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  • Star starring Julie Andrews

    As I recall, this film was released, I think around 1960’S . The reviews were not that good. As for her career, she was relatively unknown until Walt Disney brought her to America to star in Mary Poppins which enhanced her career. Her next big hit was The sound of Music. The reviews were quiet favourable. Films she starred in after that, were not all that successful. She also had a successful career as a singer. The Hitchcock thriller, Torn Curtain received mixed reviews.

  • #2
    She has a new book out next month about her career in Hollywood.The film was a financial disaster.After all who remembered Gertie lawrence in the sixties?It was probably made 10 years too late.Fox re edited it and sent it out as Those Were The Days,but it didnt help..

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    • #3
      The graphics on the poster art were fantastic - not that it brought people into the cinemas to actually see it. Click image for larger version

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      • #4
        Did Julie Andrews do a nude scene in one of her films? As I recall some of her fans found it disgusting. Let’s face it times have changed. No more Hays office around to monitor films. As I recall this was around the 1970’S after her film, Torn Curtain. As for the Hays office, they had a lot of saying and comments about films. The Hays office was founded by Will Hays a devout Presbyterian, eventually establishing a code of what was acceptable in films, quite a few producers had to makes cuts in their films to an acceptable rating.
        Last edited by Swenson; 23rd August 2019, 01:27 PM. Reason: Additional information

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        • #5
          She did a topless scene in S.O.B made in i think 1983

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Swenson View Post
            As I recall, this film was released, I think around 1960’S . The reviews were not that good. As for her career, she was relatively unknown until Walt Disney brought her to America to star in Mary Poppins which enhanced her career. Her next big hit was The sound of Music. The reviews were quiet favourable. Films she starred in after that, were not all that successful. She also had a successful career as a singer. The Hitchcock thriller, Torn Curtain received mixed reviews.
            Oh dear, where to begin? Walt Disney did not bring Julie Andrews to America, she was a massive Broadway star having created the role of Eliza Dolittle in the original Broadway production of My Fair Lady and went on to have more success in Camelot. She was rejected for the 1964 film version of My Fair Lady because Jack Warner wanted an established film star. Disney cast her as Mary Poppins the same year and she became an instant film star and went on to the massive success of The Sound of Music the following year. Star! was released in 1968 and although not much liked by the critics, did alright as a roadshow release at the box office, playing for 47 weeks at the Dominion, Tottenham Court Road.

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            • #7
              I do remember the book The Golden Turkey Awards covering Star!, and pointed out that it once again showed that most film titles that end with a exclamation mark tend to be stinkers, if only because if it was any good, you wouldnt need to put an exclamation mark at the end anyway. Boom! being another that conforms to the rule.

              I notice that Fox tried to recut it and then retitled it 'Those Were the Happy Days' (still a not very good title, but at least the exclamation mark had gone), but it didnt help. I didnt realise that Richard Zanuck ordered the recutting - the man had a reputation for taste, but I suppose the original was just shy of three hours long, so something had to give.

              And yes, Andrews was already a star on Broadway, having a standout role in The Boyfriend in 1954 (I always thought it was a 60's musical, so that surprised me). Her 'fans' do seem to have fairly fixed ideas on what they do or dont find acceptable depictions of her on screen. Once you have played Mary Poppins and a nun called Maria on screen, they kind of expect you to keep doing that. Since she had already starred in The Americanization of Emily, which came out only about 3 months after Mary Poppins, you have to wonder what they had been watching. SOB was directed by her husband, Blake Edwards, so she could push boundaries, and Victor/Victoria is actually a rather good and effective film. My kids know her as the Queen in The Princess Diaries ('Genovia, Genovia...').

              And as for Torn Curtain (1966), it was then apparently the second biggest hit Universal had had up to that time (The 1967 Thoroughly Modern Millie being the first, also starring Andrews), so what do the critics know?
              Last edited by Bonekicker; 23rd August 2019, 11:24 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Swenson View Post
                As for her career, she was relatively unknown until Walt Disney brought her to America to star in Mary Poppins which enhanced her career.
                Seriously? Where did you find this nugget of misinformation?

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                • #9
                  Perhaps "relatively unknown in America" would be nearer the mark.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                    She did a topless scene in S.O.B made in i think 1983
                    She was completely naked in Duet for One (1986) although she managed to cover most of her assets, except her bum.

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                    • #11
                      In the 1960’S Julie Andrews was not , what you would call a household name in America. The well known actors were Elizabeth Taylor, John Wayne, and others. Mary Poppins brought her name to the American public. The sound of music, enhanced her career with the American public. As I recall, Americans were subject to Elizabeth Taylor and escapades, she and Richard Burton.


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                      • Ian Fryer
                        Ian Fryer commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Depends on when in the 60's we're talking about. The Sound of Music was a hit of absolutely gigantic proportions at a point in time when traditional musicals had been losing their audience, and most certainly made her a household name from that point onwards

                      • Bonekicker
                        Bonekicker commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Its not until you look at the numbers that I realised just how massive The Sound of Music was - $286m take on a $8.6m budget, in part fuelled by people buying repeat tickets - my mum admitted to watching at least three times when it came out, and there must have been people who watched it a lot more than that - a bit like Titanic.

