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London Belongs to Me (1948) Also known as Dulcimer street

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  • London Belongs to Me (1948) Also known as Dulcimer street

    A bit of a favourite of mine. A young Richard Attenborough and a touch of Alastair Sim thrown in for good measure.

    The Plot

    The film concerns the residents of a large terrace house in London between Christmas 1938 and September 1939. Among them are the landlady, Mrs Vizzard (played by Joyce Carey), who is a widow and a believer in spiritualism; Mrs Josser (Fay Compton), Mr Josser (Wylie Watson) and their teenage daughter (Susan Shaw); the eccentric spiritualist medium Mr Squales (Alastair Sim); the colourful Connie Coke (Ivy St. Helier); and the young motor mechanic Percy Boon ( Richard Attenborough) and his mother (Gladys Henson).

    Percy is in love with the Jossers' daughter and turns to crime to raise money to impress her with, but he bungles a car theft and finds himself accused of murder. Mr Josser digs into his retirement fund to hire the boy a lawyer. Mr Squales testifies against Percy, but in the process exposes to his fiancée Mrs Vizzard the fakeness of his claims to be able to contact the dead and to predict the future.

    Percy is found guilty, but his neighbours rally to his defence. With the assistance of Mr Josser's staunchly socialist Uncle Henry (Stephen Murray) they gather thousands of signatures on a petition to gain him a reprieve. At the end of the film Percy's supporters march through the rain to Parliament, only to discover just before their arrival that clemency has already been granted

  • #2
    Originally posted by Darran67 View Post
    A bit of a favourite of mine. A young Richard Attenborough and a touch of Alastair Sim thrown in for good measure.

    The Plot

    The film concerns the residents of a large terrace house in London between Christmas 1938 and September 1939. Among them are the landlady, Mrs Vizzard (played by Joyce Carey), who is a widow and a believer in spiritualism; Mrs Josser (Fay Compton), Mr Josser (Wylie Watson) and their teenage daughter (Susan Shaw); the eccentric spiritualist medium Mr Squales (Alastair Sim); the colourful Connie Coke (Ivy St. Helier); and the young motor mechanic Percy Boon ( Richard Attenborough) and his mother (Gladys Henson).

    Percy is in love with the Jossers' daughter and turns to crime to raise money to impress her with, but he bungles a car theft and finds himself accused of murder. Mr Josser digs into his retirement fund to hire the boy a lawyer. Mr Squales testifies against Percy, but in the process exposes to his fiancée Mrs Vizzard the fakeness of his claims to be able to contact the dead and to predict the future.

    Percy is found guilty, but his neighbours rally to his defence. With the assistance of Mr Josser's staunchly socialist Uncle Henry (Stephen Murray) they gather thousands of signatures on a petition to gain him a reprieve. At the end of the film Percy's supporters march through the rain to Parliament, only to discover just before their arrival that clemency has already been granted
    Compare the way that Mr Squales (Alastair Sim) goes up to the door with the way that Professor Marcus (Alec Guinness) goes up to the door in The Ladykillers.

    People often used to congratulate Alastair Sim for his work in The Ladykillers

    Alec Guinness has said that he based his characterisation as Professor Marcus on Alastair Sim.

    Steve


    Comment


    • Darran67
      Darran67 commented
      Editing a comment
      I also read that. Sim is a deliciously dark creature don't you think.

  • #3
    I particularly love the scene when Alastair Sim sits down with the landlady- you're not sure if he's going to make a pass or attack her.

    It's a great piece of acting. As you say, deliciously dark

    Steve

    Comment


    • #4
      I also think this is a great film. One of the best. I like Joyce Cary and Gladys Henson best.

      Comment


      • Darran67
        Darran67 commented
        Editing a comment
        Some great characters. And your quite right a great film.

    • #5
      There was a TV version of "London Belongs To Me" in 1977. It was in six hour-long episodes and featured Peter Jeffrey as Mr Squales. Or it might be 7 episodes - IMDb seems a bit confused, they have broadcast dates for 7 episodes but most of the entries for cast and crew talk about 6 episodes. Lots of other familiar faces in the cast, including my Dad, playing a judge. He was rather nervous about it at the time, as he wasn't sure if audiences would accept him in such a serious role as he was known for comedic roles. The judge has to respond to the "guilty" verdict by wearing the black cloth on his head to pronounce a capital punishment.

      Comment


      • Darran67
        Darran67 commented
        Editing a comment
        Never saw the 1977 version. how wonderful to look back and see your father in his acting roles.
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