sometime in the 80's when they had some 3-D related programmes and a film was shown (don't recall which one it was), and they provided 3-D plastic 'glasses' with each copy of the TV Times. I have a feeling it may have been Channel 4, but I'll stand corrected if anyone else can remember.
                          None of Castle gimmicks seemed to walk particularly well, I recall siting in a screening of The Tingler waiting for something to happen - on screen or off. It was a long wait.

                          Comment


                          • #29
                            Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                            Yeah, they just charge a lot more for it now. Same theatre I was in also has a waiter service, Your seat comes with an iPad and you can order food and drink. None of compensates for a lousy film.
                            It would be even worse with a good film. I'm in the cinema to watch a film, not smell people's grub or have bloody waiters getting in the way and distracting me. If people want to eat during a film they should stay at home.

                            Comment


                            • #30
                              Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post

                              None of Castle gimmicks seemed to walk particularly well, I recall siting in a screening of The Tingler waiting for something to happen - on screen or off. It was a long wait.
                              Yes, I can very well believe it. I vaguely recall another couple of his films - Macabre I think was the one where cinema audiences had to sign an insurance policy in case they "died of shock", and Homicidal featured a pause during the film where audiences could leave the cinema and get a refund if they couldn't handle it any more. Not quite sure how successful they would have been in all honesty.

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