Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Those police documentaries.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Shirley Brahms
    replied
    Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    A major problem would be having to share a cell with someone you just don't get on with.
    That would be awful. Someone I was acquainted with a few years ago was in prison and his cell-mate had the TV on constantly on a commercial channel. He nearly went bonkers. For me, that would be the worst punishment!
    It's bad enough at my local McDonalds, but at least I can leave.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Toscana View Post
    Trouble starts straight away for me as I don't believe a word ANY Crook says.
    So you shouldn't. But I'm not ANY Crook, I'm Steve Crook

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Toscana
    replied
    All prisons are different. They are categorizes for the type of inmate and security differs with varying routines. All the staff and inmates have their own view and opinion, which of course are different. So I think you have to sift through what they all say to come up with a conclusion. Your conclusion will depend a lot on who you believe is telling the truth. They all have different agendas and axes to grind. So who do you believe?
    Trouble starts straight away for me as I don't believe a word ANY Crook says.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post
    Having seen the cells, the journalist said he would hate to spend even 5 minutes in one - small and basic - bed, desk, chair, cupboard, toilet, sink. If I was faced with that at a holiday camp or hotel, I would demand a refund and leave!

    But it's not only the hours spent in the cell that matter, Mark. Your days are very regimented. Every day is a planned routine. Guards are in charge. A nightmare, especially if you hate authority and discipline.
    All the more reason to lead a law-abiding life, I would have thought, I really do have no truck with armed robbers, muggers, burglars, rapists, paedophiles, etc; they choose to do what they do of their own free will, therefore they become volunteers for the Prison system.

    The old saying "if you can't do the time, don't do the crime", comes to mind.

    I don't believe all that nonsense about 'deprived childhoods' are the root of becoming a miscreant, as a child I lived in a mouldy council flat for seven years, where one bedroom was so damp the drips used to fall of the ceiling every winter, and very little money for luxuries (though there always seemed to be enough for stinking cigarettes, both my parents smoked like chimneys), all that didn't make me go out vandalising and bashing people.


    P.S. The flats are still standing, all centrally heated and double-glazed now of course !

    Leave a comment:


  • Shirley Brahms
    replied
    Having seen the cells, the journalist said he would hate to spend even 5 minutes in one - small and basic - bed, desk, chair, cupboard, toilet, sink. If I was faced with that at a holiday camp or hotel, I would demand a refund and leave!

    But it's not only the hours spent in the cell that matter, Mark. Your days are very regimented. Every day is a planned routine. Guards are in charge. A nightmare, especially if you hate authority and discipline.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick Cooper
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    So if they're locked up for 11 hours (in a 24 hour day), then presumably for the other 13 hours they are not confined to their cells ?
    From the timings in the article it's clear that they're in cells for 14:05, working or on courses for 05:45. That leave 03:50 on the wing and 00:20 in the exercise yard - 04:10 in all, of which around 1:30 allocated for meals. Luxury!

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick Cooper
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    I'm aware there was a large unemployment figure in 1930's, but at least communities helped one another

    I regard up until 1969 as 'the good old days', then Manson 'killed the 60's', and what with all the terrorism, massacres, and mayhem of the 70's onwards, it really did turn society on it's head.

    I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that. For one thing, juvenile deliquency was a problem long before they even coined a term for it in the 1950s.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post


    Some quotes from the Northamptonshire Telegraph, "Life Behind Bars".
    WE'VE all seen the stories about life behind bars. "Prisons are more like holiday camps" – the inmates get to lie around all day watching TV, they have access to state-of-the-art gyms and they even get paid to play chess and learn to play the guitar. It's better than being on the outside and having to earn a living, right? I wanted to find out what life in jail was really like, so I spent the day at Wellingborough Prison. The jail is a category C prison, which is relatively low-level security, but it has a number of "lifers" and all inmates will spend at least 11 hours a day locked in their cells.

    A typical day in prison starts at 7.30am with a roll check, where the prison officers check everyone is where they are supposed to be. The inmates are kept in their cells for this and the officers radio in the verdict to a central control point. If the numbers are out anywhere in the prison the whole process has to be repeated until everyone is accounted for. Breakfast is at 8am on the wing and at 8.25am everyone gets 20 minutes in the exercise yard. There's also the chance to see the nurse or check in with the drug treatment team. At 8.55am the majority of inmates go off to their "job" or to the education centre.

