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Showing DUNKIRK in 2.20 ratio in UK cinemas

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Nick Cooper View Post
    With a fraction of the budget, the BBC series achieved far more.
    The BBC series was indeed excellent, but its goals and objectives were totally different from what Nolan was aiming for in this film.

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    • #47
      In our region we have cinemas to avoid and couple of excellent units and we enjoyed a good presentation of Dunkirk with images acquired using film stock which I favour. A bit choking watching the lift and loss of life bringing back stories a lost friend used to tell me wide eyed of them awaiting a boat and his own experience first hand.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Nick Cooper View Post

        I think Nolan eschewing CGI is part of the problem. Despite having a thousand extras available, the beach still looks virtually deserted of both men and vehicles.
        A friend really nailed it yesterday, when he said it was a small scale story shot in a large scale way. With a fraction of the budget, the BBC series achieved far more.
        After taking in what was said in earlier posts I have read up on Dunkirk and was totally wrong in my misconception of what I thought to be true. However, I still think there was more CGI than Nolan let's on as he only quotes hw seemless it was from what I have read. I also think above quote is correct and perhaps it needed more CGI rather than less. Whatever way it's painted it was not a good film and for me it stops there.

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        • #49
          I posted this in the watched last night section recently - my take on 'Dunkirk'

          Hmmm yes we watched this film and had doubts about it from almost the first scene,almost all the soldiers seemed to be male model types LOL,Harry Styles appears right from the getgo with neatly coiffured hair and freshly clean shaven (as you would expect of a soldier who has been retreating for weeks ),then he crosses a French barricade receiving german fire - within a couple of yards of the beach (unlikely at that stage of the game).Agree about the timelines being absolutely absurd,some of the flying scenes were done quite well,although the end scene with the stopped engine was absolutely ridiculous - first shooting down a Stuka and then gliding for miles into enemy hands when he merely had to belly land near the brits (nobody in their right mind would put landing gear down to do a beach landing).None of the actors showed any character or personality and there was no feeling of involvment with the actors at all - as with many modern films - no 'atmosphere' - also with the usual movie schoolboy mistake of having most people dressed as if they have just picked up their clothing straight from the Tailor .
          The film even seemed to end on a huge historical inaccuracy,they seemed to somehow end up in Dorset from their little boat,afaik all boats went from Dover/Ramsgate for a short crossing (39 miles - shortest of the 3 evacuation routes) - Dunkirk to Weymouth as the crow flies is 212 miles with all its attendant dangers.

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          • #50
            To be fair to Weymouth (as someone from Poole, its not easy to write that), the film was shot in part in Weymouth. Its not meant to be Weymouth in the film.

            As for the gliding Spitfire, the incident is possibly based on the 19 Squadron Spitfire, which was recovered some years ago (people had been talking about for years - Flypast had several articles). Actually, Spitfire's can glide pretty well, especially if you feather the prop, with a total glide of 15 miles in one case. Pre war RAF pilots were expected to land in training with the engine essentially unpowered (dangerous, not standard in other air forces and it caused a surprising number of accidents), so an unpowered landing wouldn't have been unfamiliar to a regular flying a Spitfire at this point. Apparently the way it gets thrown around before the landing makes no sense, but this a movie.

            I havn't seen the part where the plane lands (we keep playing about 3 scenes at work, continually), but having to make a landing on a beach isn't unique. There is a picture of a Spitfire with a broken back that crashed at Dunkirk, and the angle of the nose suggests that it might have landed on its wheels first, before being burnt out. And belly landings had their own dangers - Al Deere's Spitfire dug its nose into the sand when he crash landed it at Dunkirk, and knocked him out. And I seem to remember that Eisenhower's personal aircraft ferrying him to Normandy after D-Day had to make a forced landing on a beach, where everyone aboard had to pull it out of the way of the tide.

            I must admit that the bits I've seen of the soldiers on the Mole do make them all a bit clean and shaved....

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Soap Talk View Post

              Whatever way it's painted it was not a good film and for me it stops there.
              Your opinion is, of course, as valid as anyone else's. However the majority of the reviews, and the Rotten Tomatoes score of 92% in conjunction with the IMDB score of 8.1/10, would tend to suggest a minority opinion.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                To be fair to Weymouth (as someone from Poole, its not easy to write that), the film was shot in part in Weymouth. Its not meant to be Weymouth in the film.

                As for the gliding Spitfire, the incident is possibly based on the 19 Squadron Spitfire, which was recovered some years ago (people had been talking about for years - Flypast had several articles). Actually, Spitfire's can glide pretty well, especially if you feather the prop, with a total glide of 15 miles in one case. Pre war RAF pilots were expected to land in training with the engine essentially unpowered (dangerous, not standard in other air forces and it caused a surprising number of accidents), so an unpowered landing wouldn't have been unfamiliar to a regular flying a Spitfire at this point. Apparently the way it gets thrown around before the landing makes no sense, but this a movie.

