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Which formats do you still own/Like?

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  • #46
    I still have a DVD collection, but these days I've embraced a media centre solution for streaming TV/film (it's the future after all!) and any other multimedia I have. For a while I was looking at fancy out-of-the-box things, and these days even high-end TVs have this kind of functionality. But I found a much better - and more importantly cheaper - option, the Raspberry Pi. Basically, it's a mini computer that you can use for all sorts of stuff, including as a media centre. Here's a full list of what this little guy can do, for anyone interested: https://www.1and1.co.uk/digitalguide...y-pi-projects/

    I'm not the most technically savvy person out there, so I had to enlist a little help from friends, but actually once it was set up it's actually pretty easy to use! It's connected directly to my TV, I have all my films on there, and even a remote for it, so I'm a pretty happy bunny!

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post
      I just wondered if members still collect videotapes as well as DVDs ,Blu Rays or even the good old Laser Discs?

      or do you stick with just one format and if so which one?

      Mostly DVDs, but still with the option of VHS, Beta, VCC, and LD. I have masses of VHS off-airs, and I'm steadily digitising the more rare stuff.

      We only have Blu-Ray playback on account of cheekily putting a PS3 on our wedding list in 2008, and some relatives clubbing together to get us it from that. We now have enough disc to justify getting a standalone player - and I really need to get a BD-drive for the computer - but that's not a pressing priority just yet. I tend to only buy Blu-Rays if there's a significant advantage in terms of extras and quality in relation to source material over the DVD .

      I still have a functioning Super-8 combined projector and screen viewer, but it's not been used for a few years.

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      • #48
        Nick

        Kodak Super 8 was not really much better than Standard 8 since the picture area was only fractionally bigger. Pathes 9.5 mm was by far the better amateur medium but for some reason it did not really catch on in this country as did 8mm. In fact the picture area of 9.5 mm was practically the same as 16mm since the former had the sprocket hole between the frames allowing a bigger area for the picture. The central sprocket gave trouble with some of the cheaper equipment but with a reasonable camera or projector there was no real problem, Like many things the best does not always win. Many people will tell you that the Sony Beta system was far superior to VHS and yet it just faded into obscurity whilst VHS went on to last for years.

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        • #49
          DVD, Blu-Ray, HDD, VHS, I've transferred my most rare or hard-to-find titles from VHS to DVD or HDD.
          MP4, AVI, MOV files.

          My first audio reel to reel recorder was Philips model of 1965.
          My first video recorder was the Philips 1500 Videocassette model 1974.
          Last edited by Mrs_Emma_Peel; 3rd August 2017, 09:53 PM.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by johng View Post
            Nick

            Kodak Super 8 was not really much better than Standard 8 since the picture area was only fractionally bigger.
            Sorry to disagree, but that's way off the mark. Although the two formats are the same width, the picture area of Super 8 is 50% larger than that of Standard 8.

            http://www.dvdyourmemories.com/blog/...he-difference/

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            • #51
              I would accept the point you make but bit it still gave a poor picture compared to 9.5mm.
              I suppose in those far off days Kodak ruled the waves as far as introducing the masses to photography both still and cine and it is doubtful if Pathe would have been able to break their hold.

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              • #52
                We were "in on the ground" with home VHS recording when it first became accessible, with a Ferguson VCR the size of a suitcase and with loads of "piano key" switches (no remote). Then we graduated to more modern VCRs and inevitably to a VCR/DVD thingy which enabled us to transfer all our footage. We continued keeping pace and settled on Panasonic machinery but we found that when they reached the end of their lives they corrupted discs and lost data, so we looked around for something else. Alas, the movie companies have pressurised the home appliance companies (they make movie equipment too) into phasing out these machines and it's almost impossible to buy a new one. The only one we can find is a Panasonic but crucially without inputs from other players, so copying is effectively prevented. The alternative we have found is a great Sony model, only available refurbished, but it's a terrific machine, with a huge set-record memory, fast transfer from HDD to DVD (with - RW) and good picture quality. The sound is "swallowed" a little in recording but that only affects the monitoring set (TV) not the final disc. We've had several of these now, and our primary need is to produce DVDs because we are an international family and for some reason BBC programmes are popular overseas. When the Sony is reaching the end of its life it refuses to format new discs, although it will still re-format used discs. We've found an amazing British company called Electrovid, which sells refurbished recorders and repairs existing equipment and we've had great service from them. They even did one "small" repair for us at no charge. No hesitation in recommending them, and we have no connection with them. Needs courier services for shipping. At the moment we are using a refurbished Sony, with another one standing by in reserve. These machines have enabled us to produce and amass over 1,000 discs of all kinds of movies and compilations, with editing and ad. removal, all in addition to the normal bought movies (mostly copy-protected) which number another 1,000 or so. Recent projects include the full restored Metropolis, Geneveive and Notes On A Scandal. We have all the Laurel and Hardy films a dozen times over, all the documentaries, interviews and newsreels we know about (one or two exclusive to us) and plenty more from the vintage movie era. One of our "productions" is a collection of all the British material on Laurel and Hardy, including footage of their visits, documentaries and things like the This Morning interview with Lois. As long as we can keep the Sony workhorses going, we will continue, but it's clear which way the industry is headed, to benefit the film studios, streaming services and downloads. I suppose it depends on what eventually replaces the DVD as the portable medium, and we shall have to keep pace, but until then we will do the best we can.

