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  • 3-D telly

    Some years ago they were for sale in the shops. Somewhat expensive. Some DVD films were being release on 3-D discs, Special DVP players were needed to play such discs. You would need a telly to support the 3-D images. I don’t think 3-D caught on with the public and eventually fizzled out. Did it do well in Europe?

  • #2
    I remember years ago (early 1970's?) when "Fort Ti" was shown on ITV. The TV times issued coloured "3D" cardboard specs with one red & one green plastic lens!

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    • Eric7885
      Eric7885 commented
      Editing a comment
      About the same time, in the 1970’s, here in Canada, they did televised a 3-D film. Gorilla at Large, originally released to the cinemas in 1954. Glasses for the telly film, were given, one set, in the TV guide, or, for sale at the super market for one dollar. I found the cardboard glasses, as you describe them, somewhat annoying. Before the film ended, my head began to ache. Slight headache. That was the last of 3-D film’s being televised on the telly. As for 3-D effects, some were visible, the telly stations never televised any more 3-D films.

  • #3
    I don't think any 3D DVDs were ever issued, only Blu-rays. It was a passing phase that soon fizzled out. Much like curved screen TVs.

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    • Eric7885
      Eric7885 commented
      Editing a comment
      Correct, 3D films we’re only released on Blue Ray discs. Yes I remember the curved telly. I saw one for sale in Best Buy. Expensive. After about a year, no more curved telly in Best Buy. That was, I think about 3 or 4 years ago. I could be wrong. Another fad came and went.

  • #4
    3D TV and films are tried every few years. But they never seem to be a great success. They only ever seem to work for a few carefully designed films.

    Steve

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    • #5
      Once you purchased the 3-D telly, you would also have to purchase the special eye glasses to view the pictures. As I recalled, they were not cheap. Around 100 dollars.
      Last edited by Eric7885; 23 July 2021, 07:25 PM. Reason: Information

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      • #6
        The problem with 3D television, films, stereoscopic photographs (remember the Viewmaster?) is not a technical one - it's a psychological one. For some reason, the eye tends to see the pictures as being a flat foreground some distance in front of a flat background. I went to a talk and demo by the IEE about 20 years ago and they said it's a well-known phenomenon called "cardboarding" - so called because the foreground looks like a cardboard cutout in front of a cardboard background.

        When I saw 3D TV on my sister's Sky TV, with polarising LCD glasses which show one frame to the left eye, then the next to the right and so on in rapid succession, I found it very unnerving. We were watching a football match and there was an exaggerated sense of depth which seemed most unnatural.

        Maybe technology will improve, but what is really needed is a firmware update for the human brain so it accepts 3D TV/films/pictures as being natural rather than exaggerated and contrived.

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        • #7
          As I recall, 3D in the cinemas did not last that long. About two years. At first, it was a rage. Everyone wanted to see 3D films. It was highly publicized. Telly, newspaper adds. 3D cinema is finally here. Many complaints about the glasses provided by the cinemas. Especially if you had to use eyeglasses. Some cinemas did provide clip on glasses for those with spectacles. Probably the most successful 3-D film was, House of Wax, starring Vincent Price. House of Wax was released a few years later on conventional film. 3-D came and fizzled out.
          Last edited by Eric7885; 22 September 2021, 12:04 PM. Reason: Information

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          • #8
            Wow - this is like a thread from about 8 years ago!

            3D did not catch on, although if you bought one, there was a good chance you ended up with a better screen anyway - so you didnt really lose out. The relatively few remaining blu ray players still on the market often still have 3D capacity.

            what has happened is that 4K is now standard screen resolution for new TVs, and thats what we were wiliing to pay for.

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            • #9
              With Coronavirus issues still plaguing this province, I don’t venture outside the house much. Only for food shopping. I did venture over to Best Buy. Most of the tellies for sale were 4K models. Blue Ray DVD players were for sale. Majority of them 4K. No DVD players. A couple of standard high definition tellies also for sale. Prices for the 4K tellies have come down.

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              • #10
                My TV has 3D and I have the glasses and a couple of blurays.

                Avatar looks good on it but on my Dad's tv it is stunning.

                The dandelion-like seeds float across the living room.

                I did record the 2012 Olympic stuff that they compiled in 3D. The hd is failing so I need to recover them.

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                • #11
                  3-D hasn’t died out but it’s become a very niche market. I have a big 3-D Blu ray collection and there are still new 3-D Blu-ray releases, Sky TV still has a selection of about forty 3-D films to watch at any one time. New TVs don’t include 3-D but many projectors and Blu ray players do.

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