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  • #31
    Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

    I'm amazed it's called "Radio Times" instead of "TV Times"!
    Don't forget your TV Times
    Don't forget your TV Times
    It's the only way to see
    What's coming on ITV
    So go and get your TV Times

    I think that's how the old advert used to go, I think in those days ITV was on Channel 9.

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    • #32
      This weekend I’ve watched...

      Saturday 7 Nov, TPTV @ 22:20
      Peeping Tom (1960)

      Saturday 7 Nov, BBC2 @ 23:20
      Silence (2016) by Martin Scorsese

      Sunday 8 Nov, TPTV @ 14:20
      The Thief of Bagdad (1940)

      Steve


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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mark O View Post



        'Radio' sounds more military, such as'Radio operator', and Wireless in the home.

        Just saying like........
        Funnily enough Mark - until late in WW2 - the RAF used 'wireless' as a description for much of its comms equipment and personnel.
        During WW1 much of Artillery spotting/control from the air was done by Wireless (morse key).
        In the RAF even post WW2 - Stencilled on the aircraft skins was W/T (wireless telegraphy) wherever there was electronic comms equipment/aerials etc.
        In WW2 The Airborne 'radio' operators were actually called Wireless Operators (WOp) ,late in the war (1944?) their title was changed to 'Signaller' and they were given an 'S' Flying Badge (Half Wing).
        I guess you could say that the RAF view until after WW2 was that 'Wireless' was basically Morse and that 'Radio' was for speech when the VHF sets became the norm,although morse was retained in some roles for long range comms (HF).
        Last edited by BVS; 11 November 2020, 08:54 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by BVS View Post

          Funnily enough Mark - until late in WW2 - the RAF used 'wireless' as a description for much of its comms equipment and personnel.
          During WW1 much of Artillery spotting/control from the air was done by Wireless (morse key).
          In the RAF even post WW2 - Stencilled on the aircraft skins was W/T (wireless telegraphy) wherever there was electronic comms equipment/aerials etc.
          In WW2 The Airborne 'radio' operators were actually called Wireless Operators (WOp) ,late in the war (1944?) their title was changed to 'Signaller' and they were given an 'S' Flying Badge (Half Wing).
          I guess you could say that the RAF view until after WW2 was that 'Wireless' was basically Morse and that 'Radio' was for speech when the VHF sets became the norm,although morse was retained in some roles for long range comms (HF).
          Thank you for your very informative post BVS........

          I'm always fascinated by historic communications equipment at places I've visited such as Bletchley Park, Goonhilly, etc;

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