Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

Sighted: Ah There You Are!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I think by this point bowler hats were visual shorthand for city businessman. Anytime Monty Python showed a typical "city gent", they were wearing a bowler (and likely the Financial Times under one arm).

    One of the IMDb submitters in the past had Marianne and Ian on the brain, lots of spurious uncredited sightings in their listings.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
      Going upon a Secret Mission in 1942:

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Secret 1.png
Views:	1
Size:	414.8 KB
ID:	2783
      Stewart Granger looks on from his two small scenes in a kind of film he'd be starring in very few years later. Petty Officer Jack Sharp looks on with some dialogue to utter in a kind of film he'd stick at being a extra in for many years later

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Secret 2.png
Views:	1
Size:	466.0 KB
ID:	2784
      In occupied France, apparent quisling Percy Walsh heads for German H.Q. with it looks like Jack May sending him to Coventry centre stage at Denham

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Secret 3.png
Views:	1
Size:	462.5 KB
ID:	2785
      Hugh Williams sticks the equivalent of a "kick me" sign on the back of this German officer who appears to be Ian Selby, which is enough to make Ian tear his hair out.
      IMDb has Walter Gotell down for this one, but the gentleman shown as him on Aveleyman certainly isn't the Walter we know and love. Nor is it Ian Wilson.

      Comment


      • Top of the Form (1952) is a remake of 1939's Good Morning, Boys! with Ronald Shiner in Will Hays' role. Never on DVD or video, and apparently not broadcast on TV since 2001, so there are a lot of uncredited folks, both large and small:


        Shiner plays a fake professor with a scientific method for picking winning horses, which amuses heckler John Warren (and UM34 behind)


        John Lynn pokes his sizable nose into frame (he also appears in the nightclub during the last reel)


        The other bookies aren't pleased with Shiner and force him to pick the wrong horse, who promptly wins, much to the pleasure of Tony Castleton (and I think Jim Morris by the bus in the far background)


        but displeases the bookies, whose main enforcer is Danny Green. The main bookie with the binoculars looks familiar-Sidney Vivian?

        Comment



        • The bad guys chase Shiner into a local school luncheon, where the movie then follows the script of the original film scene for scene, with the school mistaking Shiner for a real teacher. Here a confused Danny Green is flanked by UM18 and Tony Mendleson.


          Shiner's "boys" (including such twenty-sometihngs as Harry Fowler, Roland Curram and Ronnie Corbett) compete with Howard Marion-Crawford's school; at the big exam, schoolmaster Richard Nellor manages to make an appearance.


          The second plot involves jewel thief Martin Benson, whose henchman are played by Ronan O'Casey and a stuttering Graham Stark (did Michael Palin see this before making A Fish Called Wanda)?


          The crooks' hideout is in a barbershop, staffed by Hal Osmond, with Jim Brady waiting for a trim.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Dave W View Post
            I think by this point bowler hats were visual shorthand for city businessman. Anytime Monty Python showed a typical "city gent", they were wearing a bowler (and likely the Financial Times under one arm).

            One of the IMDb submitters in the past had Marianne and Ian on the brain, lots of spurious uncredited sightings in their listings.
            When I worked in London, Dave (in the 1980s), there were still occasional bowlers to be seen, most memorably for me on a train, where bowler, black jacket, pin-striped trousers and furled whangee bamboo handled umbrella were on display, but unfortunately, the gentleman concerned was reading The Sun.

            Another favourite spurious sighting IMDb subject seems to have been Arthur Mullard, who more often than not does not show up in alleged "uncredited" appearances.

            Comment



            • Bob Raymond is unimpressed with the fake 'Marie Antoinette's necklace" benson has created for master jewel thief Alfie Bass to replace the original with.


              Like the original, the boys win a trip to compete in Paris, and their obnoxious antics make Ronald Shiner blow his top (I agree). George Holdcroft pokes in, wearing a hat that suggests his George Romanov alias, though I think it's just the French equivalent of a mortarboard.


              At La Cusiine la Diable, one of the waiters is of course Louis Matto.


              Shiner gets into it with the maitre d' AND the doorman, played by Louis Mansi and Richard Molinas, respectively.

              Comment


              • Taking orders for a Morning Departure in 1950:
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Morning 1.png
Views:	1
Size:	375.1 KB
ID:	2891
                Chief Yeoman Arthur Sandifer making sure Kenneth More has a full fried before he heads out for the rest of the day.

                Comment



                • Ronald is seduced by prominently billed Jacqueline Pierreux, who doesn't appear until the 59th minute of a 72 minute film, and has little to do. And inevitably, Emil Stemmler pops up as a waiter. Rex Garner also gets a brief closeup when he gets hit in the face by a cream pie (yes, it's that sort of film).


                  And when the boys are introduced to the French delegates, two of the dignitaries are Dan Darnelli and Norman Fisher.

