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Which formats do you still own/Like?

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  • #16
    I have never thrown anything away,even if the technology is obsolete,with one exception.The Phillips tapes for their VCR which came out in 1973.The machine cost £400 and the tapes £15 for an hour.

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    • #17
      I remember the first VCR I had was the JVC HR-3300.It was a brilliant machine for it's time and cost around £750 a lot of money in those days. E180s cost around £15 each if you could source any. The Phillips 2000 was a brilliant machine with great potential but unfortunately it never caught on. I still have 2 VHS recorders but most stuff has been transferred to DVD solely to conserve space..

      We often think of the space taken up with videos but I remember when I collected films on 16mm. Three four or more 2000 ft reels for just one film!! So we don't really have a lot to complain about.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
        Almost all of the films I have on VHS video have now been replaced with DVD versions..
        Watch out with some DVD versions of films and tv episodes/shows as some VHS tapes have unaltered versions whereas some DVD/Blu Rays have altered soundtracks or different scenes.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by orpheum View Post
          I have never thrown anything away,even if the technology is obsolete,with one exception.The Phillips tapes for their VCR which came out in 1973.The machine cost £400 and the tapes £15 for an hour.
          Is that the format that used a square black cassette with one spool on top of the other, like a very large Super 8 cassette? I remember my school had one of those VCRs which was used for filming our performances in French role playing for us to criticise ourselves and our language howlers. It had a separate analogue clock with big protruding cylindrical knobs for making timed recordings.

          Later on when I was a prefect, my "patch" was in the audio-visual room (I was in my element surrounded by technology) and we had two VHS VCRs which had *wired* remote controls (none of this newfangled IR stuff!) and could play at 2x speed while keeping reasonably intelligible dialogue.

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          • #20
            Most of the films and TV programmes that I have bought are on DVD - or a few are on BluRay, but those can only be played on the player connected to the TV, whereas I can play DVDs on my PC as well.

            Anything I record off-air (and I have about 1.5 TB of recordings!) is in WTV (Microsoft Media Centre) or TS (NextPVR) format. I edit out commercials and continuity announcements with VideoRedo. I have Plex Server on the PC so we can watch anything via the Roku box on the TV, though again I tend to use my PC for watching most things that only interest me and not my wife.

            On the PC, I usually use VLC as the viewer. This has the ability to play at faster than normal speed (useful for watching a 1-hour documentary in 45 mins).

            I have a few films and TV programmes that I recorded on VHS (or pre-recorded bought on VHS) and I've transferred most of those to MPEG to store on my PC. Sadly my better VHS-to-MPEG converter can't handle Macrovision on commercial VHS tapes, so I have to use the cheaper one for those, and the picture quality isn't as good (more flicker and PAL artefacts). I still have the Panasonic VCR that I used to use for all my timeshifting recording before I went over to Windows Media Centre on the PC.

            Being a cautious soul, I have all the PC recordings backed up onto a separate drive, just in case or drive failure...

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            • #21
              Have a look at www.multi-vision.co.uk. They may have something which might solve your problem.

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              • #22
                Living in a non-English speaking country (at least as a first language) I download all my movies from the internet, the availability is staggering. The only DVDs/blurays I buy these days are those with extras or commentaries and I collect those once a year or friends bring them out. Much as I like owning a physical collection, it really doesn't matter too much. The same for books, ebooks are my lot with only the more obscure being bought in paper.

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                • #23
                  The Phillips VCR was poorly developed.When you resound it the staple would snuggle so the first few seconds of the tape would not play that and you would lose seconds off the running time.Only solution to cut the damaged tape and tape the two ends together.Those were the days.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                    The Phillips VCR was poorly developed.When you resound it the staple would snuggle so the first few seconds of the tape would not play that and you would lose seconds off the running time.Only solution to cut the damaged tape and tape the two ends together.Those were the days.
                    My first VHS video was a Phillips, and I still remember how it used to rewind at full speed all the way through to the beginning of the tape without slowing down as it got near the end. It used to make a loud clatter when it finished, and was even known to just pull the leader out of the take-up spool so the whole tape was on the other side of the cassette. All the Sony videos I've had since the Phillips always slowed down considerably when it got down to the first few minutes of the tape.

                    Another thing with the Phillips was that if there was a blank section in the tape, once the picture appeared it used to take several seconds before the sound kicked in.