    At 11.45am it's time for everyone to head back to their wing for lunch, where they're locked in their cells from 12.15pm until 1.30pm. After that, it's back to their job or the education centre. Only a few prisoners will remain on the wing, usually because they've just come to the prison and haven't been allocated a job or a course yet. The prison service sees this as a key part of their rehabilitation. At 4.25pm it's back to the wing again for lock-up. There's a roll check at 5pm and everyone is kept in their cell until dinner at 5.30pm. After that they're given a couple of hours to use the gym or attend an evening class at the prison's learning centre. In the evenings prisoners can also see specialists from Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous, or use the time to phone home. At 8.15pm it back to the wing again. There's another roll check and then you're left locked in your cell until morning.

    Inmates have their own TV and can stick posters on the walls and put up photos of their families. But the cells themselves are small and basic. There is a bed, a desk and chair, a cupboard and a toilet and sink. I couldn't bear five minutes inside one, let alone 11 hours. We left the prison through the same series of locked gates and doors as we came in. Cliched as it sounds, stepping outside reception the air did feel fresher.

    Read more at: http://www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/...-bars-1-754892


    I understand what you mean, Mark, but locked in your cell for at least 11 hours a day wouldn't be very nice. (In the first paragraph above... "The jail is a category C prison, which is relatively low-level security, but it has a number of "lifers" and all inmates will spend at least 11 hours a day locked in their cells.") I expect maximum security would be worse.

    Prisoner to journalist...... "Prison isn't like a holiday camp. The worst thing is being away from your family and friends. The deterrent isn't being in prison, it's being away from your family and that's the guilt factor too."

    Read more at: http://www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/...-bars-1-754892


    So if they're locked up for 11 hours (in a 24 hour day), then presumably for the other 13 hours they are not confined to their cells ?

    Leave a comment:


  • darrenburnfan
    replied
    Well, it probably wouldn't be too bad for a person like me who has no family or friends and therefore has no one to miss being with. In fact, I should think that boredom would be more of a problem than loneliness. A major problem would be having to share a cell with someone you just don't get on with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shirley Brahms
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    How do you know Prisoners are locked up in their cells for hours on end ?
    Some quotes from the Northamptonshire Telegraph, "Life Behind Bars".
    WE'VE all seen the stories about life behind bars. "Prisons are more like holiday camps" – the inmates get to lie around all day watching TV, they have access to state-of-the-art gyms and they even get paid to play chess and learn to play the guitar. It's better than being on the outside and having to earn a living, right? I wanted to find out what life in jail was really like, so I spent the day at Wellingborough Prison. The jail is a category C prison, which is relatively low-level security, but it has a number of "lifers" and all inmates will spend at least 11 hours a day locked in their cells.

    A typical day in prison starts at 7.30am with a roll check, where the prison officers check everyone is where they are supposed to be. The inmates are kept in their cells for this and the officers radio in the verdict to a central control point. If the numbers are out anywhere in the prison the whole process has to be repeated until everyone is accounted for. Breakfast is at 8am on the wing and at 8.25am everyone gets 20 minutes in the exercise yard. There's also the chance to see the nurse or check in with the drug treatment team. At 8.55am the majority of inmates go off to their "job" or to the education centre.

    At 11.45am it's time for everyone to head back to their wing for lunch, where they're locked in their cells from 12.15pm until 1.30pm. After that, it's back to their job or the education centre. Only a few prisoners will remain on the wing, usually because they've just come to the prison and haven't been allocated a job or a course yet. The prison service sees this as a key part of their rehabilitation. At 4.25pm it's back to the wing again for lock-up. There's a roll check at 5pm and everyone is kept in their cell until dinner at 5.30pm. After that they're given a couple of hours to use the gym or attend an evening class at the prison's learning centre. In the evenings prisoners can also see specialists from Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous, or use the time to phone home. At 8.15pm it back to the wing again. There's another roll check and then you're left locked in your cell until morning.

    Inmates have their own TV and can stick posters on the walls and put up photos of their families. But the cells themselves are small and basic. There is a bed, a desk and chair, a cupboard and a toilet and sink. I couldn't bear five minutes inside one, let alone 11 hours. We left the prison through the same series of locked gates and doors as we came in. Cliched as it sounds, stepping outside reception the air did feel fresher.

    Read more at: http://www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/...-bars-1-754892

    I wasn't advocating judicial execution, I was just inferring a more Spartan regime may be a deterrent.
    I understand what you mean, Mark, but locked in your cell for at least 11 hours a day wouldn't be very nice. (In the first paragraph above... "The jail is a category C prison, which is relatively low-level security, but it has a number of "lifers" and all inmates will spend at least 11 hours a day locked in their cells.") I expect maximum security would be worse.

    Prisoner to journalist...... "Prison isn't like a holiday camp. The worst thing is being away from your family and friends. The deterrent isn't being in prison, it's being away from your family and that's the guilt factor too."

