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Kinematograph Weekly-1971-THE FINAL YEAR

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    • Two great posters from the February, 1961, ABC Film Review, which I have in my collection. THE SUNDOWNERS poster is on the inside front cover, with Robert Mitchum and Deborah Kerr in the film on the front cover and the BUTTERFIELD 8 poster on the back cover. The January, 1961, issue had an excellent colour poster for THE MIRACLE on the back cover.

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      • Butterfield 8 in "CinemaScope and Metrocolor". In fact that is only half right, in 1959 MGM had switched entirely to the new Panavision anamorphic lens for all of their "scope" productions. They continued to use the CinemaScope credit for another couple of years, presumably because they had paid Fox for a ten year licence in 1953 and thought it meant more to the public than Panavision. These "CinemaScope" films also carried a credit "photographic lenses by Panavision". At any rate, this is the only Elizabeth Taylor film with a CinemaScope credit as she refused to be photographed in the process due to the well known CinemaScope mumps, which fattened faces in close up. This explains why such big scale movies as Giant and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof were filmed flat. The Panavision lens didn't suffer from the mumps and Taylor had no problem with it.

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        • Quite right, Odeonman. Even MGM's JAILHOUSE ROCK in 1957 and GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON (1962) were filmed with Panavision anamorphic lenses, which were far superior to the old Bausch and Lomb anamorphic lenses, although they still carried the CinemaScope trade mark on the opening titles. I don't recall any past 1962, though, except those made by MGM in Italy, such as SEVEN SEAS TO CALAIS and SWORDSMAN OF SIENA and that Spanish made Western THE SAVAGE GUNS.

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          • Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
            Quite right, Odeonman. Even MGM's JAILHOUSE ROCK in 1957 and GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON (1962) were filmed with Panavision anamorphic lenses, which were far superior to the old Bausch and Lomb anamorphic lenses, although they still carried the CinemaScope trade mark on the opening titles. I don't recall any past 1962, though, except those made by MGM in Italy, such as SEVEN SEAS TO CALAIS and SWORDSMAN OF SIENA and that Spanish made Western THE SAVAGE GUNS.
            I heard that "JAILHOUSE ROCK" was actually filmed with spherical lenses and converted to anamorphic in the laboratory.

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            • Originally posted by Stephen Pickard View Post

              I heard that "JAILHOUSE ROCK" was actually filmed with spherical lenses and converted to anamorphic in the laboratory.
              I never heard about that before, Stephen. I don't think it's very likely, but you never know, sixty years in distance from the event. When I ran JAILHOUSE ROCK as a reissue in 1963, it looked like an ordinary CinemaScope film to me. But from memory, without getting out the DVD to check, on the opening titles, it stated: "In CinemaScope. Photographic lenses by Panavision".

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              • Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post

                I never heard about that before, Stephen. I don't think it's very likely, but you never know, sixty years in distance from the event. When I ran JAILHOUSE ROCK as a reissue in 1963, it looked like an ordinary CinemaScope film to me. But from memory, without getting out the DVD to check, on the opening titles, it stated: "In CinemaScope. Photographic lenses by Panavision".
                When did Panavision start marketing spherical lenses? Not in 1957? We do associate Panavision with anamorphic photography on 35mm.

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                • DBF, if you scroll down on this link it explains the photographic process on "JAILHOUSE ROCK'.

                  http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/wingcs8.htm

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                  • Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                    Quite right, Odeonman. Even MGM's JAILHOUSE ROCK in 1957 and GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON (1962) were filmed with Panavision anamorphic lenses, which were far superior to the old Bausch and Lomb anamorphic lenses, although they still carried the CinemaScope trade mark on the opening titles. I don't recall any past 1962, though, except those made by MGM in Italy, such as SEVEN SEAS TO CALAIS and SWORDSMAN OF SIENA and that Spanish made Western THE SAVAGE GUNS.
                    GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON. One of the great westerns. Turns up regularly on TV as RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY..

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                    • Originally posted by cassidy View Post

                      GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON. One of the great westerns. Turns up regularly on TV as RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY..
                      Yes, it hasn't been shown on television under its British title GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON for at least 35 years. Since then, they've always shown it under its American title RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY.

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                      • Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post

                        Yes, it hasn't been shown on television under its British title GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON for at least 35 years. Since then, they've always shown it under its American title RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY.
                        Thanks to home video, few British title changes have stood the test of time. You won't find many people these days referring to Love in Las Vegas rather than Viva Las Vegas, or Meet Whiplash Willie rather than The Fortune Cookie etc. etc. Although Ride the High Country has quite a high reputation these days, it was put out in Britain as the bottom half of a double bill with Village of Daughters and even then as a Rank "alternative release" (the dregs of the old National release), MGM's usual outlet, ABC, passed on it (it also went out on a double bill in the US).

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                        • Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

                          Thanks to home video, few British title changes have stood the test of time. You won't find many people these days referring to Love in Las Vegas rather than Viva Las Vegas, or Meet Whiplash Willie rather than The Fortune Cookie etc. etc. Although Ride the High Country has quite a high reputation these days, it was put out in Britain as the bottom half of a double bill with Village of Daughters and even then as a Rank "alternative release" (the dregs of the old National release), MGM's usual outlet, ABC, passed on it (it also went out on a double bill in the US).
                          I remember going to see VILLAGE OF DAUGHTERS and GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON at my local Essoldo in August, 1962. MGM handled GUNS IN THE AFTERNOON badly at the time, as they did with LUST FOR LIFE in 1957, which amazingly, they sent out as a support to THE SEVENTH SIN.

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                          • Originally posted by Odeonman View Post

                            Thanks to home video, few British title changes have stood the test of time. You won't find many people these days referring to Love in Las Vegas rather than Viva Las Vegas, or Meet Whiplash Willie rather than The Fortune Cookie etc. etc. Although Ride the High Country has quite a high reputation these days, it was put out in Britain as the bottom half of a double bill with Village of Daughters and even then as a Rank "alternative release" (the dregs of the old National release), MGM's usual outlet, ABC, passed on it (it also went out on a double bill in the US).
                            In fact I still have Guns In The Afternoon on video tape advert free from the BBC from all those years ago. It actually won a prize at The Venice Film Festival. Another that I have under its British title is Where The River Bends (Bend Of The River USA) . Two cracking westerns.

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                            • Yes, WHERE THE RIVER BENDS is another that hasn't been shown under that title on television here for decades. When they show it now, it's always under its American title BEND OF THE RIVER.

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                              • I recall several of the first 'X' films I ever saw had title changes. "CAGE OF DOOM" (US "TERROR FROM THE YEAR 5000"), "DEMONS OF THE SWAMP" (US "ATTACK OF THE GIANT LEECHES") and "THE FANTASTIC DISAPPEARING MAN" (US "RETURN OF DRACULA"). Another that I failed to gain entry into was "TERROR STRIKES!" (US "WAR OF THE COLOSSAL BEAST"), sequel to "THE AMAZING COLOSSAL MAN".

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