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Christopher Nolan ?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
    Losey was a cult director in the 60s and fell out of fashion in the 70s.
    Roeg was a cult director in the 70s and fell out of fashion in the 80s seeming to hold on to fame for a while via his wife.
    Greenaway was a cult director in the 70s and fell out of fashion in the 90s.
    The great Lean fell out of fashion making no films between 1971 and 1985
    The great Michael Powell fell out of fashion making smaller films with actors not of his choosing from 52 onwards. He became a cult director in the 80s.

    IMHO.
    I get what you are saying and I just about agree. Lean and Powell both fell out of favour, definately, and we can debate timeframe and reasons but in both cases, they enjoyed both critical and popular success for a period, and then they didn't. They were still great filmmakers but no longer that that level of wide spread support. In the cases of Losey, Roeg and Greenaway, I am not sure they ever enjoyed both critical and popular (i.e. boxoffice) success at the same time. They may have for insolated movies but not over a period of time. They were, I agree, cult favourites and probably still are.

    I don't think either Powell or Lean could be called cult directors.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
      The great Michael Powell fell out of fashion making smaller films with actors not of his choosing from 52 onwards. He became a cult director in the 80s.

      IMHO.
      52 onwards?
      What with Oh... Rosalinda!! (1955), The Battle of the River Plate (1956) [A Royal Comand Film], Ill Met by Moonlight (1957) and Peeping Tom (1960)?
      All starring actors of his own choosing

      Cult Director in the 80s?
      What proof do you have of such calumnies beyond your own opinion?

      Steve

      Comment


      • #33
        To be fair, you'd probably have described Peeping Tom as having a cult following in the 1980's. But Battle of the River Plate? No.

        I dont think I've every seen Lean described as cult - he was in many ways a very talented commercial director, but respected.

        As for Nolan, give it twenty years. Most decent directors with a body of work go through phases, but at least now its much easy to see their work. However, he seems to have a good track record, and Dunkirk does have excellent reviews. Reality is that your only as good as your next film!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
          To be fair, you'd probably have described Peeping Tom as having a cult following in the 1980's. But Battle of the River Plate? No.
          Who is that addressed to? Or which statement is it commenting on?

          I would describe Peeping Tom as very popular ever since it was first released in 1960 - despite, or maybe because of those scathing commercial reviews. But word of mouth often ignores commercial reviews

          Battle of the River Plate was a Royal Film Performance and was quite successful commercially for many years

          Steve

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          • #35
            Peter Greenaway's main/cult body of work was in the 80's starting with his first main/commercial feature The Draughtsman's Contract (1982). Prior to this he had only made experimental shorts.

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            • #36
              First of all, I never described Lean as a cult director.

              Secondly, I praise those who popularised Powell in the 1980s and paid for the restoration of his films.

              I haven't consulted the memoir in some years but I'm sure he mentions a mouth-watering international wish-list of a cast for Oh... Rosalinda!! but he wasn't able to secure the others apart from the wonderful Anton Walbrook. And I half-remember something similar for River Plate.

              And wasn't there some discussion that having the Peeping Tom hero being a psychopath AND a German was complicating the issue? And I can't believe Powell would have willingly cast the silky, effete Bogarde pretending to be a coarse gun-runner if he wasn't on a Rank contract. Curt Jürgens didn't appear.

              Originally posted by oddbodjunior View Post
              Peter Greenaway's main/cult body of work was in the 80's..
              Yes, you're right.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
                I haven't consulted the memoir in some years
                You should read it again

                but I'm sure he mentions a mouth-watering international wish-list of a cast for Oh... Rosalinda!! but he wasn't able to secure the others apart from the wonderful Anton Walbrook. And I half-remember something similar for River Plate.
                Powell wanted to get Audrey Hepburn for a version of Ondine so he got Mel Ferrer for Oh... Rosalinda!! as a step towards getting Audrey. Powell was quite happy with Ferrer
                There was no casting forced upon him or not of his choosing in Oh... Rosalinda!! or in The Battle of the River Plate. Although sometimes some of them might not have been his first choice but that's far from them being "actors not of his choosing"

                And wasn't there some discussion that having the Peeping Tom hero being a psychopath AND a German was complicating the issue? And I can't believe Powell would have willingly cast the silky, effete Bogarde pretending to be a coarse gun-runner if he wasn't on a Rank contract. Curt Jürgens didn't appear.
                There may well have been conversations about Mark Lewis being a psychopath AND a Germen but they didn't take place before filming (and who says he was a German?)
                And what's all this got to do with Curt Jürgens anyway?

                In the process of making a film, many actors may be suggested as "possibles" or even as briefly "attached" to the film. But it's only the ones who are in the film as it is created who really matter

                Steve

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
                  Curt Jürgens didn't appear.
                  Where? When?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                    Where? When?
                    Curt Jürgens didn't appear in Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post

                      Curt Jürgens didn't appear in Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)
                      Neither did Maria Callas
                      Why are you concerned about people who didn't appear in it?

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post

                        Curt Jürgens didn't appear in Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)
                        Have I missed something?

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post

                          Curt Jürgens didn't appear in Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)
                          I watched The Spy Who Loved Me a few months ago. Curt Jurgens did appear.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I thought Dunkirk was very effective. Not enjoyable but viscerally effective. No intellectual conceits (though I was confused by the chapter titles in the early sequences. And I was confused by the time span; day scenes then night then day.)

                            I liked how fragments of plot and characterisation were carefully released to help us understand the various stories and how the Hans Zimmer score dragged us through it in a wonderfully bombastic, sinister, almost continuous fugue.

                            I couldn't understand the various anachronisms. I was curious which scenes were shot in the US.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              About the original question - I'd hesitate to call Nolan the 'best' British director (or British/American) of our time, basically just because it depends what 'best' means. Personally I don't think he's come anywhere near the level of Memento in his more recent films. But then, perhaps I'm looking for something slightly different in a film than other people. Everyone has their own taste after all. I do feel that as Nolan has become more successful, his films have been made to be more widely accessible and enjoyable. Although I consider that to be a bit of a shame - e.g. I think he resorts to Hollywood cliches a little more often - nevertheless it's a difficult skill to make a film that resonates with such a gigantic audience. Plus, I do think his major blockbusters are better than many other comparably large productions.

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