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Those police documentaries.

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    I'm aware there was a large unemployment figure in 1930's, but at least communities helped one another

    I regard up until 1969 as 'the good old days', then Manson 'killed the 60's', and what with all the terrorism, massacres, and mayhem of the 70's onwards, it really did turn society on it's head.

    I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that. For one thing, juvenile deliquency was a problem long before they even coined a term for it in the 1950s.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Mark O View Post
      So if they're locked up for 11 hours (in a 24 hour day), then presumably for the other 13 hours they are not confined to their cells ?
      From the timings in the article it's clear that they're in cells for 14:05, working or on courses for 05:45. That leave 03:50 on the wing and 00:20 in the exercise yard - 04:10 in all, of which around 1:30 allocated for meals. Luxury!

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      • #33
        Having seen the cells, the journalist said he would hate to spend even 5 minutes in one - small and basic - bed, desk, chair, cupboard, toilet, sink. If I was faced with that at a holiday camp or hotel, I would demand a refund and leave!

        But it's not only the hours spent in the cell that matter, Mark. Your days are very regimented. Every day is a planned routine. Guards are in charge. A nightmare, especially if you hate authority and discipline.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post
          Having seen the cells, the journalist said he would hate to spend even 5 minutes in one - small and basic - bed, desk, chair, cupboard, toilet, sink. If I was faced with that at a holiday camp or hotel, I would demand a refund and leave!

          But it's not only the hours spent in the cell that matter, Mark. Your days are very regimented. Every day is a planned routine. Guards are in charge. A nightmare, especially if you hate authority and discipline.
          All the more reason to lead a law-abiding life, I would have thought, I really do have no truck with armed robbers, muggers, burglars, rapists, paedophiles, etc; they choose to do what they do of their own free will, therefore they become volunteers for the Prison system.

          The old saying "if you can't do the time, don't do the crime", comes to mind.

          I don't believe all that nonsense about 'deprived childhoods' are the root of becoming a miscreant, as a child I lived in a mouldy council flat for seven years, where one bedroom was so damp the drips used to fall of the ceiling every winter, and very little money for luxuries (though there always seemed to be enough for stinking cigarettes, both my parents smoked like chimneys), all that didn't make me go out vandalising and bashing people.


          P.S. The flats are still standing, all centrally heated and double-glazed now of course !

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          • #35
            All prisons are different. They are categorizes for the type of inmate and security differs with varying routines. All the staff and inmates have their own view and opinion, which of course are different. So I think you have to sift through what they all say to come up with a conclusion. Your conclusion will depend a lot on who you believe is telling the truth. They all have different agendas and axes to grind. So who do you believe?
            Trouble starts straight away for me as I don't believe a word ANY Crook says.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Toscana View Post
              Trouble starts straight away for me as I don't believe a word ANY Crook says.
              So you shouldn't. But I'm not ANY Crook, I'm Steve Crook

              Steve

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              • #37
                Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                A major problem would be having to share a cell with someone you just don't get on with.
                That would be awful. Someone I was acquainted with a few years ago was in prison and his cell-mate had the TV on constantly on a commercial channel. He nearly went bonkers. For me, that would be the worst punishment!
                It's bad enough at my local McDonalds, but at least I can leave.

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