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(VERY FEW) New Releases

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  • (VERY FEW) New Releases

    It seems to me that throughout 2017 the number of releases of older films (not just British) has declined quite noticeably and this is reflected in the number of posts in our BD/DVD releases section. This section has been stuck on its last item since 2 November and the item before that is from early September. Am I right or are our usual spies who search the web not searching with their usual determination? Or are the companies no longer so interested in the older stuff.

  • #2
    I think it is because the companies aren’t really Interest

    Comment


    • #3
      Lots of re-releases onto Blu-ray

      Comment


      • #4
        There was an article last year which expressed surprise/horror at the relatively small number of films on Netflix from before 1970, and there was a thread a little while back about some films being shown on TV that were evidently only still available in SD form.

        On the other hand, more releases are coming out in Blu Ray every day, and 4K is starting to ramp up as well, both on disc and streaming.

        I think that there are several different issues. Firstly, if you think about it, just releasing films post 1980 (so pretty much the start of the home video age) means 37 years of films. Thats pretty much the same timespan as from when sound films kicked in until the release of The Graduate. So if you were a studio looking to release in HD/4K, then you'd probably start with the newest first, or with material already in a suitable format. And a Blu Ray rerelease may be more commercially sensible.

        Bringing material up to snuff for a 4K release (and with 4K becoming the de facto modern TV resolution, that should be the initial step even for Blu Ray releases these days) costs money. For older material, that also means sourcing the best prints, correcting damage and flaws, etc. Its an investment, and that has be set against the market value of a product. So while a classic iconic 1060's movie might get the full treatment, a British quota quickie is much further down the list. That might be fine on SD, at least for the moment, simply because its not worth the extra cash. And then you have to add the nightmare of who owns the rights, etc.

        On the other hand, there is certainly a market for silents on Blu Ray, and more classics are coming out every day, but its the bits in the middle that might get lost. There was a lot of complaints that a fair number of films got lost in the transition from video to dvd - pretty much everything got dumped onto video, because the market was huge and hungry, but dvd got more selective. There are certainly some films I have that have been released on VHS, but not on DVD (although at least one of them has been shown on TV a number of times, so a broadcast version exists).

        I think the same might be said of blu ray/4K - its the cost of nailing down the rights, getting the transfer, etc. And then judging if the market wants it, and sadly, if you think that 'the kids' wont watch anything in black and white, or something thats not an automatic classic, then they go to the back of the line as far Netflix, etc is concerned. On the other hand, Talking Pictures seems to be doing OK (although it cut costs by reducing the number of transmitters it was on) and Network are still releasing stuff (although God knows how many people buy some of their releases), so perhaps there is a market. And if there is a market, then someone will want to supply it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Everything written above is correct.However given that we seniors constitute a large market we ought to be catered to.Furthermore I refuse to invest in Blue Ray particularly since the discs are quite expensive.
          Definately missing Lovefilm

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          • #6
            Everything written above is correct.However given that we seniors constitute a large market we ought to be catered to.Furthermore I refuse to invest in Blue Ray particularly since the discs are quite expensive.
            Definately missing Lovefilm
            You might be a large market, but money talks. Say that you want Netflix to have older films or you'll go elsewhere, and perhaps they and the studios will listen. Certainly fans of silents seem to be pretty well catered for - I suspect that its the marginal films that wont get the full release at the moment. The market is the market.

            If you dont have a Blu Ray player or discs, your really missing out. Its a much better picture than DVD, has more extras, and is often pretty cheap. At random, I looked at how much the Liz Taylor Cleopatra was on Amazon, and compared it with the DVD. There are various Blu Ray versions, but £6.38 is a current version. The DVD? Again, various versions, but the current one seems to be £6.38......

            And you can buy 2nd hand. Amazon has new and used, and CEX is basically Exchange & Mart reborn - and Cleopatra is just £4 there.

            A Blu Ray player of course plays DVD's, and upscales them (as I explained to a nice lady today, when I sold her a Panasonic BT180 player), which makes your DVD's look better as well - I'm watching Buffy at the moment on DVD, and it looks very decent indeed. And of course they are smart, so Iplayer, etc are all built in.

            You dont have to replace your complete DVD collection, but if a film has been released on DVD and Blu Ray, then its certainly worth buying it on Blu ray, especially if you can get someone else to take the initial hit and then buy it cheaper second hand. Yes, there is a differential, but not always as much you you might think.