    Read more at: http://www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/...-bars-1-754892



    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Nick Cooper View Post



    You should try looking through some 1930s newspapers sometime, if you will persist in this rose-tinted view of the past.
    I'm aware there was a large unemployment figure in 1930's, but at least communities helped one another

    I regard up until 1969 as 'the good old days', then Manson 'killed the 60's', and what with all the terrorism, massacres, and mayhem of the 70's onwards, it really did turn society on it's head.



    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    How do you know these things? How are you so sure of them? Because it's been reported like that in the scaremongering newspapers?


    Yes, let's go back to hanging people as well, like they did in the 1930s.
    Of course nobody was ever hung incorrectly Click image for larger version Name:	wallbash.gif Views:	1 Size:	2.3 KB ID:	1735

    There was still a lot of crime in the 1930s

    Steve
    How do you know Prisoners are locked up in their cells for hours on end ?

    I wasn't advocating judicial execution, I was just inferring a more Spartan regime may be a deterrent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick Cooper
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post

    You'd soon change your tune if you were the victim of crime.
    Since I already have been, I doubt it.

    Some years ago I had children's Christmas presents stolen from the back seat of my car (yes, I know I should have put them in the boot), the window was broken, I used to work with a woman who's elderly sister was attacked and robbed in her own home, is it any wonder I have no compassion for robbers and thieves, I'm entitled to my opinion, and I don't care for all this 'libertarianism' in today's society.
    I fully understand that some people lack empathy.

    In some places people have to wait weeks for a Doctor's appointment, a Prisoner is seen straight away.
    So what? Taking away on-site medical services in prisons would have absolutely zero effect on GP waiting times. You should be complainign about the causes of the latter, not making some spurious comparison with the former.

    Tending a vegetable patch isn't real work, it's provided food for the inmates, no one is forced to work in Prison.
    No, but if they don't work, they don't get paid.

    They don't have to stare at bare walls, they're all provided with TV in their cells, or read a book, sounds a pleasant, restful life to me.
    You're being deliberately obtuse. First you complain that they have recreational options, but when asked if you think they should have nothing, you reply that they don't have nothing, because they have those very same options.

    I'm not saying we should return to the days of the crank and treadwheel, but maybe a more 1930's style of regime, the good old days, when you could walk along the street without fear of being assaulted, and people in the neighbourhood looked out for one another.
    You should try looking through some 1930s newspapers sometime, if you will persist in this rose-tinted view of the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    In some places people have to wait weeks for a Doctor's appointment, a Prisoner is seen straight away.

    Tending a vegetable patch isn't real work, it's provided food for the inmates, no one is forced to work in Prison.

    They don't have to stare at bare walls, they're all provided with TV in their cells, or read a book, sounds a pleasant, restful life to me.
    How do you know these things? How are you so sure of them? Because it's been reported like that in the scaremongering newspapers?

    I'm not saying we should return to the days of the crank and treadwheel, but maybe a more 1930's style of regime, the good old days, when you could walk along the street without fear of being assaulted, and people in the neighbourhood looked out for one another.
    Yes, let's go back to hanging people as well, like they did in the 1930s.
    Of course nobody was ever hung incorrectly Click image for larger version  Name:	wallbash.gif Views:	1 Size:	2.3 KB ID:	1735

    There was still a lot of crime in the 1930s

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Nick Cooper View Post
    You think they should be under-nourished? Isn't that the sort of thing that Hitler and Stalin did?


    Not significantly different to the general population, then.


    The luxury!


    Wrong.


    Isn't that "work"?!


    We can probably lump these in with the "pool tables" et al. Are they supposed to sit staring at the bare walls in their free time?


    Wrong. They don't have to wear stripey pyjamas and a pillbox hat anymore, but for men there are still recognisable uniforms.


    A problem, but not universally true. That it's happening on the scale that it is is due to under-funding of both infrastructure and the workforce.


    Because you have no idea what you're talkign about. As usual.
    You'd soon change your tune if you were the victim of crime.

    Some years ago I had children's Christmas presents stolen from the back seat of my car (yes, I know I should have put them in the boot), the window was broken, I used to work with a woman who's elderly sister was attacked and robbed in her own home, is it any wonder I have no compassion for robbers and thieves, I'm entitled to my opinion, and I don't care for all this 'libertarianism' in today's society.

    In some places people have to wait weeks for a Doctor's appointment, a Prisoner is seen straight away.

    Tending a vegetable patch isn't real work, it's provided food for the inmates, no one is forced to work in Prison.

    They don't have to stare at bare walls, they're all provided with TV in their cells, or read a book, sounds a pleasant, restful life to me.

    I'm not saying we should return to the days of the crank and treadwheel, but maybe a more 1930's style of regime, the good old days, when you could walk along the street without fear of being assaulted, and people in the neighbourhood looked out for one another.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X