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                • #53
                  Some paragraphing would be useful here JF.

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                  • #54
                    I also discovered the other day that DVD recorders were no longer being made. Whilst the second hand market can solve the problem at present this will not always be the case.

                    It has been said that most people now stream to PC hard drive but surely this is not the solution.

                    Hard drives do not last forever and if one goes down then you stand to lose all your recordings unless you have backed up. Even then when you get your replacement drive you have to transfer everything back again to the new hard drive!

                    If a DVD gets corrupted then you only lose that one disc and can in many cases easily replace it.

                    In view of all the people on this forum who record and collect DVDs has anyone any comments to make on the situation and possibly suggest the way forward?

                    Probably one answer is to acquire a couple of spare 2nd hand recorders as long as they are available since in most areas there are now few engineers around who will repair electronic equipment.

                    It would be interesting to hear what other members have to say about the situation.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by johng View Post
                      I also discovered the other day that DVD recorders were no longer being made.
                      Your choices are definitely restricted nowadays. The last Blu-ray recorder I have seen was the Panasonic DMR-BWT850EB Smart 4k Ultra HD 3D Blu-ray Recorder, which I think is still listed on their website, so I'm assuming it's still available. However I've seen prices at around the £400 mark.....so it's certainly not cheap.

                      Edit: Just found it on Panasonic's website: http://www.panasonic.com/uk/consumer...-bwt850eb.html
                      Last edited by Carl V; 11th August 2017, 10:50 PM.

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                      • #56
                        I have Panasonic DVD rams for tv recording and DVD disks. I'm gradually adding Bluray to my collection. Waiting for 4k and their players to reduce in price.
                        I also record to usb disk drives. Can't back up because of the encryption though. I also stream. Have had a couple of films from Amazon but as they are digital copies I need to keep with Amazon to be able to still view them. There are screen recorder software packages that I could capture them with but its a bit of fiddling around and loss of quality.
                        ​​

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                        • #57
                          Carl V

                          Thank you for your input. Apart from the price the Panasonic is a somewhat useless piece of equipment in this context since it has no inputs. How is one supposed to connect a Sky or cable box, transfer VHS tapes to DVD, connect another DVD player or for that matter a video camera?

                          Whilst it has a Freeview tuner that is inadequate for many people. I live in area served only by a relay station which only broadcasts a limited number of channels nothing like the full number therefore one is forced to go to Sky or cable.

                          Possibly the way out is to arm oneself with a few spare DVD recorders whilst second hand or refurbished ones are still available.

                          I accept one can possibly resort to a PC but that is complicating what before was a relatively simple operation.

                          Like many other aspects this is technology gone into reverse.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by johng View Post
                            Carl V

                            Thank you for your input. Apart from the price the Panasonic is a somewhat useless piece of equipment in this context since it has no inputs. How is one supposed to connect a Sky or cable box, transfer VHS tapes to DVD, connect another DVD player or for that matter a video camera?
                            Well, I was merely addressing the first part of your post when you stated that DVD recorders were no longer made.

                            Unfortunately, they no longer use scart connections like the old days - now it's all HDMI sockets as I found out when I bought a Blu-ray player a short while back.

                            There are some forums on the internet where they discuss connecting a recorder to a Sky Q box - may be worth googling them. Likewise there are Scart to HDMI adapters, but I don't know if they'd be of any help to you with your VHS recorder.

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                            • #59
                              Carl V

                              Thank you - I value your comments. Unfortunately it seems that the problem with the Panasonic recorder is that since it has a Freeview tuner Panasonic have provided no inputs whatsoever. There is an HDMI but unfortunately it is output only. There are in fact no INPUT sockets at all otherwise it looks to be a good machine.

                              Thank you for your help..

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by johng View Post
                                Carl V

                                Thank you - I value your comments. Unfortunately it seems that the problem with the Panasonic recorder is that since it has a Freeview tuner Panasonic have provided no inputs whatsoever. There is an HDMI but unfortunately it is output only. There are in fact no INPUT sockets at all otherwise it looks to be a good machine.
                                No problem. I haven't seen the Panasonic in the flesh, so to speak, but from what you say then it does sound like a step backwards as you pointed out.

                                I still have a Sony DVD recorder with built-in hard drive and although it still records and plays back with the hard-drive, it unfortunately no longer transfer recordings onto DVD's any more. I had considered the Panasonic as a possible replacement when I first heard about it as Sony no longer make these machines, but it appears there wouldn't be any point in buying the Panasonic after all as there isn't any way to connect my satellite receiver to it.

                                A shame really as both Sony and Panasonic make some fine AV equipment, but why they don't include input sockets is quite frankly beyond me.

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