            And sending DVD's through the post is still possible, but Amazon wont offer that service, but instead Amazon Prime Video is your for £7.99 a month, and you'll have a lot more content available instantly.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
              If you dont have a Blu Ray player or discs, your really missing out. Its a much better picture than DVD, has more extras, and is often pretty cheap.
              An interesting idea, but where’s the proof?

              I don’t deny that there are more pixels available per frame with Blu-Ray but it’s impossible to show more pixels than is possible to see on the TV screen

              so, if we get a Blu-Ray player, do you expect us to buy a massive TV which can show a picture in that much detail? Even if your hi-definition TV can show them, can it show them in enough detail to be visible by a normal viewer

              Don’t just accept the advertising at face value!

              Steve

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              • #8
                Firstly can I make the point that after Amazon closed down LOVEFiLM they can go and stick Amazon Prime where the sun don't shine.
                Furthermore I like old battered prints,particularly when it gets to the end of a reel.I don't want Blu Ray.No doubt the electronics industry will come up with some new device to make suckers,sorry customers,to stump up the readies.Thanks but no thanks

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                • #9
                  An interesting idea, but where’s the proof?

                  I don’t deny that there are more pixels available per frame with Blu-Ray but it’s impossible to show more pixels than is possible to see on the TV screen
                  And again....

                  Its simple. A Blu Ray has far more information on it that a DVD, which in turn has more information on it than a VHS tape. Watch all three next to each other projected onto a screen (so nothing to do with the screen resolution of a TV) - the cinema screen you'd be watching at your multiplex is 4K, Blu Ray would look a bit rough, and if it was VHS you'd be demanding your money back.

                  You dont even have to set foot outside your front doot to see the difference between SD (so DVD) and HD (actually 1080p these days, but TV is at 1080i, so close enough) - just look at something like Blue Planet II on Sunday night on BBC1, and then flick over to BBC1 HD - the difference is clear.

                  Yes - its impossible to show more than the panels resolution, but since they stopped selling SD TV's in the UK over a decade ago, something like 80% or more of homes have an HD Ready or Full HD set (so they aleady have a TV thats capable of showing that level of detail - in fact thats what Full HD really means), and if its got an HDMI on the back, they can have HD. Even if they've just got an HD-Ready set, thats got about 1m pixels on it (Full HD is 2m). SD resolution is roughly 300k - so even if they put BBC 2 HD on, it would still be a lot better than a DVD.

                  I can see that my recently purchased Blu Ray copy of The Spy Who Loved Me looks better than the DVD version on the handmedown LG 32in TV that I've got. Frankly, I can show that HD looks a lot better on a 24in TV, something I still occasionally have to do at work with customers who have got strange notions in their heads. Its not advertising, just observable reality.

                  And Blu Ray isn't some fad - its been around for a decade, as has HD TV. People dont have to buy it, but given the choice between a better or worse picture for about the same money, then I will go for the better picture. And while some people might mourn the loss of Lovefilm, (and there are alternatives), technology means that its business model was looking to go the way of finding the number of your local Blockbuster in your Yellow Pages. And I remember the downsides of Lovefilm as well. Someone gave us a 6 month subscription when our first child was born, which was very handy. However, popular films were often not available (there were only so many copies), there was a bit of a gap between ordering, getting, watching, returning and getting another disc. And when you got the disc, it might be badly scratched. And sometimes you found out that you hated the film you'd ordered. I remember watching a highly rated film with Clive Owen, and after 20min, my wife and I both decided we hated it and couldn't be bothered to watch any more. But the earliest we could get another disc was about 3 days.....

                  On the net its instant, there is no queuing for a popular title, if you get 20min in and you hate it, you just find something else, and you can watch a box set over the course of a day or two, not weeks, if you want. For most people, its just a lot easier. And if people dont want that service, you cannot afford to offer it.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Firstly I quote from a blog on nitrateville
                    I have a few Blu ray discs that won't play in a Blu ray player.The format was rushed to market to compete with HD DVD and it never really got its requirements down.
                    Buff said.
                    Up till the 1980s I was happily hiring films on 16mm when along came video,wiping out the libraries within a couple of years.
                    First we had VCRs,then Betamax,then VHS then DVD and now Blu Ray.I bet that within 5 years Blu Ray will be as extinct as Betamax because the manufacturers want to sell you a new gadget,as its the latest thing,well I don't fall for that.
                    Finally,as to LOVEFiLM,I knew what I wanted,and had a want list of over 100 titles.I cannot,in5years,recall receiving a film I didn't want,or one that I didn't watch right through.
                    I don't want to watch a film on my computer or tablet and I do not have the ability to link my computer to my 26 year old TV.Notflix for me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post

                      And again....

