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  • #31
    Originally posted by Swenson View Post
    Was their a similar film, filmed in Britain, starring Glenn Ford, bomb disposal expert, defusing a German bomb, somewhere in Britain? As I recall, it was filmed in black and white, released, I think around 1964.
    You're right. It was called The Time Bomb (Terror on a Train in the U.S.) made in 1953.

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    • #32
      There's also Ten Seconds to Hell (1959), about bomb disposal experts in post war Berlin. It was a Hammer production directed by Robert Aldrich and featuring Jack Palace and Jeff Chandler. It's a promising idea that doesn't really work, possibly because the studio insisted on extensive cuts to the film. As a result, Producer/Director Aldrich refused his producer credit.
      Last edited by Ian Fryer; 9th August 2019, 03:42 PM.

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      • #33
        The Time Bomb has a really daft plot.A saboteur plants a time bomb in a train of sea mines whilst the train is travelling through Birmingham on its way to Portsmouth.When this is discovered it is stopped in a residential area in case it explodes!Instead of calling on the Royal Navy mine disposal team they call in Glenn Ford who was a bomb disposal officer in the war.Total nonsense.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by orpheum View Post
          The Time Bomb has a really daft plot.A saboteur plants a time bomb in a train of sea mines whilst the train is travelling through Birmingham on its way to Portsmouth.When this is discovered it is stopped in a residential area in case it explodes!Instead of calling on the Royal Navy mine disposal team they call in Glenn Ford who was a bomb disposal officer in the war.Total nonsense.
          The lead had to be American - so Glenn Ford was shoe-horned into the story. Despite an excellent technical team and facilities, the early mid-budget M-G-M British films suffered greatly from the constraints imposed by having to appeal to an American audience. 'Never Let Me Go' is probably the best of the bunch.

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