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                    • #25
                      I transcribed all my video tapes to DVD many years ago,most have been replaced by 'proper' DVD's over time,but we still have some DVD R Films/TV shows which have not been released on dvd,we use a mixture of DVD and internet based watching now and keep trimming the DVD collection down as more films become available online.Of course our favourite films we do keep on DVD

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                      • #26
                        I've just upgraded my old (archaic, in fact) SkyBox to this Sky Q thing. I miss the old background muzak playing with the blue and yellow grid display, but hey-ho, I'm already getting used to the new, slick, sharp HD benefits of Q.

                        Just one problem: several less wires behind my TV now, but no scart plug on the back of the Sky Q box, so no means of recording things off my Sky planner onto my VCR. Yes, I still have and regularly use one of those. I used to have a DVD player which could record my video tapes onto disc, but unlike my far more used VCR, it conked out (I replaced it with a Blu Ray player). I might invest in a DVD machine that records, providing it will "digitise" all my old cherished VHS tapes onto discs AND successfully record from my Sky planner (the Q box appears to have a couple of those HDMI slots in the back - presumably these could connect into the back of such a DVD recorder? they certainly don't have a corresponding port in the back of the old VCR!)

                        IF I go down this route, any advice on the best type of DVD recorder to buy? And when recording onto disc, can you just keep recording separate snipperts successively onto the disc (if so, what type of disc?) until it's "full". This is why I love tape - you can physically SEE how much tape you have left and cue it up visually to record your new clip straight after the last thing you taped. My fear is inserting a disc to record and it either doesn't record at all because the disc's already got a few minutes' worth of recording on it, OR records OVER the previous recorded snippet.

                        I do realise I'm a luddite and a lot of the above will have even the most basically clued-up reader sniggering up their sleeve, but I'm not proud and have always found the BritMovie community pleasant and helpful - any advice gratefully received!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Tonch View Post

                          Just one problem: several less wires behind my TV now
                          Whatever wires were there before or after the changes, they are no less, neither are they greater. I suspect that there might be fewer of them though .

                          Steve (the pedant)

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                            Steve (the pedant)

                            Hahaa you got me there... I'd expect no LESS from you

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Tonch View Post
                              This is why I love tape - you can physically SEE how much tape you have left and cue it up visually to record your new clip straight after the last thing you taped. My fear is inserting a disc to record and it either doesn't record at all because the disc's already got a few minutes' worth of recording on it, OR records OVER the previous recorded snippet.
                              With a DVD recorder you can do both (which I have highlighted in bold) plus (Unlike tape) you can never record over a recorded programme or snippet unless you press a menu button for it to do so.

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                              • #30
                                Just one problem: several less wires behind my TV now, but no scart plug on the back of the Sky Q box, so no means of recording things off my Sky planner onto my VCR. Yes, I still have and regularly use one of those.
                                A) If you've Sky Q, then the scart would probably be redundant anyway - its not really for people still clinging on to a CRT.

                                B) I dont think you can record to an external source now (its not something that Sky probably wants you to do), and anyway, it would be in SD.

                                C) DVD recorders that allow you to burn to disk simply dont exist any more commercially - the last one probably came off the production line at least 5 years ago. And HDMI ports on such a device would be output only anyway.

                                Abandon the idea of recording from the Q box. Instead, you can digitise all your old tapes by using an analogue digital convertor, which is usually sold a bit like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/August-VGB1...o+pc+converter . Connect up the PC to the video via this, and you can then edit, clean up and burn onto DVD, etc to your hearts content. And DVD's are even easier - just use your PC to transfer them, plus a backup on a hard drive as well if you want.

                                To be honest, I've chucked all my blank DVD's - my Sony recorder hasn't worked with burning DVD's for some years, and now the EPG has failed (we are watching a lot more on catchup), but frankly, blank DVDs are so cheap that burning one programme, then using a Sharpie pen to tell you whats on it is fine. No need to reuse, even if you could be bothered.

                                If your TV has a usb slot in the back, you should be able to play stuff back from an external drive attached to it, and if its smart with wifi (and they all are now), you should be able to do that over your network from the PC. If your Tv can record to the usb, then just use that instead of faffing around with the Sky box. You've got Sky anyway, so the fact that most TV only have a single tuner, and thats the one the TV needs to use in order to record makes no odds - easy. Then just take the usb and transfer the file as you want - burn to a DVD, etc. And it costs you nothing.




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