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Can you remember theme tunes from yesteryear TV?

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  • #76
    The ‘60s and ‘70s must have been the Golden Age of TV theme tunes, and countless examples managed to imprint themselves upon my youthful brain, from the ultra-dynamic intro to Barnaby Jones (as though to compensate for Buddy Ebsen’s advanced years) to this amazingly evocative little piece, which is indelibly associated - in my mind at least - with the excited anticipation felt each week as another of those Universal/Hammer horror double bills rolled around again on a Saturday night in the summer of ’77. Not sure why - maybe they were preceded by a trailer for the documentary in question?



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    • #77
      this one just came to mind , not patrucilarly good but sticks out as early electronica .


       

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      • #78
        My most memorable themes - most of which more memorable than the content of the programmes:

        Captain Zeppos (same era as White Horses)

        Tales of the Riverbank (original from Canada)

        Vendetta (an influence on Persuaders maybe?)

        The Baron

        Department S (best theme of the ITC portfolio)

        The Prisoner (possibly the best opening and end title sequence of the era

        Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased)

        Flaxton Boys:- a rival to the Black Beauty and Follyfoot stable of themes.

        Gangsters - this instrumental was much better than the vocal:
        Last edited by Spinalman; 13th September 2019, 10:24 AM.

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        • Gerald Lovell
          Gerald Lovell commented
          Editing a comment
          I thought I was the only one who remembered CAPTAIN ZEPPOS! Somehow I also remember whistling it at a bus stop, presumably in the 60s, and being surprised when it was played in the Playhouse Cinema in Edinburgh before the curtain went up for that day's performance.

        • garth
          garth commented
          Editing a comment
          Wow, you're way ahead of me, Spinalman. But then I looked at your profile: "Director / editor / cameraman". Yes. the Flaxton Boys intro does look low budget, but their movement does follow the flow of the music, to MY eye and ear. That brief diagonal divide is very lame, admittedly. Otherwise, the flow is fine. And why should it follow the example of "The Persuaders"? There are many ways to crack an egg. For me, the intro to "The Persuaders" is far too busy for the pristine music, and that split screen is a big no-no - I can only focus on one half at a time. I suppose I'd need your retake of Flaxton to see and understand how you'd do it, but that ain't gonna happen. Then again, you're the pro and I'm not! ;-)

        • Spinalman
          Spinalman commented
          Editing a comment
          Captain Zeppos. I remember it was a pseudo Freewheelers affair set in an Eastern European country with a few teenagers hanging out with an old man. Dubbed badly. The credit sequence was them driving an Austin military jeep through underpasses - actually in Brussels. But the music! The theme was Bert Kaempfert "Living it Up" - it was the first 45 single I had (second was Congratulations) and I played it repeatedly - that is the soundtrack to my childhood. http://www.zeppos.hiddentigerbooks.c...ies_01_bbc.htm
          Last edited by Spinalman; Today, 10:17 AM.

      • #79
        One of the very best imo. The incidental music was even better!
        Shipwrecked on an uninhabited island, Robinson Crusoe fills his time in either building a shelter for himself, or by reminiscing about the years he spent at ...

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        • Spinalman
          Spinalman commented
          Editing a comment
          Indeed. The CD of the whole suite of themes and cues is brilliant. The first bar of each cue takes you way back. For such a long series they were economical with music ... the wreck theme, building stuff, flashback, natives, desolation.

      • #80
        Creative editing is possible - I'd mention the "first run" in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner - whereby they had a jazz theme and cut Tom Courtenay running through woods in a superb sequence - the camera was always moving to the action and the music. Starts at 1.40
        Last edited by Spinalman; Yesterday, 04:13 PM.

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        • garth
          garth commented
          Editing a comment
          Jazz music coupled with our homely English woods? It jars for me, I'm afraid. Or is it suggested that this is the sort of music young lads might have listened to back then?

        • Spinalman
          Spinalman commented
          Editing a comment
          I think the jazz works as this scene was to demonstrate and contrast the freedom Tom's character gets after being oppressed. I think the free form approach suits his larking about in the Surrey woods (now the A3 at Claygate) - the handheld and tracking camera was free to follow wherever the whim took him.
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