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Gone to Earth (1950)

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  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Sweeney Todd View Post
    Maybe the "disappointment" can come from the version you have seen ? the US version, cut, re-edited, is a pitiful travesty of the British original.
    Most notably when they cut the scene with Hazel (J. Jones) reading her mother's book of spells and going to the Stiperstones where she thinks she hears the "Fairy music" (really her father playing his harp) thus giving no reason for her going to meet Reddin apart from pur lust

    Steve

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  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
    My enjoyment of this film seeing Farrar in a good starring role was mixed with intrigue at how this peasant gypsy (or whatever) was able to run about the hillsides in such an extraordinary, highly-engineered corset and push-out brassiere.
    and run through woodland in bare feet with all those twigs & stones laying around

    Then there was the pleasure of the luscious photography (which reminded me of Narcissus, of course, but also Leon Shamroy's luscious Leave Her to Heaven when one scene was set in the golden glow of the setting sun, and then another one, and then another one, etc).
    Gone to Earth was filmed by Chris Challis, Black Narcissus by Jack Cardiff, Leave Her to Heaven was filmed by Leon Shamroy. Was it the film stock that you were admiring? They were all made in 3-strip Technicolor

    Steve

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  • jamal.nazreddin
    replied
    My enjoyment of this film seeing Farrar in a good starring role was mixed with intrigue at how this peasant gypsy (or whatever) was able to run about the hillsides in such an extraordinary, highly-engineered corset and push-out brassiere.

    Then there was the pleasure of the luscious photography (which reminded me of Narcissus, of course, but also Leon Shamroy's luscious Leave Her to Heaven when one scene was set in the golden glow of the setting sun, and then another one, and then another one, etc).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sweeney Todd
    replied
    Maybe the "disappointment" can come from the version you have seen ? the US version, cut, re-edited, is a pitiful travesty of the British original.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by TimR View Post
    I was finally able to see this Powell and Pressburger film., and I think it is definitely worth seeing.

    I had the impression it was considered a disappointment (I may be wrong) but I thought it is very interesting and beautifully filmed...
    A lesser film from P&P, it's from a book, rather than from an original script by Pressburger.
    But even a lesser film by P&P is usually quite a lot better than most films by anyone else

    Steve


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  • TimR
    started a topic Gone to Earth (1950)

    Gone to Earth (1950)

    I was finally able to see this Powell and Pressburger film., and I think it is definitely worth seeing.

    I had the impression it was considered a disappointment (I may be wrong) but I thought it is very interesting and beautifully filmed. Jennifer Jones is beautiful and I think very effective in the role although I don't know what a British viewer would think of her accent. The rest of the cast is impressive and unusual: David Farrar, Cyril Cusack, who I had not seen before and is good as the pastor, a hard part to play, Sybil Thorndike, High Griffith, George Cole and Esmond Knight.

    The story is a Victorian melodrama played straight, that is, without commentary or an attempt to update the moral lesson. I found that to be interesting.

    The cinematography by Christopher Challis is stunning - it is filmed in Shropshire, a part of England I have never seen, and the color is beautiful, as usual with the Powell and Pressburger films.

    I recommend it.



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