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Whatever happened to the “nology”?

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  • Whatever happened to the “nology”?

    I see (and hear) many people using just “Tech” for “Technology”

    That might be thought to mean Technival, Technocrat or many other words beginning “Tech”

    It’s a bad abbreviation IMHO

    Steve

  • #2
    Also when did people start using "kit" instead of "equipment"?

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    • #3
      Also when did people start using "kit" instead of "equipment"?
      The 'kitbag' was current around from around 1895-1900, so 'kit' as a description must have predated it. As for 'tech', thats probably older than we think. Certainly 'high-tech' was coined as for back as 1968. So its not unnatural for 'high tech equipment' to end up as 'tech'. Thats the beauty of the English language, its amazingly adaptable and goes with what works, rather than what a committee thinks it should be. Its almost Darwinian.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post

        The 'kitbag' was current around from around 1895-1900, so 'kit' as a description must have predated it. As for 'tech', thats probably older than we think. Certainly 'high-tech' was coined as for back as 1968. So its not unnatural for 'high tech equipment' to end up as 'tech'. Thats the beauty of the English language, its amazingly adaptable and goes with what works, rather than what a committee thinks it should be. Its almost Darwinian.
        True, the English language is ever-evolving but not always for the better. My top aversion is the use of nouns as verbs, such as "medalled" for won a medal, "charted" mostly in the pop industry, for something that got into the "charts" and "trained" and "de-trained" for travelling by train.
        It's also true that the use of "tech" has been around for a long time. In the murky days of my youth, there were grammar schools, secondary schools and technical colleges, which were universally called "techs". If you got a place in the "Tech" you were one step above even the grammar-school kids and had a better chance of getting "an ology".
        Similarly, "hi-fi" has always been with us it seems and I doubt if many people ever knew what "fidelity" meant in that case, high or low.
        Incidentally there's an American actor called Topher Grace, who explains that his first name is Christopher, but everyone abbreviates that to "Chris", so he thought he'd use the other half of Chris - topher just to be different.

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        • #5
          I always thought it meant Technicolor...
          Last edited by Wearysloth; 12th November 2017, 07:10 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
            As for 'tech', thats probably older than we think. Certainly 'high-tech' was coined as for back as 1968. So its not unnatural for 'high tech equipment' to end up as 'tech'. Thats the beauty of the English language, its amazingly adaptable and goes with what works, rather than what a committee thinks it should be. Its almost Darwinian.
            I don’t deny the Darwinian nature of the English language. But as you and others say, there are loads of meanings for “Tech” I just wish that people wouldn’t use an ambiguous abbreviation, especially when the word technology is just as easy to use

            Steve

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            • #7
              The now long gone Broadway cinema in Stoke on Trent often used the abbreviation ‘Tech’ for Technicolor on their monthly programme cards. Or at least the printers they used did to save on space. This example, showing ‘BAMBI’ as being in (Tech), is from March, 1958.

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              • #8
                ..and it's a 'torch' not a 'flashlight' ..you don't crawl around the stair cupboard flashing a light when your looking for something.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                  The now long gone Broadway cinema in Stoke on Trent often used the abbreviation ‘Tech’ for Technicolor on their monthly programme cards. Or at least the printers they used did to save on space. This example, showing ‘BAMBI’ as being in (Tech), is from March, 1958.
                  Thanks, another example of why using "tech" for technology is lazy and inappropriate