                  Jack Mandeville can quickly be seen as a professor at the luncheon, Billy Wilmot and Hilda Green at the Devil's restaurant, and Jacques Cey as an unfortunate cafe patron who incurs the misguided wrath of an acrobat troupe, courtesy of Anthony Newley's spitball (Newley is particularly loathsome in this, and that's saying something). Not a good movie at all, but spotting all these folks made it somewhat palatable.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Gerald Lovell View Post

                    When I worked in London, Dave (in the 1980s), there were still occasional bowlers to be seen, most memorably for me on a train, where bowler, black jacket, pin-striped trousers and furled whangee bamboo handled umbrella were on display, but unfortunately, the gentleman concerned was reading The Sun.

                    Another favourite spurious sighting IMDb subject seems to have been Arthur Mullard, who more often than not does not show up in alleged "uncredited" appearances.
                    The Sun! harrumph...must have been from the colonies. . .

                    Yes, Arthur Mullard has a lot of spurious credits, too. Wonder if it was the same guy who hallucinated all these sightings?

                    Comment


                    • An Easter delight from 50 years ago:

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	vlcsnap-2017-04-13-21h42m08s666.png
Views:	1
Size:	337.5 KB
ID:	2957
                      Pat Gorman and Keith Ashley have a bank holiday knees-up with the Garnett family in "Till Closing Time Us Do Part" (tx: 27.03.1967)

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	vlcsnap-2017-04-13-21h31m08s909.png
Views:	1
Size:	437.1 KB
ID:	2958
                      The pianist for the songs from Jimmy Tarbuck and also Kenny Lynch is the series' music composer, Dennis Wilson.

                      I clearly remember this one from Alf's typically insensitive remarks about guest star Ray Barrett's facial acne scars.

                      Comment


                      • Budding background artists in Billy Budd (1962):

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 1.png
Views:	1
Size:	476.4 KB
ID:	2979
                        Bill Cummings takes the wheel as John Neville, Peter Ustinov and Paul Rogers cogitate

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 2.png
Views:	1
Size:	557.3 KB
ID:	2980
                        On board the Rights of Man, Del Watson congregates as he pitches up at the end of the film as a marine too

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 3.png
Views:	1
Size:	509.1 KB
ID:	2981
                        The jolly jack tars include Ernie Rice and Jack Sharp watching Terence Stamp who's jolly with all the jack tars

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 4.png
Views:	1
Size:	497.8 KB
ID:	2982
                        Good old John Meillon looks surprisingly jolly too as he's just had some exercise whipped up by Joe Powell

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 5.png
Views:	1
Size:	523.0 KB
ID:	2978
                        And whipping up the food is the ship's cook, who I think is Bob Head, with no extra leg.

                        Comment


                        • Also on board:

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 6.png
Views:	1
Size:	477.4 KB
ID:	2984
                          Chris Adcock tries to keep well out of the way of Captain Ustinov as he questions Master-at-Arms Robert Ryan


                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 7.png
Views:	1
Size:	440.7 KB
ID:	2985
                          And I'd want to keep out the way of this motley bit of the crew Mr. Ryan, Lee Montague, Peter Perkins and chum


                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 8.png
Views:	1
Size:	446.2 KB
ID:	2986
                          The Captain consults surgeon Julian Somers: "Have you ever seen one like that before?"


                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 9.png
Views:	1
Size:	570.4 KB
ID:	2987
                          Lee will soon want to flee when the flea-ridden lads get roused - Ray McAnally, John M, Thomas Heathcote and itchy Fred Woods, far right


                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Billy 10.png
Views:	1
Size:	619.8 KB
ID:	2988
                          As they line up for the bitter climax of the film, the scurvy knaves are joined by Mike Jarvis and Bill Baskiville as well as Robert Brown.

                          Comment


                          • Paul Massie has 1944 Orders to Kill in 1958, but first he needs to be trained up:

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	orders 2.png
Views:	1
Size:	528.4 KB
ID:	3004
                            Joining him in Nicholas Phipps' spy class are Barry Johns and George Holdcroft

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	orders 3.png
Views:	1
Size:	468.3 KB
ID:	3005
                            And when we move tighter in, we can see it's Vic Taylor joining in the sycophantic laughter. At times, Paul looks quite like Ed Bishop in this film

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	orders 4.png
Views:	1
Size:	512.1 KB
ID:	3006
                            Clearly, Paul has learned a lot during training as now he's in Paris, he has adopted an impenetrable disguise by wearing a beret. Charles Rayford is completely taken in

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	orders 5.png
Views:	1
Size:	429.2 KB
ID:	3007
                            When Major Eddie Albert goes on a hospital visit back in Blighty, and is crushed to find grapes are on the ration, it looks like Jack Carter is in the bed behind him, reading the script, which was based on a real wartime mission, it seems.

                            There must've been edits from that script though, as the screen credited Sam Kydd is nowhere to be seen and there's also no sign of the likes of Michael Kelly, Andreas Malandrinos and Launce Maraschal from the uncredited list.

                            Comment


                            • It's long before his official credits start:

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	chance 1.png
Views:	1
Size:	444.4 KB
ID:	3077
                              But could the worker second left amused by watching Hattie Jacques do a shimmy be Joe Melia having a Chance of a Lifetime in 1950?

                              Comment


                              • Joe Melia would have been only 14 or 15 when this film was made, so it's unlikely.
                                The face reminds me a little of Gerald Harper.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X