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Sighted: Ah There You Are!

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  • Maybe faulty memory in Black Memory (1947):


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ID:	4430 But, thumbs up, the first face we see might be George Spence, but I'm not entirely sure

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ID:	4431 Though it is Vi Kaley as a loud-mouthed neighbour, as usual, with worried Betty Miller on the doorstep

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ID:	4432 And Harry Terry as a bemused factory watchman who's just watched Michael Atkinson walk in, clock in and promptly walk right out again. Michael's seen the script.

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    • All a swirl in Whirlpool (1959):

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ID:	4458 The daggers Muriel Pavlow is glaring at Juliette Greco represent considerably more acting than the latter shows in the entire film. No wonder waiter Louis Matto is summoned to provide alcohol

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ID:	4459 Juliette, clearly auditioning to play Morticia in THE ADDAMS FAMILY, has a close encounter with O. W. Fischer whose dubbed voice by Tim Turner is incredibly but probably welcomingly distracting. Alf Mangan just gives them a resigned glance. I have mercifully cropped out O. W.'s also distracting rug

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ID:	4460 Jules and O. W. have a dance where the boring dialogue is momentarily broken by the pleasing sight of Charlie Price.



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      • But not an audition for a German version of ON THE BUSES:

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ID:	4462George Mikell is an unfortunate police officer, not a lecherous and over aged bus driver

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ID:	4463 On the docks of Hamburg, just east of Iver, Bucks., Ernst Walder, Ernie Rice and Jan Conrad gather for a conference

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ID:	4464 And on the Rhine, just above water level, Jack Sharp may soon find he and his captain are below that if their barge is barged.

        Much of the film was shot on location with locals doing the background artist jobs, but Arthur Howell does appear in a scene by the Rhine, although he is an uncredited police officer, not a credited Pilot as indicated by IMDb.

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        • Joining Sidney James in a 1947 film debut is John Le Mesurier in The Hangman Waits, playing the Picture Editor of the Daily Clarion, albeit uncredited. The credited cast have no role attributions, so apart from the three identified on IMDB: Click image for larger version  Name:	waits 5.png Views:	1 Size:	492.5 KB ID:	4500
          Ken(neth) Warrington on the left as reporter Williamson, who sticks his nose into police business Click image for larger version  Name:	waits 1.png Views:	1 Size:	504.0 KB ID:	4496
          Vi Kaley in her standard headgear and presumably Bessie Courtney who stick their respective noses into everybody's business and sell the murder exclusive to the press Click image for larger version  Name:	waits 2.png Views:	1 Size:	504.0 KB ID:	4497
          Edwin (Teddy) Ellis and Leonard Sharp as Joe, two Victoria Station left luggage attendants who find something grisly in their care being grilled by John Turnbull and uniformed colleagues Click image for larger version  Name:	waits 3.png Views:	1 Size:	467.3 KB ID:	4498
          James Lomas as News Editor Percy, who never lets a cigar out of his mouth
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          And Robert Wyndham as cinema manager Knight, whose cigarette he has just let out of his. I notice that like Donald Gray, Robert has an artificial left arm.
          Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 8th May 2017, 09:17 PM.

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          • Uncredited cast suffering from The Spaniard's Curse (1957):


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ID:	4522Harold Sanderson makes the first of three appearances as a passerby on this street

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ID:	4523 In court, Fred Stroud sits gloomily examining his spreadsheet of failed convictions

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ID:	4524 Barrister John Lynn more sensibly just checks the winners of the 3.30 at Newmarket. John re-appears in a café scene shortly after, but likely is playing the same character in civvies. Susan Beaumont just gets into frame

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ID:	4525 All in the frame as jurors are Evelyn Roberts (credited as "Capt. Judkin", but called colonel a few times), Muriel Greenslade (I hope) and A. N. Other on the back row and Billy John, the credited Constance Fraser and Wallace Bosco minus beret and pipe on the front row

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ID:	4526 In the court police office, P.C. is usually more worried about prisoners busting out than the sergeant's stomach.

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            • Don't get too upset:

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ID:	4528 Although it looks like John Tatum is in the dock - yes, I know his glum face might indicate that - he's just one of the coppers accompanying accused Basil Dignam. In fact, John even offers the condemned Basil a glass of water. The other copper might be Jack Silk, but we don't get a decent look at him. Prosecution counsel Ralph Truman is bustling into the well of the court and just visible in front of the jury box are reporters Hubert Hill and George Holdcroft. Norman Fisher looks far too cheerful on the defence benches in the foreground. I don't think that's Jack Heatherton in front of George

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ID:	4529 In the press room, Tony Wright is running for the phone, while Gerry Judge is already on one. Over to the right, it's the best sighting we get of Guy Standeven

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ID:	4530 Back on that street, Harold's back and in the very next shot he arrives again from frame right. Lee Patterson and Susan are already there. Unlike the rubberneckers, Pauline Chamberlain stands back from a closer look at a road accident

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ID:	4531 However, John Adams is not so fussy about sticking his considerable chin into it all: he's probably an off-duty policeman.

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              • cully
                cully commented
                Editing a comment
                First Pauline update at IMDB I've done for some time!

