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Sony to release 'clean' versions of films as extras through download sites

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  • Sony to release 'clean' versions of films as extras through download sites

    Sony Pictures Home Entertainment has announced plans to release "clean" versions of popular films.

    It'll see "edited for content" versions available as one of the extras included with the original film purchased on download sites like iTunes.

    The project will launch with 24 films, including Easy A, the Ghostbusters franchise, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and Captain Phillips.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...download-sites

  • #2
    "Clean" in the sense that Mary Whitehouse would have used? "Clean" like "clean language", no nudity, no violence, no on-screen deaths, etc? Back to the age when gangsters were seen to mutter something that had a lip-shape suggesting it began with an "F" but came out sounding like "Gosh", or "Yikes"?
    Like watching "Towering Inferno" on a Sunday afternoon on TV and seeing that none of the characters are seen to die.
    As long as this is just an option and not a requirement then I suppose it is OK.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
      "Clean" in the sense that Mary Whitehouse would have used? "Clean" like "clean language", no nudity, no violence, no on-screen deaths, etc? Back to the age when gangsters were seen to mutter something that had a lip-shape suggesting it began with an "F" but came out sounding like "Gosh", or "Yikes"?
      Like watching "Towering Inferno" on a Sunday afternoon on TV and seeing that none of the characters are seen to die.
      As long as this is just an option and not a requirement then I suppose it is OK.
      Remember that America was started by Puritans and a lot of them still seem to have a very Puritan attitude when it comes to speaking on TV.
      Count the number of times you see someone saying "Oh Gosh" when you know that they really wanted to say "Oh, God"

      Steve


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      • #4
        Sorry if I misunderstood, but does it mean they'll continue to release films uncut on DVD/Blu-ray and only edit them for downloading?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Carl V View Post
          Sorry if I misunderstood, but does it mean they'll continue to release films uncut on DVD/Blu-ray and only edit them for downloading?
          as one of the extras included with the original film

          Original film with NO edits and an edited version of the film.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

            as one of the extras included with the original film

            Original film with NO edits and an edited version of the film.
            Thank you.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
              "Clean" in the sense that Mary Whitehouse would have used? "Clean" like "clean language", no nudity, no violence, no on-screen deaths, etc? Back to the age when gangsters were seen to mutter something that had a lip-shape suggesting it began with an "F" but came out sounding like "Gosh", or "Yikes"?
              Yes, those were the days indeed. Do you remember back in the 80's and early 90's when the Radio Times would describe a film as being a "specially prepared TV-version"......even on a film shown at midnight!

              Comment


              • #8
                "Saturday Night Fever" was one. It is actually a fairly dark story, but everyone now expects it to be nothing but John Travolta in the disco with his white suit on. There are scenes with his friends that feel more like something Scorsese would have done. Young Italian-Americans in New York out for a good time. One of them ends up taking his own life jumping off a bridge. It's dark and there is appropriate language... which in the "clean" version comes out just plain silly. If I recall correctly, they took a mild curse from a character then re-used it several times in later dialogue. So instead of something stronger (and natural), it would be "that's crazy man, he's just a *foolish person*, Don't let that *stuff* get you down. If he tries that with me I'll *fix him* good."

                Then of course, in Britain we had "The Bill" where cops and robbers called each other names that even ten-year-olds would feel were too childish. Mind you, having said that, the ten-year-olds these days swear a lot more than the adults.

