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It's a great week for P&P films on TV in the UK next week

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  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

    Did it say that on the beginning or end credits?
    No, it’s usually at the end but it was cut from the BBC2 screening. However, I can tell the difference. Especially when I see the lady in the red and white striped dress at Lady Neston’s party where she first meets Lermontov

    Steve

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  • Metro1962
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    I just watched The Red Shoes on BBC2. It was the restored print, restored by Scorsese’s Film Foundation.

    Steve
    Did it say that on the beginning or end credits?

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Today’s film on BBC2 was Black Narcissus . Another fine film from Powell & Pressburger and The Archers

    Steve

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  • narabdela
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    I just watched The Red Shoes on BBC2. It was the restored print, restored by Scorsese’s Film Foundation. It was made in 1.37:1 so was shown with a black bar to either side of the screen.

    It it looked great

    Steve

    BBC2 usually gets it right.

    Leave a comment:


  • jamal.nazreddin
    replied
    Originally posted by orpheum View Post
    It would be better if they showed the many British films that have not received an airing on tv.
    Indeed, I have been waiting for a few films for decades.

    And eventually one is either disappointed or suffers with a form of 'post-purchase rationalisation'.

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  • Steve Crook
    replied
    I just watched The Red Shoes on BBC2. It was the restored print, restored by Scorsese’s Film Foundation. It was made in 1.37:1 so was shown with a black bar to either side of the screen.

    It it looked great

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • orpheum
    replied
    It would be better if they showed the many British films that have not received an airing on tv.

    Leave a comment:


  • Odeonman
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post


    Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices



    Steve
    I remember seeing an interview with Scorcese in which he said he was "obsessed with 'Scope" but shot his films in wide screen (i.e. 1.85:1) because of the butchering that 'Scope films got on 4x3 television. He switched to 'Scope with his remake of Cape Fear and has generally stayed with it ever since. Sydney Pollack shot all of his films in 'Scope until switching to 1.85:1 for Absence of Malice, He then shot Tootsie in 'Scope but reverted to wide screen for Out of Africa and all his subsequent films, again because of the ruinous effect of pan and scan on 4x3 TV. He went back to 'Scope for The Interpreter, which sadly turned out to be his last film. In the DVD extras of The Interpreter Pollack explained that he felt able to return to 'Scope due to the advent of 16x9 TVs and the more widespread use of letterboxing.

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  • jamal.nazreddin
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    . . . Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices. . .
    The great Sir William Walton wasn't happy that his symphonies were being performed on radio. He said listeners needed to be in the concert hall away from distractions to appreciate them.

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  • Carl V
    replied
    Originally posted by Odeonman View Post
    Most standard definition transmissions of 4x3 material are broadcast stretched, you simply select "4x3" on your TV's aspect ratio menu to watch them in the correct ratio.
    Yes, that's true - it's just I found some channels already broadcast non-widescreen films in the correct '4x3' ratio whilst others stretch it instead. However, I'd rather switch it myself as you suggest, rather than have the other option sometimes taken by broadcasters which is to crop the picture to fill the screen .

    Leave a comment:


  • narabdela
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    But in that case you'll think it's an abomination to watch any film on video, DVD or Blu-ray before the invention of those devices.
    Sorry Steve, you’ve lost me there.

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  • Odeonman
    replied
    Originally posted by Carl V View Post
    At least the BBC will broadcast them in their original 4:3 ratios rather than in a "stretched" version to fill a 16:9 TV screen, which Talking Pictures seem to do - at least the last time I watched anything on that channel.
    Most standard definition transmissions of 4x3 material are broadcast stretched, you simply select "4x3" on your TV's aspect ratio menu to watch them in the correct ratio.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by narabdela View Post
    No, no, a thousand times no! It’s not a case of my personal taste. A director frames a film how he wants it to be seen by an audience. To present it any other way is an abomination.
    But in that case you'll think it's an abomination to watch any film on video, DVD or Blu-ray before the invention of those devices.
    Most directors made their films expecting them to be seen in the cinema, not on TV or other devices

    Don't you think that's extremely limiting?

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • narabdela
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    Isn't that a bit obsessive?
    Some would say so. Others would not.

    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    ...where the only thing "wrong" with them is that they weren't presented exactly as you would like?

    Steve
    No, no, a thousand times no! It’s not a case of my personal taste. A director frames a film how he wants it to be seen by an audience. To present it any other way is an abomination.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Can Steve clarify ?
    No, I can't "clarify" because TBH I don't pay much attention to the distributor logos, I just look for the Archer's logo and then I focus on the film itself

    Steve

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