                  Steve

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                  • #10

                    Originally posted by Judge Foozle View Post

                    True, the English language is ever-evolving but not always for the better. My top aversion is the use of nouns as verbs, such as "medalled" for won a medal, "charted" mostly in the pop industry, for something that got into the "charts" and "trained" and "de-trained" for travelling by train.
                    It's also true that the use of "tech" has been around for a long time. In the murky days of my youth, there were grammar schools, secondary schools and technical colleges, which were universally called "techs". If you got a place in the "Tech" you were one step above even the grammar-school kids and had a better chance of getting "an ology".
                    Similarly, "hi-fi" has always been with us it seems and I doubt if many people ever knew what "fidelity" meant in that case, high or low.
                    Incidentally there's an American actor called Topher Grace, who explains that his first name is Christopher, but everyone abbreviates that to "Chris", so he thought he'd use the other half of Chris - topher just to be different.
                    I, too, have an aversion to the use of nouns as verbs. "Trending" and "guesting" make me cringe - I think it''s awful, and my new discovery - "modding". Also "impacting" rather than ''affecting'', which is almost obsolete now. I suppose it's convenient for those who don't know the difference between "affect" and "effect".
                    I went to Tech when I left high school, to learn shorthand and typing. "High technology" became "hi-tech" (as Bonekicker has mentioned) and "technician" has become "tech", too.


                    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                    I don’t deny the Darwinian nature of the English language. But as you and others say, there are loads of meanings for “Tech” I just wish that people wouldn’t use an ambiguous abbreviation, especially when the word technology is just as easy to use.
                    Steve
                    "App" is another ambiguous abbreviation. I've never seen or heard "download the application", but I presume that's what it means, due to the context. Otherwise, an "app" could just as easily be an application form, an appliance, an apprentice or apprenticeship - many other things - appearance, appraisal, appendix, appetite, appendage, appeal, approval....... I'll stop there!
                    Last edited by Shirley Brahms; 12th November 2017, 12:02 PM. Reason: Just added "guesting"... ugh!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

                      I, too, have an aversion to the use of nouns as verbs. "Trending" and "guesting" make me cringe - I think it''s awful, and my new discovery - "modding". Also "impacting" rather than ''affecting'', which is almost obsolete now. I suppose it's convenient for those who don't know the difference between "affect" and "effect".
                      I went to Tech when I left high school, to learn shorthand and typing. "High technology" became "hi-tech" (as Bonekicker has mentioned) and "technician" has become "tech", too.




                      "App" is another ambiguous abbreviation. I've never seen or heard "download the application", but I presume that's what it means, due to the context. Otherwise, an "app" could just as easily be an application form, an appliance, an apprentice or apprenticeship - many other things - appearance, appraisal, appendix, appetite, appendage, appeal, approval....... I'll stop there!
                      I just learnt a new one - apparently any kind of musician or musical performer is a "muser". Yuk!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Judge Foozle View Post

                        I just learnt a new one - apparently any kind of musician or musical performer is a "muser". Yuk!
                        Oh I prefer "muso"!

                        "Muser" sounds more like a thinker.

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                        • #13
                          In the aviation world, an aircraft that has "gone tech" is one which has a technical fault, or in old English needs mending.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

                            Oh I prefer "muso"!

                            "Muser" sounds more like a thinker.
                            As a musician I hate both..

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                            • #15
                              I just wish that people wouldn’t use an ambiguous abbreviation, especially when the word technology is just as easy to use
                              But 'tech' is easier to use than 'technology', which is why we use it, just as it was easier to say 'the tech' rather than 'the technical college', etc. English goes where the usage goes - if a usage or even a word becomes popular enough, then its real. There is no committee to tut and say no - its adaptability is whats made it so popular. Walpole coined 'seridipity', and people used it - a word was created. So its nothing new, even if sometimes changes in spelling or usage are imposed, such as the 'H' in Thames.

                              And context is important - so its difficult to see many people thinking 'tech' could be short for technicolor these days (and to be honest, the 'color' part was the big selling point, so why they shortened it in that way is a bit strange), and technical colleges went many years ago, although it might hang on in local usage. And as Odeonman points out, 'In the aviation world, an aircraft that has "gone tech" is one which has a technical fault, or in old English needs mending.' makes perfect sense if your in the aviation world, and will be totally understood. Industries often have their own language and jargon which sometimes jumps the fence. And 'app' is so widely understand to mean a computer app that to wonder what else it could mean would be very odd indeed.,

                              Words change their meanings (often radically), or have several different means, depending on context, or simply vanish from usage, becoming obsolete. And new words get created all the time, and of course this has only increased since the coming of radio, film, TV and now the net. You can hate it if you like, but its evolution in action.

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