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It's a great week for P&P films on TV in the UK next week

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

    So if a film is shown in fullscreen but should be shown in 2.35.1 you are losing major picture content/information in how the Director intended it to be.
    As long as they don't cut any of the words spoken or crop them too drastically, no, I don't mind
    I'm coming from the old days when we were glad to see a film in any format

    Seeing it in the "correct" format is nice of course, but I'm grateful for whatever I can get

    Steve

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

      As long as they don't cut any of the words spoken or crop them too drastically, no, I don't mind
      I'm coming from the old days when we were glad to see a film in any format

      Seeing it in the "correct" format is nice of course, but I'm grateful for whatever I can get

      Steve
      I've noticed that there has been a recent trend on ITV3 and Film4 to crop a film that has previously been shown in 4:3 so it fits into a 16:9 frame, by cropping the top and bottom but keeping the same width as before. Shaun of the Dead (a *lot* more recent than the films we're talking about, obviously) is an example. Given that SotD was originally made in 2.35:1, I imagine it was severely cropped at the sides to fit it into 4:3, and then further cropped top and bottom to make that 4:3 version fit into 16:9. Peasants!

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      • #18
        I’ve just watched A Canterbury Taleon Talking Pictures TV. It had the common black bars on either side but looked very good (sort from the ads every 20 minutes or so) but if I need to see it without ads then I can always watch my DVD.

        Its original aspect ratio was 1.37 : 1 so there wasn’t anything lost by screening it on TV

        Steve

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
          I’ve just watched A Canterbury Taleon Talking Pictures TV. It had the common black bars on either side but looked very good (sort from the ads every 20 minutes or so) but if I need to see it without ads then I can always watch my DVD.

          Its original aspect ratio was 1.37 : 1 so there wasn’t anything lost by screening it on TV

          Steve
          That's correct then. Sometimes broadcasters either stretch the image to fill the screen, or they'll crop the top and bottom of the picture in order to fit it onto a 16:9 screen.

          I suspected a P&P fan like yourself would already have the DVD's anyway.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by martinu View Post

            I've noticed that there has been a recent trend on ITV3 and Film4 to crop a film that has previously been shown in 4:3 so it fits into a 16:9 frame, by cropping the top and bottom but keeping the same width as before. Shaun of the Dead (a *lot* more recent than the films we're talking about, obviously) is an example. Given that SotD was originally made in 2.35:1, I imagine it was severely cropped at the sides to fit it into 4:3, and then further cropped top and bottom to make that 4:3 version fit into 16:9. Peasants!
            That's a really shoddy way to present a film in this day and age. Nothing surprises me with ITV, but Film 4 used to pride itself in broadcasting films in their original format as the director intended, and also showing them uncut - at least that's what they used to say when Film 4 began as a subscription service back in the late 90's. I guess nowadays Channel 4/Film 4 is no different to ITV or even Channel 5.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

              As long as they don't cut any of the words spoken or crop them too drastically, no, I don't mind
              I'm coming from the old days when we were glad to see a film in any format

              Seeing it in the "correct" format is nice of course, but I'm grateful for whatever I can get

              Steve



              I can understand that point of view, up to a point. At least you understand that it isn’t correct, but are willing to accept it.

              I’m afraid I’m obsessive about aspect ratios and find myself unable to watch a film presented incorrectly.




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              • #22
                Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                and find myself unable to watch a film presented incorrectly.
                Isn't that a bit obsessive? And don't you find yourself missing out on a lot of good films where the only thing "wrong" with them is that they weren't presented exactly as you would like?

                Steve

                Comment


                • julian_craster
                  julian_craster commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I noticed the EAGLE LION logo at the beginning of ACT, which was the brand name for RANK releases in the USA..

                  As TPTV screened the original UK print (without the Kim Hunter prologue) surely it should have had the GFD/Rank logo at the beginning ?

                  In the 1940s I don't think any UK release prints were released with the EAGLE LION logo, though I stand to be corrected....!

                  Can Steve clarify ?
                  Last edited by julian_craster; 2nd February 2020, 12:25 PM.

              • #23
                Can Steve clarify ?
                No, I can't "clarify" because TBH I don't pay much attention to the distributor logos, I just look for the Archer's logo and then I focus on the film itself

                Steve

                Comment


                • #24
                  Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                  Isn't that a bit obsessive?
                  Some would say so. Others would not.

                  Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                  ...where the only thing "wrong" with them is that they weren't presented exactly as you would like?

                  Steve
                  No, no, a thousand times no! It’s not a case of my personal taste. A director frames a film how he wants it to be seen by an audience. To present it any other way is an abomination.

                  Comment


                  • #25
                    Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                    No, no, a thousand times no! It’s not a case of my personal taste. A director frames a film how he wants it to be seen by an audience. To present it any other way is an abomination.
                    But in that case you'll think it's an abomination to watch any film on video, DVD or Blu-ray before the invention of those devices.
                    Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices

                    Don't you think that's extremely limiting?

                    Steve

                    Comment


                    • #26
                      Originally posted by Carl V View Post
                      At least the BBC will broadcast them in their original 4:3 ratios rather than in a "stretched" version to fill a 16:9 TV screen, which Talking Pictures seem to do - at least the last time I watched anything on that channel.
                      Most standard definition transmissions of 4x3 material are broadcast stretched, you simply select "4x3" on your TV's aspect ratio menu to watch them in the correct ratio.

                      Comment


                      • #27
                        Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                        But in that case you'll think it's an abomination to watch any film on video, DVD or Blu-ray before the invention of those devices.
                        Sorry Steve, you’ve lost me there.

                        Comment


                        • #28
                          Originally posted by Odeonman View Post
                          Most standard definition transmissions of 4x3 material are broadcast stretched, you simply select "4x3" on your TV's aspect ratio menu to watch them in the correct ratio.
                          Yes, that's true - it's just I found some channels already broadcast non-widescreen films in the correct '4x3' ratio whilst others stretch it instead. However, I'd rather switch it myself as you suggest, rather than have the other option sometimes taken by broadcasters which is to crop the picture to fill the screen .

                          Comment


                          • #29
                            Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                            . . . Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices. . .
                            The great Sir William Walton wasn't happy that his symphonies were being performed on radio. He said listeners needed to be in the concert hall away from distractions to appreciate them.

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                            • #30
                              Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post


                              Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices



                              Steve
                              I remember seeing an interview with Scorcese in which he said he was "obsessed with 'Scope" but shot his films in wide screen (i.e. 1.85:1) because of the butchering that 'Scope films got on 4x3 television. He switched to 'Scope with his remake of Cape Fear and has generally stayed with it ever since. Sydney Pollack shot all of his films in 'Scope until switching to 1.85:1 for Absence of Malice, He then shot Tootsie in 'Scope but reverted to wide screen for Out of Africa and all his subsequent films, again because of the ruinous effect of pan and scan on 4x3 TV. He went back to 'Scope for The Interpreter, which sadly turned out to be his last film. In the DVD extras of The Interpreter Pollack explained that he felt able to return to 'Scope due to the advent of 16x9 TVs and the more widespread use of letterboxing.

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