                I havn't seen the part where the plane lands (we keep playing about 3 scenes at work, continually), but having to make a landing on a beach isn't unique. There is a picture of a Spitfire with a broken back that crashed at Dunkirk, and the angle of the nose suggests that it might have landed on its wheels first, before being burnt out. And belly landings had their own dangers - Al Deere's Spitfire dug its nose into the sand when he crash landed it at Dunkirk, and knocked him out. And I seem to remember that Eisenhower's personal aircraft ferrying him to Normandy after D-Day had to make a forced landing on a beach, where everyone aboard had to pull it out of the way of the tide.

                I must admit that the bits I've seen of the soldiers on the Mole do make them all a bit clean and shaved....
                I wrote about Dorset because that is what our Hero says at the end of the film - ''we disembarked in Dorset'' (cannot remember exact words) rather than (say) Ramsgate or Dover.
                My points about the Spitfire beach landing were that (1) It could have been belly landed near our troops rather than into enemy hands and (2) No pilot would put landing gear down for a beach landing because there is a real danger of turning over,a spitfire would tip up on its nose even with medium braking.I agree that a belly landing has its own dangers but one is much more likely to turn turtle with wheels down on soft/unknown ground.It was normal practice to land wheels 'up' when carrying out a forced landing
                A Spitfire prop could not be feathered at that time (june 1940).It would either be in coarse or fine pitch assuming it had an adjustable pitch prop (which most spits on ops did by that stage) - at that time the Spitfire would have had a 2 position manually controlled prop pitch,if the engine failed the pilot would perhaps hope that the prop was in coarse pitch which would be less 'draggy' than fine pitch.

                Proper fully automatic 'constant speed' propellers were not fitted to spitfires until july/august 1940.
                Last edited by Nick Dando; 11th January 2018, 04:42 PM.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by narabdela View Post

                  The BBC series was indeed excellent, but its goals and objectives were totally different from what Nolan was aiming for in this film.
                  Yes, I get that, but in some quarter's Nolan's film is being bracketed as the "definitive" Dunkirk film in the same way Saving Private Ryan is for D-Day, despite the fact that both do not even remotely capture the full magnitude of events.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Soap Talk View Post
                    After taking in what was said in earlier posts I have read up on Dunkirk and was totally wrong in my misconception of what I thought to be true. However, I still think there was more CGI than Nolan let's on as he only quotes hw seemless it was from what I have read.
                    There was certainly a lot of green screen artifacting in evidence, particularly the close shots of the Spitfires in flight.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Nick Cooper View Post

                      Yes, I get that, but in some quarter's(sic) Nolan's film is being bracketed as the "definitive" Dunkirk film in the same way Saving Private Ryan is for D-Day...

                      Uninformed quarters by the sound of it. Both films are intended to offer a snapshot of events. Neither Nolan nor Spielberg had any intention of offering a definitive version.

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                      • #56
                        A Spitfire prop could not be feathered at that time (june 1940).It would either be in course or fine pitch assuming it had an adjustable pitch prop (which most spits on ops did by that stage) - at that time the Spitfire would have had a 2 position manually controlled prop pitch,if the engine failed the pilot would perhaps hope that the prop was in course pitch which would be less 'draggy' than fine pitch.
                        True - course pitch was the best that you could hope for, but its better than nothing, although still likely to windmill. And I totally agree about a wheels down landing, although there is that LoganAir service which lands on a beach. As I said, its a movie. And yes, if they'd said 'we landed in Dorset', that would be odd. The blokes being pulled out of Le Havre and Cherborg, fine, but Dunkirk?

                        BTW - I was surprised to find out that the cockpit scenes were in part shot using a gimbled mockup on a Californian cliff, with stagehands moving it around - which is pretty much the same tech as they used for A Yank in the RAF.....

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                          BTW - I was surprised to find out that the cockpit scenes were in part shot using a gimbled mockup on a Californian cliff, with stagehands moving it around - which is pretty much the same tech as they used for A Yank in the RAF.....
                          And for I Know Where I'm Going! (1945). Powell described the boat in the whirlpool scene as "A few burly stage hands rocking the boat on gimbals and another one occasionally throwing a bucket of water at Wendy Hiller". All done with a back projection they had filmed earlier in the real Corryvreckan, between Scarba & Jura, and the Grey Dogs [Bealach a'Choin Ghlais], between Scarba & Lungha

                          Steve


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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Bonekicker View Post
                            And I totally agree about a wheels down landing, although there is that LoganAir service which lands on a beach.
                            [/I].....
                            I thought you might mention the Scottish Beach strips ,but as I am sure you know - they are being operated into known and inspected sand conditions and have been since the 20's/30's.
                            Beach landings into unknown sand conditions however are fraught with danger,below is a pic of a bizarre RAF Bulldog accident in 1976 which resulted in the aircraft turning turtle during a beach landing at Southport.The crew were lucky to escape injury.
                            The big irony of this incident is that historically Southport beach had been used for operating pleasure flights with light aircraft since the 1930's but of course one needs to know the safe areas of sand.


                            XX623 had been performing a training sortie, which included spinning. During one of these spins the crew observed another Bulldog spinning and the crew abandoning the aircraft. They waited until the crew had landed in their parachutes and then attempted an emergency landing on the beach to render assistance. During the landing XX623 overturned onto it's back and suffered serious damage as a result. The crew were uninjured.


                            rgds baz

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