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  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by BVS View Post

    Funnily enough Mark - until late in WW2 - the RAF used 'wireless' as a description for much of its comms equipment and personnel.
    During WW1 much of Artillery spotting/control from the air was done by Wireless (morse key).
    In the RAF even post WW2 - Stencilled on the aircraft skins was W/T (wireless telegraphy) wherever there was electronic comms equipment/aerials etc.
    In WW2 The Airborne 'radio' operators were actually called Wireless Operators (WOp) ,late in the war (1944?) their title was changed to 'Signaller' and they were given an 'S' Flying Badge (Half Wing).
    I guess you could say that the RAF view until after WW2 was that 'Wireless' was basically Morse and that 'Radio' was for speech when the VHF sets became the norm,although morse was retained in some roles for long range comms (HF).
    Thank you for your very informative post BVS........

    I'm always fascinated by historic communications equipment at places I've visited such as Bletchley Park, Goonhilly, etc;

    Leave a comment:


  • BVS
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post



    'Radio' sounds more military, such as'Radio operator', and Wireless in the home.

    Just saying like........
    Funnily enough Mark - until late in WW2 - the RAF used 'wireless' as a description for much of its comms equipment and personnel.
    During WW1 much of Artillery spotting/control from the air was done by Wireless (morse key).
    In the RAF even post WW2 - Stencilled on the aircraft skins was W/T (wireless telegraphy) wherever there was electronic comms equipment/aerials etc.
    In WW2 The Airborne 'radio' operators were actually called Wireless Operators (WOp) ,late in the war (1944?) their title was changed to 'Signaller' and they were given an 'S' Flying Badge (Half Wing).
    I guess you could say that the RAF view until after WW2 was that 'Wireless' was basically Morse and that 'Radio' was for speech when the VHF sets became the norm,although morse was retained in some roles for long range comms (HF).
    Last edited by BVS; 11 November 2020, 08:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    This weekend I’ve watched...

    Saturday 7 Nov, TPTV @ 22:20
    Peeping Tom (1960)

    Saturday 7 Nov, BBC2 @ 23:20
    Silence (2016) by Martin Scorsese

    Sunday 8 Nov, TPTV @ 14:20
    The Thief of Bagdad (1940)

    Steve


    Leave a comment:


  • cassidy
    replied
    Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

    I'm amazed it's called "Radio Times" instead of "TV Times"!
    Don't forget your TV Times
    Don't forget your TV Times
    It's the only way to see
    What's coming on ITV
    So go and get your TV Times

    I think that's how the old advert used to go, I think in those days ITV was on Channel 9.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by narabdela View Post

    'Silence' is a tough watch, but well worth it. I don't remember it attracting much attention when it was released.
    Yes, it was another film with Marty trying to assuage his Catholic guilt. Interesting, but not great IMHO.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • cassidy
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks to both Nick and Steve for your help. I wonder if Bill will read out my email thanking him for his praise of Talking Pictures when his programme returns on the 15th.

  • Nick Dando
    replied
    The Listener was not a listings magazine. I bought a copy in the 1980s and found it a difficult read as it was aimed at a higher-brow audience. It provided a much more in-depth discussion of certain programmes and featured a lot of technical jargon related to the broadcasting industry.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Li...%28magazine%29

    Leave a comment:


  • tv horror
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    It was obviously a commonly used enough word in 1924 for them to decide to call the listings magazine Radio TImes or nobody would know what they were listing

    Steve
    What about The Listener magazine did that list any radio shows or was it more a highlights orientated issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shirley Brahms
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
    You have to think about (not guess) what was common in 1923 when they decided on the name.

    Anyway, everyone now knows that it's the best magazine for radio & TV listings

    Steve
    I don't need to think about it (or guess), because it's something of which I'm already well aware.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tigon Man
    commented on 's reply
    I'm glad to see that it's not just us here in the old country, who have a surfeit of cookery shows!
    Mind you wasn't it the Aussies, who introduced us to the Galloping Gourmet..

  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Shirley Brahms View Post

    Why not? If anything at all, the other way around, because "wireless" was more widely-used than "radio" back then ( in this particular context). It took another couple of decades for "radio" to overtake "wireless" in common usage and certainly by the 1950s the latter was a very old-fashioned term.
    You have to think about (not guess) what was common in 1923 when they decided on the name.

    Anyway, everyone now knows that it's the best magazine for radio & TV listings

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Shirley Brahms
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    It was obviously a commonly used enough word in 1924 for them to decide to call the listings magazine Radio TImes or nobody would know what they were listing.

    Steve
    Why not? If anything at all, the other way around, because "wireless" was more widely-used than "radio" back then ( in this particular context). It took another couple of decades for "radio" to overtake "wireless" in common usage and certainly by the 1950s the latter was a very old-fashioned term.

    Nowadays, "Radio Times" seems an old-fashioned title because it doesn't convey the inclusion of TV programmes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

    It was obviously a commonly used enough word in 1924 for them to decide to call the listings magazine Radio TImes or nobody would know what they were listing

    Steve
    Maybe, though the late Queen Mother referred to what's known as a Radio 'the wireless', all her life........

    'Radio' sounds more military, such as'Radio operator', and Wireless in the home.

    Just saying like........

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark O
    replied
    Originally posted by narabdela View Post

    It doesn't look as if you'll be needing those rose-tinted spectacles I was going to buy you for Christmas Mark.
    Lol, though compared to all the terrorism and strife of more recent decades, most of it was good and innocent........

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Crook
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark O View Post
    Should be called 'Wireless times' really, Radio wasn't a common word in the good old days of the 1920's and 30's.
    It was obviously a commonly used enough word in 1924 for them to decide to call the listings magazine Radio TImes or nobody would know what they were listing

    Steve

    Leave a comment:

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