                      Its simple. A Blu Ray has far more information on it that a DVD, which in turn has more information on it than a VHS tape.
                      That was never in any doubt (by me at least). What I was asking though is, can you SEE the difference on a TV.

                      I have copies of The Red Shoes (the latest, fully restored version) on DVD and on a Blu-Ray. But when I play them both onto my 48” 1080i TV, I can’t tell the difference between them, neither can anyone else who I’ve shown them to

                      Marketing is a wonderful thing
                      It makes everyone buy another copy of things that they’ve already got

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have copies of The Red Shoes (the latest, fully restored version) on DVD and on a Blu-Ray. But when I play them both onto my 48” 1080i TV, I can’t tell the difference between them, neither can anyone else who I’ve shown them to
                        If you cant see the difference, you cant see the difference. Its up to the individual to judge. But we increasingly live in an HD world (if not a 4K quite yet), and at some point, SD will go.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post

                          If you cant see the difference, you cant see the difference. Its up to the individual to judge.
                          My point was that nobody else could tell the difference either. So what's the point of Blu-Ray unless you have a TV the size of your wall?

                          Steve

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post
                            Marketing is a wonderful thing
                            It makes everyone buy another copy of things that they’ve already got
                            As a relative newcomer to blu-ray, with the exception of the Alien box-set, I haven't replaced any DVD's with blu-rays - simply because it would cost me a fortune and I'm perfectly happy with the DVD anyway. Any new titles I purchase however will be on blu-ray.

                            I have to say as well in comparison, I can compare the Alien films in both formats and on my 43" screen, the blu-rays look stunning. The DVD set is great, no question of that, and I've spent many happy hours watching them since I bought them about the time when DVD's came out. The blu-ray on the other hand has more detail and I don't doubt the difference would probably be more noticeable on a much larger screen to the one I have.

                            Beware though, there have been some blu-ray releases of older films released with a very poor transfer and in some cases I've read reviews stating that the DVD version was actually better. However, with a brand new recently released film, the blu-ray should without question be an improvement on the DVD.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                              As a relative newcomer to blu-ray, with the exception of the Alien box-set, I haven't replaced any DVD's with blu-rays - simply because it would cost me a fortune and I'm perfectly happy with the DVD anyway. Any new titles I purchase however will be on blu-ray.

                              I have to say as well in comparison, I can compare the Alien films in both formats and on my 43" screen, the blu-rays look stunning. The DVD set is great, no question of that, and I've spent many happy hours watching them since I bought them about the time when DVD's came out. The blu-ray on the other hand has more detail and I don't doubt the difference would probably be more noticeable on a much larger screen to the one I have.

                              Beware though, there have been some blu-ray releases of older films released with a very poor transfer and in some cases I've read reviews stating that the DVD version was actually better. However, with a brand new recently released film, the blu-ray should without question be an improvement on the DVD.
                              I have been a great sceptic about home video systems over the years. When watching VHS tapes on a 21" 4x3 TV, I couldn't see the point of DVDs. Then widescreen TVs came along and VHS didn't look so good and virtually all DVDs had 'Scope films in the correct ratio and I was converted. When my sister got an HDTV, I wasn't greatly impressed, eventually I acquired a 32" HD ready TV myself, but without an HD tuner, I was still watching in SD. I then acquired a new Blu-ray/DVD player with twin HD tuners and saw HD on my set for the first time. I was amazed by the sharpness of the picture and have come to the conclusion that my sister's set was never properly adjusted. I bought a few Blu-rays, carefully selecting ones which had good reviews (and were available relatively cheaply, which happily included many of the 50's/60's 70mm epics). I was completely converted to the HD experience and within a week went out and bought a 47" TV for an even better viewing experience. I now have a couple of hundred Blu-rays, but there is no way that I would ever think of converting my entire DVD collection (even if the film were available). I have a few 4x3 black and white films on Blu and frankly have been disappointed with them, so I generally wouldn't bother with older 4x3 stuff. However, large format movies (70mm, VistaVision, Technirama), if properly mastered look absolutely stunning on Blu-ray. However, you do have to be careful, many blu-rays are no better than a DVD due to inferior transfers and some actually are worse (my DVD of Where Eagles Dare is much sharper and brighter than the unrestored Blu-ray). Of course, another "advantage" of Blu-rays is that they run at the correct speed of 24 fps, rather than the 4% PAL speed up of region 2 DVDs.

                              Comment

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