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The making of Victim on BBC Radio 3

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  • The making of Victim on BBC Radio 3

    A new play, to be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Sunday 09/07/2017 at 21:00 BST, explores the background to the making of the Dirk Bogarde classic, Victim.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08xcqwp

    Nick

  • #2
    Why a play?

    Is there too little documentary evidence available from 1961 that Sarah Wooley has to fabricate artificial events and characters for dramatic purposes?

    Comment


    • #3
      This article from the current internet edition of 'History Today' magazine, reproduced to mark this year's exact half-centenary of the relevant Act of Parliament, describes the film's impression on the then British film industry.

      http://www.historytoday.com/andrew-r...-homosexuality

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rick C View Post
        This article from the current internet edition of 'History Today' magazine, reproduced to mark this year's exact half-centenary of the relevant Act of Parliament, describes the film's impression on the then British film industry.

        http://www.historytoday.com/andrew-r...-homosexuality
        Thanks, Rick, I hadn't seen the article.

        The play was reviewed on Saturday Review (Radio 4) yesterday evening.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes I heard the discussion. Saturday Review addict here. History Today can cost up to £3.99 per MONTH by way of PC access so its lucky the article from 2011 was still in its full version.
          Last edited by Rick C; 9th July 2017, 12:58 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I always listen to Saturday Review as well!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by zither View Post
              I always listen to Saturday Review as well!
              It has the tradition of discussion programmes that go as far back as " The Critics" which if I remember correctly featured film experts such as Dilys Powell, Philip French and Madeleine Harmsworth; very much in the style of "A Word in Edgeways" if you recall and the genteel but ascerbic TV programmes like "My Music" and Ludovic Kennedy in "Did You See". Its just one of the few remaining programmes nowadays that make the British Broadcasting Corporation really,well,British.

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              • #8
                ...British...
                Britain is becoming Less British every day!

                But, back to the topic, how was this fictionalised version of this film's making? Was it very dramatic? Was it sentimental? And slanderous?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rick C View Post

                  It has the tradition of discussion programmes that go as far back as " The Critics" which if I remember correctly featured film experts such as Dilys Powell, Philip French and Madeleine Harmsworth; very much in the style of "A Word in Edgeways" if you recall and the genteel but ascerbic TV programmes like "My Music" and Ludovic Kennedy in "Did You See". Its just one of the few remaining programmes nowadays that make the British Broadcasting Corporation really,well,British.
                  I remember "Critics' Forum" in the 1970s and '80s, and think I can remember "Did You See".

                  I'm going to listen to the play on iPlayer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It was quite heavy on exposition, which I suppose was inevitable. It opens with Dirk Bogarde disheartened about his career (having just made “The Singer Not The Song”), and ambitious to do some real acting in a good film. At the end of the play, in 1968, Bogarde and Forwood are moving house again – is this when they moved to France? Despite the fact that he has made this very influential film which has made a change in society, he asks Forwood not to be there when a journalist is about to arrive. Nothing has changed in his own private life, but his career has gone in a different direction, and he’s now a “real” actor.
                    The main part of the play is about the long and difficult journey of the film script to the screen, with all the doubts about the subject matter.
                    I think the play did give an idea of what England was like then, with the threats of blackmail and prison for gay men, not to mention negative attitudes held by many people.

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