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Sighted: Ah There You Are!

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  • Getting into tune for Rhythm Serenade (1943):

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ID:	4907 Aubrey Mallalieu and Joan Kemp-Welch get a screen credit, but no role attributions, but here they are with Joss Ambler and playing a tetchy vicar and his dogsbody Miss Spragg respectively

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ID:	4908 This is a Vera Lynn flag-waver, but two of her charges are still down in the dumps: Jimmy Clitheroe as Joey and Maurice Rhodes as Len

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ID:	4909 Vera's got tea to pour for the troops and Peter Madden is the one on the left who prefers two lumps

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ID:	4910 She's still at it hours later, sugar or not, with Pat Hagan supervising on the right

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ID:	4911 From this sequence, somebody has added the name of Leslie Phillips in the role of "Soldier" and I assume it's this gent to whom they are referring , who may resemble him, but it's not 19 year old Leslie, so no "Oh, hellllo" here.

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    • Single-handedly doing up a country mansion to accommodate displaced children, Vera gets a delivery:

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ID:	4913 The delivery man on the right who gets to say a couple of lines in a very deep voice is certainly Jack Sharp, but could his companion be a younger-than-usual Arthur Dibbs? Jack turns up again later in the audience at the factory concert

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ID:	4914 Someone who never looked young in films was Ernie Rice, who looks a heck of a lot taller than usual here at that concert. Plus he's doing a "two places at the same time" trick

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ID:	4915 Everyone's got to do their job during the war and here it's Peter Murray-Hill doing the dots and dashes while his captain (Ian Fleming) tells him to abandon ship

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ID:	4916 But Vera's not abandoning her love of karaoke, much to the amusement of foreman Wallace Bosco. And she doesn't even sing "My Way".

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      • After the Ball (1957) boasts a large credited cast, but only one role attribution, although several have been put up on IMDb. Cyril Chamberlain and Eric (sic) Chitty I did not spot, but:
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        Steven Scott plays the cabby who takes Pat Kirkwood and Laurence Harvey home and gets an additional chorus of "After the Ball"

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ID:	4925 And Seymour Green is a stage manager who drools over Pat as, of course, does Larry.

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        • After the credited cast, there's a whole lot of their uncredited companions in After the Ball, mostly in the various theatre audiences to which director Compton Bennett frequently cuts for reaction shots. The story stretches over several decades, and the same folk turn up, un-aged and with moustaches added or removed, and that's just the ladies! And of course there's the magical seat position moves between shots. So trying not to duplicate too many sightings of our regulars:

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ID:	4957 In the Victorian era, Anthony Lang just about gets his face in shot as the film opens. Jerry Verno is doing the Leonard Sachs job, albeit with alcoholic perks. The chap in the wine-coloured jacket . . .

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ID:	4958 . . . is a cheerful George Oliver . . .

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ID:	4959 . . . and no doubt serving the cheer is waiter Jim Tyson

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ID:	4960 An appreciative and shocked audience which includes Jim Morris (a shot or two later and he's sitting somewhere else minus his upper lip foliage), Billy John, Jack Dearlove and "Gerald Lawson's dad". Jack, in the same costume, can be spotted in the audience "a few years later" too.

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          • It's Vesta Tilley's story, and heaving her baggage into her dressing room:

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ID:	4962 Is Lindsay Hooper

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ID:	4963 Obviously what's in that basket delights this audience, which includes Paul Phillips in the first of several appearances, Arthur Dibbs and Ernie Rice. Jim Morris returns. Ernie later appears as several stagehands throughout the years. "Peter Evans' brother" looking very like Peter Cushing and Laurence Harvey looking very much like himself are front row mashers

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ID:	4964 Another audience and this time we get Hyma Beckley, Paul Beradi and John Payne, all of whom crop up in other audience scenes. Oh, and Larry's back. Now, that bald-headed conductor in the pit . . .

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ID:	4965 . . . turns out to be Johnny Wyne (with lines!). Is there no end to that man's musical talents?

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ID:	4966 Pat Kirkwood as male impersonator Vesta thankfully doesn't fool Clive Morton, nor stagehand Jim Brady.

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            • Clive then heads off to a swanky part where numerous beaux await the arrival of Miss Tilley:

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ID:	4968 And Terry Sartain is one of them, sitting with his soon-to-be abandoned lady friend, right background

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ID:	4969 When Vesta swans in, although she already has a match with Larry, Tony Castleton, Martin Lyder and Guy Standeven are among those who are inflamed and wish to strike up a dance with her. Tony's the lucky one, but wonders who is going to lead

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ID:	4970 This audience is certainly enjoying themselves at a musical extravaganza, Jack May in the centre no exception. When Jack turns up again, it's during the First World War where his own musical extravagance runs to a street barrel organ. The mole-faced one is sitting in front of Jack and it looks like Lindsay Hooper again in the front row

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ID:	4971 These poor extras are waiting for director Bennett to get going. However, Otto Friese and Ernest Fennemore are doubtless relieved they don't show up again in the film.

