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Showing DUNKIRK in 2.20 ratio in UK cinemas

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  • #16
    Can I just add that my tablet seemed determined to use the word hairstyles instead of airbattles.so please no comments about that.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by orpheum View Post
      Now I don't want to get in a debate but....
      No worries, thanks for replying. I feel your pain on the tablets, btw!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by orpheum View Post
        the hairstyles
        I noticed this just from seeing the trailer! It seems to have become somewhat of a trend in recent years to feature blatently modern hairstyles in period productions. Another good example is Peaky Blinders. Nevertheless, I'm really looking forward to seeing Dunkirk - I'll just have to try to forget the fact that Harry Styles is in it, for some inexplicable reason!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by orpheum View Post
          Air:the [air battles] took place over land not over sea.
          On the contrary, the Secret History documentary on C4 a few weeks back showed that there were many RAF losses out to sea, as that was where they were engaging the Luftwaffe aircraft attacking the large vessels. Granted, there were more losses further in land, but to claim that there were no engagements over the sea is inaccurate. In comparison there was not much RAF activity over the beaches, but there was some.

          Army.It was the British army who mainly fought the rearguard action to stop the Germans not the French.
          That's misleading. British troops manned most of the outer perimeter, but not all of it, and they then had to fall back through the French units who stayed in place. The British rearguard amounted to 4,000 men, who left on the night of 2-3 June, while the remaining 40,000 French held the line - they surrendered on 4 June.

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          • #20
            Can I suggest that you use less argumentative language.You state that what I am saying is misleading then admit that what I am saying is correct..

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            • #21
              It seems to have become somewhat of a trend in recent years to feature blatently modern hairstyles in period productions. Another good example is Peaky Blinders.
              The haircuts in Peaky Blinders are not 'modern', they as authentic as the props, clothing,etc. Its called an 'undercut' https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undercut_(hairstyle) and was popular with street gangs of the period. TV and films usually do their best to make productions as authentic as possible, and haircuts are an obvious one - so thats what they did. The fact that it looks modern is accidental.

              We think that street gangs, with particular clothes, haircuts etc are a more recent thing, but The Scuttlers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scuttlers (I read a review of Gary Jame's book some years ago) had special belts, which were both status symbols and weapons, plus particular haircuts and trousers. Even their girlfriends would have a particular 'uniform'. And they were as heavily armed and as willing for a fight as a modern youth gang. The same went for the Peaky Blinder youth gang, etc.

              As for the Dunkirk fighter cover, Luftwaffe activity was concentrated on knocking out shipping in the final couple of days (according to The Narrow Margin, which I happen to have to hand), having bombed the town and port (which set fire to the oil tanks) on May 31st, and so RAF fighters were more likely to operating over the sea, and increasingly at higher altitude (although they tended to operate at medium and low altitude at first), away from the beaches, hence the complaints from those on it of not seeing RAF cover. And yes, there were far more French troops ultimately blocking the Germans from the town http://www.warfaremagazine.co.uk/art...nkirk-1940/216 (and the French divisions at Lille held up the Germans and thus bought invaluable time) than British ones - and all the rear guard troops were very brave, because they knew that they were either going to be killed or captured.

              BTW, among the criticisms of the film that I've seen, one is that there are seemingly too few soldiers on the beach. But whilst looking up something in The Narrow Margin, I noticed a photo of the evacuation beach at Bray. What you notice are some concentration of troops at the waters edge, and a long line of soldiers snaking down to the water, but actually much of the beach is empty. In other photos of course, you notice the beaches are packed, or lots of long concentrated lines, but there does seem to have been some variation.


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              • #22
                The Projectionist’s Letter, quoted by the OP, says the--

                Feature Run Time: 01:46:28
                Credit Start Time: 01:39:09
                Crawl Start Time: 01:40:54 .


                I know that the end credits seemed to last nine minutes long but I wonder what they mean by "Crawl time"?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jamal.nazreddin View Post
                  The Projectionist’s Letter, quoted by the OP, says the--

                  Feature Run Time: 01:46:28
                  Credit Start Time: 01:39:09
                  Crawl Start Time: 01:40:54 .


                  I know that the end credits seemed to last nine minutes long but I wonder what they mean by "Crawl time"?
                  When the credits start, the key credits usually appear as static images often with scenes from the film (static or moving) continuing in the background. At some point the screen usually goes black and the credits start scrolling up the screen from bottom to top. This point is known as the 'Crawl Start Time'..

                  For Health and Safety reasons most cinemas now put the lights on during the end credits, some to half brightness (as in the adverts) or some to full. Whether you agree with that or not is debatable.
                  In my opinion a good cinema should leave the lights switched off if pictures are continuing in the background and not put them on until 'Crawl Start Time'. Some cinemas do this, some don't.

                  Of course, for some films the 'Credit Start Time' and the 'Crawl Start Time' are the same or just a few seconds apart.
                  Last edited by PhilipW; 6th August 2017, 01:46 PM.

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                  • #24
                    ^Ah thank you. So that's saying the credits last seven minutes while we decide whether we going to sit in our seat or start CRAWLING out of the cinema.

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                    • #25
                      We are the sort of people who look at the closing credits to see who the key grip is, etc. For most people, they are grabbing their coat, dashing to the loo, and trying to get to the carpark before everyone tries to get out at once and there is a traffic jam.

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                      • #26
                        I am one of those who always sits to the end, much to the annoyance of the staff who are itching to get in to sweep up the spilled popcorn.

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                        • #27
                          I sat through the credits to see that Dunkirk had scenes filmed at Dunkirk, England, the Netherlands ..... and Burbank Studios, USA.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                            I am one of those who always sits to the end, much to the annoyance of the staff who are itching to get in to sweep up the spilled popcorn.
                            I used to be like that, these days, with the internet providing all that information and more, I join the scrum- unless there was some contribution that particularly caught my eye.

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                            • #29
                              That was apparently post production, plus possibly some scenes like inside cockpits, etc. They actually used a Californian lighthouse as well.

                              Films are often shot in places you wouldn't expect. Glasgow stood in for LA in World War Z, I remember going past the Guildhall in the City of London with NY taxicabs outside, evidently doubling as somewhere in New York, of course the House of Commons interiors are regularly actually shot in Manchester Town Hall. Thats nothing new - the Fu Man Chu films were shot in Dublin, as was a lot of The First Great Train Robbery, the Three/Four Musketeers was shot in Franco's Spain plus the UK, and most of Braveheart was shot in Ireland. Its the magic of cinema.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                                ... Its the magic of cinema...
                                Yes indeed. I remember how suspicious I was when Olivier filmed the battle of Bosworth Field in Spain. And The Blue Max had to be filmed in Ireland because English skies were too polluted.

                                My surprise was that I heard some publicity that Nolan wanted to make a completely English film on location with complete verisimilitude.

                                And I get so dismayed that the current generation of films are more about animation than human beings.

                                The occasional human being might used to wear one of those 'Ping-Pong suits' in front of a Green Screen and then a thousand faceless workers come in to manipulate millions of pixels to make a pretence at reality. For instance, I think that the last Mad Max film had a 3 minute sequence manipulated by a 'secret' company in Korea and another 3 minute sequence manipulated by a 'secret' company in USA and another 3 minute sequence manipulated by a 'secret' company in Hungary and another 3 minute sequence manipulated by a 'secret' company in etc, etc. etc.

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