Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

It always rains on Sunday

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • It always rains on Sunday

    the best film ever.

  • #2
    Originally posted by googiefan View Post
    the best film ever.
    This is on my "to see" list.

    Comment


    • #3
      I always wanted to see the best film ever, but now I'm not so sure. For, if you watched the best film ever, all the other films would be lesser. Would you want to watch any more films at all, if you knew you'd already seen the best that there could ever be..?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
        I always wanted to see the best film ever, but now I'm not so sure. For, if you watched the best film ever, all the other films would be lesser. Would you want to watch any more films at all, if you knew you'd already seen the best that there could ever be..?
        For me, A Matter of Life and Death is the best film ever (everyone has a different opinion of the "best film ever"). But I still enjoy watching "lesser" films even if I know in advance that they aren't as good as AMOLAD

        Steve

        Comment


        • #5
          IAROS is certainly an enjoyable film with many of our favourite characters of the period and to me it portrays a kind of seediness that I imagine was not far from the truth in certain parts of 1940s London. It would be impossible thought to even say this was the best Ealing film because everyone has different criteria. A mass vote would probably go for Kind Hearts and Coronets but there would be several contenders. Choosing the best film ever would be as difficult (and thankless) as selecting the most exciting England soccer team in the last 20 years.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

            For me, A Matter of Life and Death is the best film ever (everyone has a different opinion of the "best film ever"). But I still enjoy watching "lesser" films even if I know in advance that they aren't as good as AMOLAD

            Steve
            Has anything come very close to being your best film ever though?

            Do you think that one day a film may surpass A Matter of Life and Death as your best film ever?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

              Has anything come very close to being your best film ever though?
              Oh, lots come in joint second place. Not only the others by Powell and Pressburger either

              Do you think that one day a film may surpass A Matter of Life and Death as your best film ever?
              I doubt it, but I'm open to offers

              If there are any other films that can move me to tears multiple times throughout it, when I've watched them hundreds of time, then I'll be glad to let them take first place

              Steve

              Comment


              • #8
                Stevo, you're an old softie!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post
                  Stevo, you're an old softie!
                  I know. I'm an embarrassment to watch AMOLAD with

                  Steve

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    With the "moved me to tears" criterion, I would have to give more marks to a film that gets me on the first pass, although a film that still does it on repeat is a pretty good marker. I like "Singin' in The Rain" as it makes me laugh even though I know it so well (and despite the extended Gene Kelly interlude that I get bored of).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't mean that AMOLAD makes me cry because it's sad. Far from it, it's joyous. Those emotions bubbling up inside me each time I watch it (and I've watched it a LOT) need some release - and they usually come out as tears. Tears of joy.

                      If I'm alone while I'm watching it then I might well call out.

                      It it just hits all of the right buttons for me. I love it

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In his book Zona about Tarkovsky's film Stalker (one of my all-time favourites) Geoff Dyer says "I suspect it is rare for anyone to see their - what they consider to be the - greatest film after the age of thirty. After forty it's extremely unlikely. After fifty, impossible." Well, I'm 58 so it looks like nothing will beat Walkabout...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm quite partial to the Wallace & Gromit movie A Matter of Loaf and Death

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Robin Davies View Post
                            In his book Zona about Tarkovsky's film Stalker (one of my all-time favourites) Geoff Dyer says "I suspect it is rare for anyone to see their - what they consider to be the - greatest film after the age of thirty. After forty it's extremely unlikely. After fifty, impossible." Well, I'm 58 so it looks like nothing will beat Walkabout...
                            That just shows what Geoff Dyer knows.

                            I first saw AMOLAD when I was about 10 and I still watch it regularly. I recently schlepped up to King's College in the Strand to take part in a symposium about the film - then they screened in, and yes, tears were shed

                            I'm 63 today

                            Steve

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                              That just shows what Geoff Dyer knows.

                              I first saw AMOLAD when I was about 10 and I still watch it regularly. I recently schlepped up to King's College in the Strand to take part in a symposium about the film - then they screened in, and yes, tears were shed

                              I'm 63 today

                              Steve
                              He means you don't choose your favourite film after you've reached fifty.
                              And I think in most cases he's right. The only one that's entered my personal top ten since the year 2000 is Mulholland Drive.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X