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The Innocents:

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Stephen Pickard View Post
    One of the most chilling scenes for me is when the Kerr character plays hide and seek with the children. Desperate to find a hiding place she hides herself behind the large curtains. The camera is tight on her and all of a sudden Quint appears through the glass out of the night. Very effectively executed. Very difficult to create that chill in the audience. An effect without a drop of blood in sight. Not that blood is not effective, it can be when it is tastefully applied such as in some of the early Hammer Films.
    That chilling moment you speak of sets the scene for the entire film. Miss Giddens now knows Peter Quint does exist and is not just in her imagination. Same as when she hears Miss Jessel sobbing and later finds a tear on the book.
    Last edited by chillingfilmania; 18th August 2017, 12:26 AM.

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    • #17
      So who here wants a horror quiz?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by zither View Post
        ...Michael Redgrave makes the uncle/guardian a very dubious character.
        Yes, that character was very shady.

        The uncle's wish to be uninvolved was one of the contrivances which made the story a little bit non-credible. I read Henry James' opaque story and he was more in interested in literature than writing a scenario for a horror movie. It's a bit like that 1967 'horror movie' called 'Wait Until Dark' which was also full of plot contrivances; alone in a big city, anorexic, friendless and blind.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Stephen Pickard View Post
          One of the most chilling scenes for me is when the Kerr character plays hide and seek with the children. Desperate to find a hiding place she hides herself behind the large curtains. The camera is tight on her and all of a sudden Quint appears through the glass out of the night. Very effectively executed. .
          Great scene - the two that stuck in my mind from when I first saw it as a kid were:

          1) The shot across the Sea Of Azov where the ghost of the governess is staring through the reeds.

          2) The shot where the stink bug crawls out of the cherub's mouth.

          Interestingly, my favorite scene from the novella - the one on the staircase where she becomes aware of the ghost as her candle goes out - is not in the film:

          "I can say now neither what determined nor what guided me, but I went straight along the lobby, holding my candle high, till I came within sight of the tall window that presided over the great turn of the staircase. At this point I precipitately found myself aware of three things. They were practically simultaneous, yet they had flashes of succession. My candle, under a bold flourish, went out, and I perceived, by the uncovered window, that the yielding dusk of earliest morning rendered it unnecessary. Without it, the next instant, I saw that there was someone on the stair. I speak of sequences, but I required no lapse of seconds to stiffen myself for a third encounter with Quint. The apparition had reached the landing halfway up and was therefore on the spot nearest the window, where at sight of me, it stopped short and fixed me exactly as it had fixed me from the tower and from the garden. He knew me as well as I knew him; and so, in the cold, faint twilight, with a glimmer in the high glass and another on the polish of the oak stair below, we faced each other in our common intensity. He was absolutely, on this occasion, a living, detestable, dangerous presence. But that was not the wonder of wonders; I reserve this distinction for quite another circumstance: the circumstance that dread had unmistakably quitted me and that there was nothing in me there that didn't meet and measure him.

          I had plenty of anguish after that extraordinary moment, but I had, thank God, no terror. And he knew I had not--I found myself at the end of an instant magnificently aware of this. I felt, in a fierce rigor of confidence, that if I stood my ground a minute I should cease--for the time, at least-- to have him to reckon with; and during the minute, accordingly, the thing was as human and hideous as a real interview: hideous just because it WAS human, as human as to have met alone, in the small hours, in a sleeping house, some enemy, some adventurer, some criminal. It was the dead silence of our long gaze at such close quarters that gave the whole horror, huge as it was, its only note of the unnatural. If I had met a murderer in such a place and at such an hour, we still at least would have spoken. Something would have passed, in life, between us; if nothing had passed, one of us would have moved. The moment was so prolonged that it would have taken but little more to make me doubt if even I were in life. I can't express what followed it save by saying that the silence itself-- which was indeed in a manner an attestation of my strength-- became the element into which I saw the figure disappear; in which I definitely saw it turn as I might have seen the low wretch to which it had once belonged turn on receipt of an order, and pass, with my eyes on the villainous back that no hunch could have more disfigured, straight down the staircase and into the darkness in which the next bend was lost."


          "Common intensity" - I love that term from this beautiful excerpt.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Carl V View Post

            Can I ask anybody who has this film on the Blu-ray released by BFI, if you found the sound slightly out of sync? Not sure if all the discs are like that or just mine.

            Coincidentally - I was unaware of this thread - I watched my BFI Blu-ray version at the weekend and didn't notice any problem with sound synch.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tonch View Post
              Coincidentally - I was unaware of this thread - I watched my BFI Blu-ray version at the weekend and didn't notice any problem with sound synch.
              Thanks Tonch. It starts off OK - it only seemed to slip out of synch in the last half hour or so. Could be a dodgy disc I guess.....definitely nothing wrong with the player as I've never had any problems with other blu-rays or DVD's.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by chillingfilmania View Post
                My info is film was released in October of 1961.. I first saw The Innocents at boarding school. Got chilled to the bone and never forgot it. Every time I have seen it since it still has the power to give me shivers. That to me is the sure sign of the quality of a horror film. You can have your blood soaked gore fests.. give me a atmospheric, pysycological thriller like The Innocents every time.
                According to Film Review annual, it was released on December 10th, 1961, while Kine Weekly has its release date down as December 11th, 1961. However, it didn’t reach the Gaumont, Hanley until its six day run on Monday, February 12th, 1962.

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                • #23
                  I love the old black and white films, and this one was especially liked by its atmosphere, the story line is idle, but you literally sink and experience everything together with the actors. Deborah Kerr's game is amazing.
                  It's hard to find similar films, but I found "The hauting "on https://bestsimilar.com/movies/15844-the-innocents and also some on http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055018/?ref_=tt_urv

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