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Annoying adverts

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  • Annoying adverts

    Is anyone else annoyed by particular adverts?

    The ones that particularly get me are the ones for Currys (the electrical shop) where they have people claiming to be sales assistants who then talk about their latest “bargains” but most of them seem to include TVs. However they usually seem to pronounce HD as “haitch dee” - argh!!

    Who on earth taught them to pronounce “aitch” as “haitch”?
    Did someone think it sounded better? It doesn’t

    ​​​​​​ Steve

  • #2
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Is anyone else annoyed by particular adverts?

    The ones that particularly get me are the ones for Currys (the electrical shop) where they have people claiming to be sales assistants who then talk about their latest “bargains” but most of them seem to include TVs. However they usually seem to pronounce HD as “haitch dee” - argh!!

    Who on earth taught them to pronounce “aitch” as “haitch”?
    Did someone think it sounded better? It doesn’t

    ​​​​​​ Steve
    "Haitch" is used a lot here in Australia. Sounds awful to my English ears!

    Comment


    • Shirley Brahms
      Shirley Brahms commented
      Editing a comment
      Sounds awful to my Australian ears, too!

  • #3
    Originally posted by wadsy View Post

    "Haitch" is used a lot here in Australia. Sounds awful to my English ears!
    I suspect that some ignoramous somewhere might have thought that it sounded”posh” and was therefore somewhat “better”. In fact it’s just the opposite

    Steve

    Comment


    • #4
      Many people will argue that it's correct.
      I suppose there's no telling how it began, but it goes back decades. I always associate it with Catholics, because all through my childhood (in Sydney), the only people I knew who said "haitch" were Catholics. My next door neighbour friend always said it and when I told her it was wrong, she said the nuns taught it! I remember that distinctly.

      What really cheeses me off is when mispronunciations become so commonplace that they become accepted as correct. Not only mispronunciations, but basic grammar as well.

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post
        Many people will argue that it's correct.
        I suppose there's no telling how it began, but it goes back decades. I always associate it with Catholics, because all through my childhood (in Sydney), the only people I knew who said "haitch" were Catholics. My next door neighbour friend always said it and when I told her it was wrong, she said the nuns taught it! I remember that distinctly.

        What really cheeses me off is when mispronunciations become so commonplace that they become accepted as correct. Not only mispronunciations, but basic grammar as well.
        Hi Shirl. There was a show on channel 2 with Peter Rowsthorn a few years ago where a female English language professor said both "Haitch" & "Aitch" were considered acceptable. I forget the name of the programme!
        Last edited by wadsy; 29th October 2017, 07:18 AM.

        Comment


        • #6
          Z pronounced 'zee' also gets on my teeth (along with haitch)

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by Mark O View Post
            Z pronounced 'zee' also gets on my teeth (along with haitch)
            Hi Mark! I think "zee" might be American English.....?

            Originally posted by wadsy View Post

            Hi Shirl. There was a show on channel 2 with Peter Rowsthorn a few years ago where a female English language professor said both "Haitch" & "Aitch" were considered acceptable. I forget the name of the programme!
            Unbelievable! You'd expect an English language professor to know better, but this is what happens.

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
              Is anyone else annoyed by particular adverts?
              Most annoying adverts? Crikey, where do I begin. Well, for me the two most annoying are without doubt the meerkat adverts closely followed by those '118 118' adverts with those two guys clowning around.
              I don't know if anyone else thinks the same, but as a kid I recall some very funny adverts back then even though I'm sure there must have been some terrible ones too. But nowadays, most are either forgettable or just irritating.

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by wadsy View Post

                Hi Shirl. There was a show on channel 2 with Peter Rowsthorn a few years ago where a female English language professor said both "Haitch" & "Aitch" were considered acceptable. I forget the name of the programme!
                Maybe they are both considered acceptable - but only 'aitch' is correct

                Steve

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                  Maybe they are both considered acceptable - but only 'aitch' is correct

                  Steve
                  Being OK with something that's incorrect reflects sloppy standards.
                  IMO.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                    Maybe they are both considered acceptable - but only 'aitch' is correct

                    Steve
                    There was at one time a TV series called Mr.Aitch, Steve. Just us of a certain hage will remember..

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

                      Hi Mark! I think "zee" might be American English.....?




                      Hi Shirley, I think it probably is, having watched endless American output since the sixties, like I love Lucy and the Beverly Hillbillies onwards.

                      Americans don't seem to be able to pronounce their t's, butter is spoken as 'budder', also I was in a burger joint in Frisco when the girl behind the counter couldn't understand me when I said a number eight please, said properly with a t, eventually I pointed up to the board, and she said 'eigh' without a t, I said we say it with a t, honestly !

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I always thought that 'Haitch' was a Cockney affectation related to the of dropping the letter 'h' where it belongs as in 'orse' for horse and 'ouse' for house and then over compensating in other areas and coming up with 'hofficer' for officer and 'haitch' for aitch. But getting back to adverts - aren't' they all annoying?

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by Christopher Matheson View Post
                          I always thought that 'Haitch' was a Cockney affectation related to the of dropping the letter 'h' where it belongs as in 'orse' for horse and 'ouse' for house and then over compensating in other areas and coming up with 'hofficer' for officer and 'haitch' for aitch. But getting back to adverts - aren't' they all annoying?
                          Parker in Thunderbirds put an h in front of his words, as in 'happy hanniversary', as did Mrs Bridges in Upstairs Downstairs (when instructing a new kitchen maid in the art of peeling potatoes) 'see that, it's a heye'.......lol.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by Mark O View Post


                            Americans don't seem to be able to pronounce their t's, butter is spoken as 'budder', also I was in a burger joint in Frisco when the girl behind the counter couldn't understand me when I said a number eight please, said properly with a t, eventually I pointed up to the board, and she said 'eigh' without a t, I said we say it with a t, honestly !
                            Watching “The Big Bang Theory” they also seem to have great difficulty in prouncing the ‘L’ in “solder”. They repeatedly said “soder”

                            Does anyone else know of any examples of a silent L?

                            Either in American or in proper English

                            Steve

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