Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

TV censoring of cinema films.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TV censoring of cinema films.

    On watching the 1961 film Payroll on Talking Pictures TV yesterday, I was amazed to see that when the scene came on where Billie Whitelaw was washing her young daughter in the bath, the daughter was blurred out, as though Billie was washing a bucketful of thick fog. I’ve never seen such censorship displayed by a television company before, with the exception some years ago of Central TV’s screening of The Dam Busters, where all spoken references to Guy Gibson’s dog were deleted from the film. These two examples seem all the more odd because both films are available on DVD with no blurring out of scenes or erasing of dialogue. As far as I’m concerned, both films have already been passed by the BBFC and require no further censoring.

  • #2
    I noticed this and it looked quite ridiculous....who decided to do this, especially as the scene was intact on the DVD ?

    This harmless scene was quite acceptable for cinema audieces in 1960 (in an 'A' cert film) so what has changed since then ?

    Comment


    • #3
      The strange thing is, Julian, that when Payroll was last shown on Channel 4, the scene wasn't shown blurred out. It's a matter of principal. As you say, the scene was quite acceptable to cinema audiences when the film was originally released, so why the blurring now? I wonder if Talking Pictures TV will give A Matter of Life and Death the same treatment if they show it and blur out the naked shepherd boy sat by the sand dune playing his flute.

      Comment


      • #4
        Naked child in bath - times have changed, and probably guidelines since it was shown on C4. What was acceptable now perhaps wasn't acceptable then, and that goes the other way as well. Broadcasters are not censors - but they do have codes, and they do need to think whose watching, and when. You might think its harmless, but will everyone?

        Comment


        • #5
          Obviously we live in more paranoid times, but it's worth noting that back in 1936 the Hays Office objected to the child being bathed in the market scene in Things to Come.

          Comment


          • #6
            I can’t see how any parents watching the scene would object, as, by way of their position, they would be bathing their children at least once a week for years and would only be seeing on the screen what they themselves do in real life. Those that do object to such an every day innocent scene and have a problem with it are quite obviously equating nudity with pornography when they are two different things

            Comment


            • #7
              obviously equating nudity with pornography when they are two different things
              It depends on who you are and your point of view - hence the precautions.

              Comment


              • #8
                I’ve noticed some silly obscuring on TV like the blurring of the toilets in a police cell - even when they haven’t been used

                Steve

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                  On watching the 1961 film Payroll on Talking Pictures TV yesterday,
                  Payroll on Talking Pictures TV was shown quite late as well.

                  Maybe the child is still alive and now obviously an adult and objected to it whereas before they could not?

                  A lot of films over the Christmas./New Year period were censored.
                  Last edited by Metro1962; 4th January 2018, 02:59 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Will the beach scene with Peter Carter (David Niven) and the naked shepherd boy in AMOLAD now be all blurry when it is shown on TV ?

                    Didn't this scene cause problems with the Legion of Decency in the USA back in 1945 ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by julian_craster View Post
                      Will the beach scene with Peter Carter (David Niven) and the naked shepherd boy in AMOLAD now be all blurry when it is shown on TV ?

                      Didn't this scene cause problems with the Legion of Decency in the USA back in 1945 ?
                      Yes, but that was only in America (and you know how puritanical they can be). They couldn't even release it as A Matter of Life and Death, they felt it would be better to release it as Stairway to Heaven because "American audiences won't like a film with "Death" in the title, especially so soon after the war where so many people had died. Emeric responded "What about Death Takes a Holiday (1934)?

                      "Ah," they replied, "That one's OK because death obviously takes a holiday so nobody dies"

                      The idiots!

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                        I can’t see how any parents watching the scene would object, as, by way of their position, they would be bathing their children at least once a week for years and would only be seeing on the screen what they themselves do in real life. Those that do object to such an every day innocent scene and have a problem with it are quite obviously equating nudity with pornography when they are two different things
                        In these times, it's not parents that the "censor" is concerned about.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some films I have on DVD were better treated ontelevision, in the versions I remember seeing. BBC2's 1985 showing of The L-Shaped Room, one of my Top 10 favourites, included sequences that are missing from my copy: Tom Bell and Leslie Caron saying "negroes" and a photograph of Cicely Courtneidge's late girlfriend (ironically, "gorgeous negroes" was retained in Darling, which is on the same "double feature" disc). Joanna Lumley's nude scene in The Breaking of Bumbo is a minute or two longer than it appears on Network's release, and I think something was cut from their DVD of The Final Programme.

                          The "blurring" in Payroll is a new example of censorship to me. Peter Finch bathing Anne Bancroft's children in The Pumpkin Eater seems harmless enough but I don't understand why audiences are confronted with a naked boy in Poor Cow and, even worse, a urinating one in David Hemmings' film The 14. I wouldn't mind those sequences being omitted. Shouldn't the censors also consider removing nude/sex scenes featuring actresses who've died or become very ill in recent years (e.g. Kate O'Mara, Jill Gascoine,, Lynda Bellingham)?

                          Also, I feel very uncomfortable about the cavalier use of the word "rape" in comedies. I'm thinking more of 1970s sitcoms than cinema (Butterflies,The Lovers! and, most horrifically, The Fenn Street Gang come to mind). Was it joked about in Carry On movies and the Confessions films? If so, I think 'humorous' dialogue containing Rape should go. Hypocritically, though, I actually like that surreal scene in The Knack where Rita Tushingham taunts her attacker by repeating the word in public.

                          The most censored film I've seen is Get Carter. Three years after my original viewing (ITV, 1983), there was a season of Michael Caine films on BBC1, giving me the opportunity to re-record onto tape a movie that cut off just before the end. This "TV version", as it was billed in Radio Times, lasted 95 minutes. I nevertheless enjoyed watching my recording several times. Not until I bought the DVD did I see the compete film again and was so upset by the violence and sadism, particularly Margaret''s death (Dorothy White), that I actually prefer the edited version! The other 'restored' scenes included Britt Ekland's 'phone sex, Albert (Glynn Edwards) being stabbed to death, and the violent attack on Glenda (Geraldine Moffatt) when she's dragged out of the bath by Carter. Again with the bath scenes ...
                          Last edited by cornershop15; 5th January 2018, 01:22 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There have been some very odd examples of cinema film censorship over the decades. One that lasted, if I remember correctly, until the late 1950s was the practice of showing married couples sleeping in separate beds in the same bedroom when everyone knew that married couples generally slept together in a double bed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Michael Winner's Lawman was shown on TV recently and several scenes were chopped about, particularly the final gunfight scenes and also where Burt Lancaster has to shoot his wounded horse. (Winner deals quite extensively on this particular scene in his book Winner Take All as he and Burt had an argument over which gun was to be used .)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X