                        Andrews suddenly became not just a big star, but a sort of megastar.

                        Musicals did have some major hits pre 1965 - West Side Story, A Hard Days Night (a sort of musical), My Fair Lady (!), and Mary Poppins, but Sound of Music was a juggernaut. The soundtrack album alone sold more than 20m copies - its was in the top ten US Billboard chart from May 1965 through until July 1967, and it was in the top ten of the UK charts as late as 1969!

                    • #12
                      No denying The Sound of Music is a much-loved movie. Personally, it's top of my hate list.

                      Last edited by Shirley Brahms; 25th August 2019, 11:18 AM. Reason: clarification

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                      • #13
                        I could never understand why 20th Fox would even think of making a movie about Gertrude Lawrence taking into account 1. This was the late 1960's 2. The people going to the cinemas in the late 1960's had never heard of Gertrude Lawrence. Obviously, Fox were banking on Julie Andrews to draw the crowds but, the film was dead long before a single frame of its, expensive production, was even shot. Julie Andrew's following film after "Star" was "Darling Lill" and that was another turkey, as Paramount found to its cost. These two costly turkeys finished Julie Andrews meteoric career in movies.

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                        • #14
                          Originally posted by CliveT View Post
                          I could never understand why 20th Fox would even think of making a movie about Gertrude Lawrence taking into account 1. This was the late 1960's 2. The people going to the cinemas in the late 1960's had never heard of Gertrude Lawrence. Obviously, Fox were banking on Julie Andrews to draw the crowds but, the film was dead long before a single frame of its, expensive production, was even shot. Julie Andrew's following film after "Star" was "Darling Lill" and that was another turkey, as Paramount found to its cost. These two costly turkeys finished Julie Andrews meteoric career in movies.
                          Another turkey that thankfully avoided production (despite ten years of trying) was M-G-M's 'Say it with Music.'

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                          • #15
                            I could never understand why 20th Fox would even think of making a movie about Gertrude Lawrence taking into account 1. This was the late 1960's 2. The people going to the cinemas in the late 1960's had never heard of Gertrude Lawrence. Obviously, Fox were banking on Julie Andrews to draw the crowds but, the film was dead long before a single frame of its, expensive production, was even shot. Julie Andrew's following film after "Star" was "Darling Lill" and that was another turkey, as Paramount found to its cost. These two costly turkeys finished Julie Andrews meteoric career in movies.
                            Hollywood history is littered with 'why would anyone want to make a film about that?' productions.

                            This is the same studio that, knowing that it needed to make a quick buck to stay above water, decided to pay Liz Taylor a million to star in a film about Cleopatra (a subject that had already bombed in 1945), which meant that they had to accept her tax status and film where she wanted , pay her to film in a format that she owned, and put up with her frequent bouts of illness, spent years in production, and ended up almost bankrupted the company. Sound of Music really bailed them out.

                            I suspect people behind the film would afterwards probably say of Star!, 'it seemed like a good idea at the time'. And it possibly was an OK idea at the time, if it had been done relatively cheaply - it wasnt like the woman was interesting. But as a musical? OK, thats dicing with death.

                            I think musicals are a tough thing to do right on film anyway, but it must have got harder in the sixties. Musicals dont have to have the greatest or most realistic plots ever (yeah, so we are going to do a musical about cats....), and that can work on stage, because audiences can kind of deal with the artificiality . But when you have to open them out, it gets tougher, and some things just dont work (farce doesnt work well either). And if the script or songs are not all that great, then its a big snore. And the audience was more demanding - bigger sets, outside shooting, etc. Which means bigger budgets.

                            So Sound of Music works, as does Caberet, as does Grease. Funny Girl certainly works. Does Sweet Charity work? Box Office wasnt that hot at the time, although its actually a decent film. Audiences didnt like Godspell either. Nor did they like Dr Dolitttle.

                            And if you are writing a film from scratch as a musical or music heavy, you dont even have a track record. So Star! has a bigger problem, as does Lost Horizons, One From the Heart or New York New York, And there is At Long Last Love (total rubbish). On the other hand, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, Mary Poppins, Saturday Night Fever, Dirty Dancing and Footloose do work.

                            Darling Lilli is another favourite of those of us who love The Golden Turkey Awards, etc. Not an especially great film, but hit with having to film in relatively rainy Ireland (because thats where the planes were) and then Paris location filming was disrupted by the events of 1968, plus a botched release, and there you are.

                            I was surprised to find that Flight of the Phoenix wasnt a hit on initial release either, so sometimes its just the market.

                            'Say It With Music' - sounds closer to 'go bankrupt with music' - someone dodged a bullet. Irving Berlin? Seriously?

                            BTW - when was that announced? Tai Pan was meant to be made twice before it did (unprofitably, as it turned out), so was it in 1968 or the late seventies?

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