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Dunkirk (1958) Blu Ray

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  • Dunkirk (1958) Blu Ray

    A timely revival of this film which was never well-served on DVD. Unlike many 1950s British war films, the heroics here are understated and derive almost entirely from the civilians in the small boats. This always looked like a big-budget epic of sorts but it inevitably had a downbeat feel (a defeat, after all). It will be interesting to compare with the upcoming new film production of Dunkirk.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dunkirk-Dig...unkirk+blu+ray


  • #2
    Originally posted by Captain Oates View Post
    A timely revival of this film which was never well-served on DVD. Unlike many 1950s British war films, the heroics here are understated and derive almost entirely from the civilians in the small boats. This always looked like a big-budget epic of sorts but it inevitably had a downbeat feel (a defeat, after all). It will be interesting to compare with the upcoming new film production of Dunkirk.


    Is there a difference between the DVD and the Blu Ray then?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

      Is there a difference between the DVD and the Blu Ray then?
      Quality. 4.5 times as many pixels.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

        Is there a difference between the DVD and the Blu Ray then?
        As well as the superior quality, many of the earlier DVDs were in 4.3 ratio rather than widescreen.

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        • #5
          But if they were made before 1953 that was the ratio they were filmed in.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by orpheum View Post
            But if they were made before 1953 that was the ratio they were filmed in.
            This was filmed between 1957 and 1958 and released in 1958 and the Aspect Ratio:is 1.78 : 1

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            • #7
              I am not prepared to buy blue Ray discs and equipment for watching my mainly black and white collection.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                I am not prepared to buy blue Ray discs and equipment for watching my mainly black and white collection.
                That's fair enough especially if you already own the DVD. I'm generally resisting the temptation of replacing DVD's with a Blu-ray disc, unless the latter has something exceptionally different to the DVD (apart from the HD quality).

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                • #9
                  I also resist the temptation to buy BD's if I already have the DVD, but there are some films that make me reach for my wallet. The BD transfer of 2001: A space odyssey is immaculate, for instance. An added factor is the 'extras' that often come with the BD release.

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                  • #10
                    Looks like the BBC is also re-releasing its own (2004) docu-drama to join Christopher Nolan's new film and the 1958 blu ray on the retailer's shelves.



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                    Note the US DVD of the BBC production pictures AMERICAN troops on the beach! Think they might have confused this with D-DAY!

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                    Also a more dodgy production called Operation Dunkirk features an even more blatant Americanisation of the theme - 'true events' indeed:

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                    • #11
                      I shudder whenever a remake is mentioned and Dunkirk is no exception having read my colleagues on here regarding the more recent reviews. It appears Saving Private Ryan was an opportunity for opportunistic filmmakers to turn the war into a fertile semi-truth allotment from whereby regular hit movies can be made.

                      I'm readily settling for the 1958 version anytime. Pathos, good acting, sincerity in each frame. Of course directed by Monty Norman, the father of OUR Barry Norman who died just a few days ago. The dead and the survivors of the actual Dunkirk campaign need better tributes than the Technicolor tripe on offer recently.

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                      • #12
                        It was Leslie,not Monty,Norman.
                        it's a great film I doubt that the new one will match it.

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                        • #13
                          A bit of trivia: the largest regiment in the British army in WWII was the Royal Artillery, which had a larger manpower than all the infantry regiments combined.

                          As far as I can recall, the Royal Artillery is depicted (briefly) in only two WWII films: Dunkirk (1958) and A Bridge Too Far (1977). An RA battery is also the post-war setting for The Bofors Gun (1968).

                          I'd be interested in hearing of anymore...

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                          • #14
                            I shudder whenever a remake is mentioned and Dunkirk is no exception having read my colleagues on here regarding the more recent reviews. It appears Saving Private Ryan was an opportunity for opportunistic filmmakers to turn the war into a fertile semi-truth allotment from whereby regular hit movies can be made.
                            The new film isn't a remake - Dunkirk is an historical event, and you can make a film about it any time you like. Its not like there havn't been enough books and novels written about it as source material. Whether its any good is another matter, and we will have to wait and see, but Christoper Nolan is an excellent director with a strong track record. To be honest, the 1958 film isn't exactly true to life either - Mill's Sgt is a fictional character, as is the journalist, etc. Thats fine, but assuming its fact is off the mark, and of course its a film of its time.

                            A bit of trivia: the largest regiment in the British army in WWII was the Royal Artillery, which had a larger manpower than all the infantry regiments combined.

                            As far as I can recall, the Royal Artillery is depicted (briefly) in only two WWII films: Dunkirk (1958) and A Bridge Too Far (1977). An RA battery is also the post-war setting for The Bofors Gun (1968).

                            I'd be interested in hearing of anymore...
                            I can't think of any more, but then again, firing shells against people relatively far away isn't exactly box office, and you dont see many films about the REME or RASC either. Actually, you do get to see 25pdrs going off in The Dirty Dozen....

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                            • #15
                              I think that you will find some of the army film units documentaries of WW 2 feature a lot of artillery.

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