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                • #9
                  Am I allowed to say "bollocks" on this forum?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                    Am I allowed to say "bollocks" on this forum?
                    You just did

                    Steve

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                    • #11
                      From the Wiki page, "Bollocks";
                      The word has a long and distinguished history, with the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) giving examples of its usage dating back to the 13th century. One of the early references is Wycliffe's Bible (1382), Leviticus xxii, 24: "Al beeste, that ... kitt and taken a wey the ballokes is, ye shulen not offre to the Lord..." (any beast that is cut and taken away the bollocks, you shall not offer to the Lord, i.e. castrated animals are not suitable as sacrifices).
                      And further down it offers this analysis of severity;
                      The relative severity of the various profanities, as perceived by the British public, was studied on behalf of the Broadcasting Standards Commission, Independent Television Commission, BBC and Advertising Standards Authority. The results of this jointly commissioned research were published in December 2000 in a paper called "Delete Expletives?".[5] This placed "bollocks" in eighth position in terms of its perceived severity, between "prick" (seventh place) and "arsehole" (ninth place).[6] By comparison, the word "balls" (which has some similar meanings) was down in 22nd place. Of the people surveyed, 25% thought that "bollocks" should not be broadcast at all, and only 11% thought that it could acceptably be broadcast at times before the national 9 pm "watershed" on television (radio does not have a watershed).[7] 25% of the people regarded "bollocks" as "very severe", 32% "quite severe", 34% "mild" and 8% considered it "not swearing".[8]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                        Yes, those were the days indeed. Do you remember back in the 80's and early 90's when the Radio Times would describe a film as being a "specially prepared TV-version"......even on a film shown at midnight!
                        I would not say " those were the days " as it still goes on even now,Last year (Christmas time ) on the BBC and Ch4 they showed films which were EDITED FOR CONTENT one film I do remember was Captain America and there were a few others











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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post
                          I would not say " those were the days " as it still goes on even now,Last year (Christmas time ) on the BBC and Ch4 they showed films which were EDITED FOR CONTENT one film I do remember was Captain America and there were a few others
                          I have to confess I mostly watch films on DVD rather than on broadcasts. Do they still edit films shown late at night too? It does seem ridiculous these days to be editing films in this manner.

                          I recall Channel 4 premiering Goodfellas back in the 90's and it was shown with all the bad language unedited. Someone complained about the amount of swearing, and despite the offensive language this particular viewer sat through, he/she went as far as to count the number of f-words they heard, which in a film with a running time of over 2 hours, came to quite a large number.

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                          • #14
                            Am I allowed to say "bollocks" on this forum?
                            No idea, but I was fascinated today to find that the word 'bollixed' was used in the book 'Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House', which was published in the US in 1946. BTW - its a delight (as of course is the film), although a little near the knuckle if you've just moved, as I have!

                            Films are still edited, depending on their broadcast time. Watching Raiders of the Lost Ark the other day, there was a bit of editing, although I noticed the bit where the truck runs over the German driver is a bit less edited than it used to be for the time slot. But after 9pm, I'd be slightly surprised if they still bothered. I know that LA Confidential was as it should be when it was shown on BBC2 the other week.

                            I recall Channel 4 premiering Goodfellas back in the 90's and it was shown with all the bad language unedited. Someone complained about the amount of swearing, and despite the offensive language this particular viewer sat through, he/she went as far as to count the number of f-words they heard, which in a film with a running time of over 2 hours, came to quite a large number
                            The swearing is a major part of the film! Joe Pesci not swearing would totally change the character. Of course you do have to wonder the mentality of someone so shocked by swearing in a film that they would sit right through it, just to count the number of swear words.

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                            • Toscana
                              Toscana commented
                              Editing a comment
                              John Wayne uses it in Chisum. He tells Billy Bonney that he "Kinda Bollixed things up"

                          • #15
                            Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                            The swearing is a major part of the film! Joe Pesci not swearing would totally change the character. Of course you do have to wonder the mentality of someone so shocked by swearing in a film that they would sit right through it, just to count the number of swear words.
                            I absolutely agree. I'm certain some people intentionally went out of their way to be offended. I'm sure magazines such as the Radio Times warned if a film contained strong language, and often the continuity announcer also gave warnings about the content of a film, yet it appears this wasn't enough for certain viewers.
                            Last edited by Carl V; 8th June 2017, 10:12 PM.

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