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              • There's an American interlude when Vesta, with Larry in tow, crosses the pond to wow the crowds there:

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ID:	4973 First of all, there's U.S. Customs to encounter and U.S. customs to adopt and those heading for the green lane are Jack Armstrong and, I think, Alicia St. John

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ID:	4974 Customs man Roland Brand is about to find out what Vesta Tilley has to declare and I declare that's Bob E. Raymond under a big "F"

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ID:	4975 The crowds in America love Tilley, George Curtis among them. Paul Phillips and Hyma Beckley love her so much, they've obviously followed her from England

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ID:	4976 In the box, impresario George Margo has impressed his guests, including Tony Mendleson standing at the back and Pat Halpin

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ID:	4977 A closer shot shows us George's wonderfully-coloured temples a la Jack Armstrong, and it seems it's Fred Davis behind him.

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                • I wonder if Johnny Wyne was a professional musician in real life? he does seem to feature heavily in musical scenes..

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                  • Back on this side of the Atlantic and war has broken out. Tilley is enlisted to get more lads in the army:

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ID:	4980Ernest Blythe, George Holdcroft, Norman Fisher and Tony Spears are maybe to old to join up - Tony seems to having borrowed George Margo's hair dye. Bert Sims is certainly in the clear

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ID:	4981 But black-haired Robert Vossler is certainly keen, especially if he can get away from the hat that Lola Morice keeps putting in his face. But how did George Holdcroft suddenly get to sit next to him?

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ID:	4982 Yes, it's you, Joe Wadham, the next to take the king's shilling

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ID:	4983 And if Tilley does the singing, Sergeant Eddie Boyce does the recruiting

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ID:	4984Fred Stroud joins regular audience members Hyma Beckley (sitting on a cushion, I bet), John Payne and Norman Fisher. And it looks like Pearl Walters has joined in too.

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                    • On a rare night out, Tilley and husband tuck into some smoked salmon at Romano's:

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ID:	4986 Where Emil Stemmler tries to dazzle them with his usual extravagant display of wine-pouring

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ID:	4987 It's decided it should be Tilley's last concert and many of the old, but un-aged, faces pop up (Ernest Blythe and Norman Fisher among them) plus Wallace Bosco. What is Wally doing to make that lady next to him react like that? Anyway, downwind, Norman and his missus get a nice close-up a few seconds later

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ID:	4988 In the finale, Tilley gets her flowers as Cyril Kent, another of the stagehands down the decades who never ages, but sometimes has a moustache on, gets to beam and Roy Everson just manages to get into the last shot.

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                      • "Masters of Venus" (1962) is an eight part serial by the Childrens Film Foundation, I probably saw this in the late sixties during 'Saturday Matinee' at the Odeon cinema in Blackpool.
                        The film is a sci-fi fantasy, British rocket scientist Dr. Ballantyne (Norman Wooland) has been working on a manned flight to Venus, on the eve before the launch, two saboteurs attack the base, disable the guards with a sonic gun, they are ultimately foiled by Dr Ballantyne's two children Pat (Amanda Coxell) and Jim (Robin Stewart) but not before the launch sequence has begun. Pat and Jim are aboard along with two pilots Peter (Robin Hunter) and Mike (Patrick Kavanagh) who were left unconscious by the thugs who are later discovered to be six fingered Venutians.
                        The rocket lands on Venus and the now recovered pilots investigate a strange glowing crater, they are both stunned and fall in, Jim investigates and leaves Pat in the rocket, they are captured by Venutians and introduced to Votan the 'Master of Venus' (Ferdy Mayne) and his councillors with opposing views Imos (Arnold Diamond) withpeaceful intentions and Kallas (George Pastell) who wants to go to war with Earth. The Venutians were once a seperate six fingered, highly intelligent species on Earth in the lost continent of Atlantis, they were driven away to Venus by jealous five fingered humans. A robot is sent to secure the rocket as Kallas intends to send a deadly virus back to Earth to destroy all life, Pat short circuits the robot by firing a fire extinguisher at it. Peter, Mike and Jim are helped to escape by Imos's children Borlas (Jackie Martin) and Mara (Zienia Merton), they overhear the plot and after a few attempts they destroy the virus, Votan and Kallas are overthrown and Imos is proclaimed the new 'Master of Venus' , he says he will make peace with Earth. The rocket returns to Earth after a scare when the government wants to shoot down the rocket because of the virus, communications are restored and the crew are hailed as heroes.