            • When the police decide to investigate the crime after the accused is defunct (!), they visit Henry Oscar's pawnshop. Although the location shots show the outside as "F. J. Newman", it's Frederick's once we get to Walton Studios:

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ID:	4533 Here John H. Watson uses his considerable ears to listen to nonsense from Henry. John Wilder does a beautiful silent look towards heaven as Henry continues to natter

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ID:	4534 Not silent for once is Graham Tonbridge who gets two words to say in his role as clerk to Ralph Truman

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ID:	4535 And in this shop, assistant Lucy Griffiths looks surprised as Johnny Wyne gets more to say than her. The scene seems to start abruptly and I think we're therefore deprived of seeing the previous customers, two little girls played by Linda Leo and Siobhan Taylor. Such is the curse of the Spaniard.

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              • The Diplomatic Corpse (1958) is one of those second features that in a couple years would be indistinguishable from an episode of The Saint or Danger Man. Still enjoyable, thanks to Montgomery Tully's direction, though Charles Farrell is a little loud. . .


                The title character is played in a photo (and briefly in long shot) by Martin Lyder, so I guess he can be said to have gotten star billing at least once!


                Philip Stewart puts in a brief appearance as Robin Bailey and Susan Shaw leave the pub.


                Arthur Dibbs manhandles a large package and prevents Susan Shaw from gettign a cab.


                And Louis Matto gets to investigate the case of why he's not playing a waiter as a sergeant in Inspector Liam Redmond's outer office.

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                • And finally P.C. Gerry Judge gets to haul off Bailey to the cell for egregious unctuousness.

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                  • Not quite sighted as the episode no longer exists, but among the uncredited cast at "The Funeral" in TILL DEATH US DO PART on 26th January 1968 is Gertrude Kaye. I bet she was wearing a hat.

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                    • We meet again in We'll Meet Again (1942):

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                      Jack Sharp far right as a stagehand who, like the theatre audience and cast, including Peter Gawthorne and Lesley Osmond, remain standing for "God Save the King"

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                      George Curtis, I think, centre pic as the sailor who's lost his girl in this port

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                      And leading Vera Lynn and Ronald Ward towards the port and other whistle ticklers is Club "Pack of Cards" headwaiter Louis Matto, somewhat trimmer, more hair but minus moustache.

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                      • Doing their best to stop Three Men in a Boat from sinking in 1956:

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ID:	4756 P.C. Vic Chapman is about to be up to his ankles . . . in dogs

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ID:	4757Aidan Harrington looks on as the sizeable bulk of Jimmy Edwards climbs in. Jimmy's in the centre; that's a horse's backside on the left

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ID:	4758 Outside Hampton Court, Graham Tonbridge is going to miss his bus. But somehow he gets transport to a dance near the end of the film as he appears there in loud blazer once more.

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                        • In the maze at Hampton Court:

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ID:	4760 David Tomlinson is put upon by distressed Esma Cannon with Roy Everson whizzing by, unwisely following Jimmy "to the way out". Roy's wages might've been way out on this film too as he can be seen several times, including doubling Laurence Harvey at one point and then as a shouting onlooker at a busy lock on the river

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ID:	4761 The tall gentleman on the right kindly shifts his position slightly so we can see it's John More. Surely he can see over the top of the hedges. But keeping his head down on the left is Jack Carter.

                          Someone has added in Kenneth Williams playing the Hampton Court Maze Attendant to the IMDb uncredited cast list. I could see no sign of him and the only attendant who does anything is the well-known and credited Harold Goodwin

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ID:	4762 At the lock, Robertson Hare takes forever to ready his camera as it looks like Jack Armstrong is not going to be snapped

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ID:	4763 Snapping at the three men are sundry outraged onlookers, including Arthur Dibbs, Fred Davis. Fred has done a clever trick as simultaneously he's up on the bridge with Robertson, albeit moustache-less

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ID:	4764 Looking on more calmly as David and Jill Ireland compare poles is, left, Ernie Rice in a dapper cream suit. The rest of the men follow Graham Tonbridge's lead and wear deckchair material blazers.

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                          • The next scene of havoc is staged at the Henley Regatta, where there are more outraged gents:

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ID:	4773 Almost filling the screen with outrage is Stuart Saunders just leaving enough room for Chris Adcock to squeeze in an appearance

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ID:	4774 Helping those sinking include Colin McKenzie, who also can be seen in the earlier lock sequence, maybe playing the same character

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ID:	4775 Campbell Cotts as Mr. Porterhouse is well able to fill the screen too. As he heads towards the camera, we can see his pianist far away from the camera is Johnny Wyne, who seems to have been a maestro of guitar and maracas as well as a tinkler of the ivories

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ID:	4776 Jimmy and Shirley Eaton waltz to Johnny's playing and Pat Halpin gets stuck in too

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ID:	4777 Laurence Harvey is unhappily introduced to a gathering of stern bankers, including J. Neil More, Norman Fisher as Mr. Fothergill, George Roderick as Sir Charles Hunter, who seems dressed more like the butler, and Philip Stewart. Norman turns up again in the cricket match scenes.

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                            • The cricket match is supposedly played @ Oxford, but it looks awfully like Littleton Park @ Shepperton to me:

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ID:	4783 And as Adrienne Corri and Martita Hunt head to the pavilion, it also looks awfully like to me that we've uncovered a 50s appearance from Lewis Alexander at last, sitting centre. Scott Palmer has been informed Lewis was in productions are early as the mid-40s, but I don't think he's been found yet. Ironically, I couldn't see Aileen Lewis in this one

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ID:	4784 Shirley and Jill get terribly worked up about a cricket match. Fred Stroud sneaks in on the left far more properly restrained

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ID:	4785 Finally, Larry has to face up to the stinging barbs of the formidable Martita. Richard Gregory leads his son away so he can't hear the language.

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