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NEVER LET GO (1960) on Talking Pictures

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  • NEVER LET GO (1960) on Talking Pictures

    Talking Pictures does it again ! .Thursday 18th January @ 9.30pm Peter Sellers as a nasty gang boss in Never Let Go (1960) with Richard Todd, Elizabeth Sellars and Adam Faith. John Barry provides the music. Enjoy.

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    • #3
      Mmm. Not one of John Barry's better efforts.

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      • #4
        It was midway between his rock 'n' roll and big orchestral soundtrack scores periods. As I remember it, the song over the opening titles is actually Adam Faith singing 'When Johnny Comes Marching Home', while the 'Never Let Go' track is heard in the background on a juke box in a coffee bar scene in the middle of the film. One critic said of the film that it appeared only to have been made in order to give Peter Sellers a villainous part and he's so over the top in it that his villain appears more comical than threatening.

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        • #5
          Harold Shampan a publicity executive at Rank, with an interest in music, claimed responsibility for introducing 'popular,' saleable, music to Rank's films. He certainly gave Ron Goodwin his first shot at a feature and claims to have recruited John Barry. He said 'When Johnny Comes Marching Home' was the first notable result of his suggestions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
            It was midway between his rock 'n' roll and big orchestral soundtrack scores periods. As I remember it, the song over the opening titles is actually Adam Faith singing 'When Johnny Comes Marching Home', while the 'Never Let Go' track is heard in the background on a juke box in a coffee bar scene in the middle of the film. One critic said of the film that it appeared only to have been made in order to give Peter Sellers a villainous part and he's so over the top in it that his villain appears more comical than threatening.
            I always got the impression that it was made as an ad for the Ford Anglia. Richard Todd rarely refers to his car, it's always 'the Anglia' as I remember. I could be wrong as I last saw this film in the 70's.

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            • #7
              You're right, Andy. When he gets home to his wife, he tells her "The Anglia's gone!"

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              • #8
                I watched this one last night and really enjoyed it, definitely had a helping hand from Ford motor company though I'd say !.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sweeney77 View Post
                  I watched this one last night and really enjoyed it, definitely had a helping hand from Ford motor company though I'd say !.
                  I enjoyed this as well. I have the original DVD release. Looking at the Radio Times rating, it was only given one star out of a possible 5 !. I tend to disagree with most of their ratings anyway.

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                  • #10
                    It's being shown in 1.5 aspect ratio.
                    What's all that about ? How on earth can it end up at that ratio ?

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                    • #11
                      Just watched this for the first time since the mid 70's. Much, much better than I remember it and really quite violent. It's funny, I just can't settle with Richard Todd in an 'everyman' role - probably been watching too much Dambusters! Peter Sellers is delightfully OTT as the villain, and Adam Faith does a good job of being a pathetic loser.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PhilipW View Post
                        It's being shown in 1.5 aspect ratio.
                        What's all that about ? How on earth can it end up at that ratio ?
                        It was shown 1.66:1 which may be the correct ratio although most British films in 1960 were intended for projection at 1.75:1.

                        It's decades since I last saw the film. Apart from Peter Sellers playing a heavy, it was interesting to see Richard Todd playing out of character; far from his usual confident roles. It was difficult to sympathise with Todd though, because he takes such stupid actions in the film! I can see why Sellers didn't repeat the experiment of a serious role; he terribly convincing as a tough guy. Well made film though. John Guillermin was an, excellent ahead of his time, director.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by vanmunchen View Post

                          It was shown 1.66:1 which may be the correct ratio although most British films in 1960 were intended for projection at 1.75:1.
                          Not so, I'm afraid. The black side bars were far too big for 1.66. I actually got my tape measure out and measured it as it looked so strange.

                          It was definately 1.50:1.

                          This is not the first time that Talking Pictures have shown films in strange ratios. SPARE THE ROD, I recall, was also shown somewhere between 1.40 and 1.50. There have been a few others.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PhilipW View Post

                            Not so, I'm afraid. The black side bars were far too big for 1.66. I actually got my tape measure out and measured it as it looked so strange.

                            It was definately 1.50:1.

                            This is not the first time that Talking Pictures have shown films in strange ratios. SPARE THE ROD, I recall, was also shown somewhere between 1.40 and 1.50. There have been a few others.
                            Do they mask the edges or do they stretch/squash?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by martinu View Post

                              Do they mask the edges or do they stretch/squash?
                              The picture is transmitted unstretched and unquashed. Back bars appear on each side.

                              Some people however have their TV settings such that the image is stretched to fit the whole TV screen. I personally hate that, others don't mind. That is entirely a function of the TV settings rather than how Talking Pictures is transmitting the image.

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