                        Guards - Michael Collins, Lou Morgan, Bill Strange
                        Mr Hampton - a reporter - Jeremy Young
                        Venutian Saboteurs - Larry Taylor, Jack Taylor
                        TV Director - Del Watson
                        Tv Camera Operator - UM137
                        Doctor - Philip Latham
                        Ambulance Man - Hubert Hill
                        Control Room Technician - Colin Tapley
                        Venutians - Jeffrey Silk, Billy Dean, Norman Florence, Walter Randall, Bill Hibbert, Eden Fox, John Doye, Bill Sawyer, Harold Coyne
                        Newsvendor - Wallace Bosco
                        Passerby - Guy Standeven
                        Chauffeur - UM92


                        Already covered at the old site was There was a Crooked Man (1960), i originally viewed the russian dubbed version, i now have Network's new original version which i am very happy to finally see. I think may old post was 'lost in transition' so i will re-cap the uncrediteds i spotted first.

                        John Adams, Ted Bushell, Jimmy Charters, Dan Cressy, Arthur Dibbs, Vernon Duke, Joe Dunne, Ernest Fennemore, Norman Fisher, Edwin Fowles, Hilda Green, Victor Harrington, Walter Henry, Jack Hetherington, George Hilsdon, Philip Johns, Gerry Judge, Len Llewellyn, Dickey Luck, Fred Machon, Jack Sharp, Jack Silk, George Spence, Philip Stewart, Reg Thomason, Jim Tyson, James Ure, Robert Vossler, Bob Wright.
                        UM's 10, 17, 32, 36, 38, 39, 41, 88, 101, 103, 109, 125, 134,136.

                        New sightings

                        Civic Reception Crowd - Frederick Kelsey, UM20
                        Crooks Board Member - Joseph Tregonino
                        Hospital Door Porter - UM93
                        Hospital Passerby - Guy Standeven
                        Police Sergeant - UM147
                        Prisoner - UM37
                        Prison Warder - Del Watson
                        Factory Employee - David Storm, George Curtis, Robin Burns, UM138
                        Policeman - George Curtis (again)
                        Councillor - UF33
                        Town Hall Meeting Crowd - Austin Cooper, Manny Michael, Tony Sympson, Andy Alston, Arthur Sandifer, Aidan Harrington, UF31, UF32, UF36, UM14, UM19, UM29, UM52, UM82
                        Gang Member - Frank Maher, Bill Rooney
                        Policeman - John Tatum
                        Prison Van Warder - Colin McKenzie
                        Civic Dignitary - Gertrude Kaye, UF34
                        Washington Generals Meeting - Richard Nellor,, Graham Tonbridge, Max Latimer(stunts), N. Matthews, UM19
                        Last edited by philly; 15th May 2017, 09:10 PM.

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                        • Much obliged to philly for saving me having to watch another Norman Wisdom film!

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                          • Grabbing a couple from Smash and Grab (1937):

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ID:	5040Philip Ray as a railway station newsagent trying to appeal to Elsie Randolph

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ID:	5041Jack Melford as Russell, who probably doesn't appeal to Elsie either.

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                            • Some of those suffering from Dry Rot in 1956:

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ID:	5090 Joan Benham seems startled at the odds offered by Honest Alf, who, played by Ronald Shiner, is of course anything but. The already-sighted George Hilsdon does his stuff in the background as does Sidney James on the right. Jack May and Brian Rix just look characteristically dumb. The gent in the bowler . . .

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ID:	5091 . . . is in fact the perpetrator of the rot, John Chapman. Alf Mangan looks more suitably dressed in the stand

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ID:	5092 As John and Joan celebrate an apparent win, punters Joe Wadham and John Lynn size up the form. John has a nose for that sort of thing. Joe has a good time on this film as he also plays a jockey and another punter later on, as well as his usual role, as we shall see

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ID:	5093 Ron, Sid and Bri look quite pleased with themselves for some reason. And I think that's Bill Rayment himself just to picture left of Sid (who plays Flash Harry!).



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                              • At a later meet:

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ID:	5097 Lee Patterson and Heather Sears seem to have strolled in from another film. This time it's Fred Griffiths the bookie with George Spence as his assistant. The beaky-nosed punter in the centre . . .

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ID:	5098 . . . is Lindsay Hooper on a day at the races

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ID:	5099 Meantime, Messrs. Shiner and James have a day at the hotel bar, where Sid encounters his future Carry On nemesis Joan Sims as Beth the maid, m'dear. The previously-sighted Robert Gregory is also there getting tanked up and looking at the camera

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ID:	5100 No doubt wishing he was in a tank instead of having to climb over that horse's rear end is young Lord Rix with tall John More as the race official on the right, all as seen by the TV camera

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ID:	5101 Not seen at all are the stretcher bearers who leave this poor chap in a field. The NHS is getting worse. I think it's Vic Chapman as the chap.

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