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Journeys End 2018

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  • Journeys End 2018

    Just saw the trailer for this.Seems interesting.Only a few of us will have seen the 1930 version.

  • #2
    I've got a ticket for the showing in Stamford. And, no, I've not seen the 1930 version.

    Nick

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    • #3
      It is a real period piece and filmed only11 years after the end of the war.Directed by James Whale.acting is of its time but in its way the film is a piece of history.

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      • #4
        My Dad was in the play on stage at the Bristol Old Vic with Paul Eddington back in the 1970s. It's an enthralling bit of stagecraft and the drama is very claustrophobic, being played out in the confines of a dug-out in the WW1 trenches. The adaptation of storyline into the film "Aces High" took away all the claustrophobia and replaced it with vast expanses of sky... I would like to watch that again.
        http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075627/?ref_=nv_sr_1

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        • #5
          I saw it today.It has been opened out and thus looses the claustrophobia of the original.Lots of camera movement which I found extremely irritating.It has now been placed at the start of the German attack in March 1918.

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          • #6
            It has been opened out and thus looses the claustrophobia of the original
            To be fair, you couldn't really make a film of a stage play like Journeys End, and not open it out. Some blokes in a dugout isn't really going to do it over 90min on a cinema screen, and thats fairly general of films based on plays. In fact, they have often been criticized for being too stagey and enclosed.

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            • #7
              Too be fair,the film looses the essential air of claustrophobia and just becomes another war film.

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              • #8
                "To be fair"
                "The film loses the essential air"
                You're welcome.

                They seek him here, they seek him there, that totally annoying Orthography Avenger, just turns up to derail threads and interrupt conversations everywhere.

                I can't ignore an opportunity to help someone to improve themselves. Without correction, standards will slip and English will belong to the Americans.

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                • #9
                  At the end of the film there is a totally superfluous scene of a sister receiving a letter from her now deceased brother.

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                  • #10
                    Is it anything like the letter that Captain Darling addressed to his Dear Doris, before going over the top in the last episode of "Blackadder Goes Forth". Incidentally, Blackadder Goes Forth must be the closest thing to a TV adaptation of Journey's End.

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                    • #11
                      Ahh, the mind doth play tricks. The line I was thinking of, from Blackadder goes forth, is actually an entry in Captain Darling's journal. It comes at the beginning of this clip, which is from the final episode.
                       

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                        It is a real period piece and filmed only11 years after the end of the war.Directed by James Whale.acting is of its time but in its way the film is a piece of history.

                        Whale, of course, saw combat in the Great War and ended up a POW. I dug out his post-War debriefing at the National Archives, and he describes his capture in a rather dramatic but self-depracting manner.
                        Last edited by Nick Cooper; 9th February 2018, 04:51 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
                          Blackadder Goes Forth must be the closest thing to a TV adaptation of Journey's End.

                          Apart from the BBC versions in 1937, 1960, and 1988, you mean?

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                          • StoneAgeMan
                            StoneAgeMan commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Aahhh. Yes, that was a silly comment wasn't it! Perhaps I could have said a lot of the atmosphere and context of "Blackadder Goes Forth" appears to follow closely the key elements of "Journey's End" and may have reached more people in terms of viewing numbers.

                        • #14
                          I think you have hit the nail on the head.The 1930 film was made by men who had actually served in the trenches.So despite all the sophistication of modern filmmakers they can never replicate the atmosphere generated in the 1930film.
                          By the way the letter I mentioned is from the schoolboy friend of Stanhope saying how delightedbheis to be with him.
                          Stanhope is driven to drink because he realises he is sending the boy to certain death.

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                          • #15
                            Originally posted by orpheum View Post
                            I think you have hit the nail on the head.The 1930 film was made by men who had actually served in the trenches.So despite all the sophistication of modern filmmakers they can never replicate the atmosphere generated in the 1930film.
                            By the way the letter I mentioned is from the schoolboy friend of Stanhope saying how delightedbheis to be with him.
                            Stanhope is driven to drink because he realises he is sending the boy to certain death.

                            Sadly, Colin Clive had started to rely on drinking to steady his nerves for the original London stage production of Journey's End. He was also very much personally tortured by the fact that he himself not been able to serve, when many of his peers had, with some of them being amongst the War's casualties.

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