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Unusual certification card - Radio Cab Murder (1948)

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  • Unusual certification card - Radio Cab Murder (1948)

    Hello everyone - I'm a long-time lurker on this forum in both its old and new incarnations. I was wondering if any of you knowledgeable folk can answer a question I have about the Jimmy Hanley film Radio Cab Murder which has been in rotation on Talking Pictures TV for the past couple of years.

    The print they play begins with an odd-looking certification card, which certainly doesn't look like any BBFC certificate I've ever seen. Sorry for not having a screen grab, but essentially it says 'Passed by the Board of Laws' - with an accompanying large letter 'A' inside a large circle underneath. I asked Renown Pictures if it was an overseas print and if they had any clue to where it originated, but all they could say was that it was from an original print. Has anyone seen one of the TPTV screenings and have any idea if this is a UK print or perhaps from overseas? (I thought perhaps from Australia or South Africa?) It looks like something that could have been tacked on to a re-relase of the film, but the lack of any mention of the BBFC is strange...and what is/was the 'Board of Laws?'.
    Last edited by DoubleBill; 26th October 2017, 10:19 PM.

  • #2
    Could be a UK local certificate for some reason not passed by BBFC.

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    • #3
      No, the local councils in the UK only interfered with the BBFC certificate if the film was a controversial 'X' film, such as 'Saturday Night and Sunday Morning' or A Kind of Loving', where some local authorities banned the film from being shown in their area or increased the age of admission from 16 to 18 (as Manchester did with 'A Kind of Loving' in 1962). I seem to recall that 'Peeping Tom'', also passed 'X' by the BBFC, was banned in some areas or given a local ' X' certificate. But Steve Crook would be the expert on that film. There was no 'Board of Laws' in the UK as far as I know. There was no way that 'The Radio Cab Murder' would have been shown in the UK with anything but the usual BBFC certificate.

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      • #4
        Here it is:

        [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","data-attachmentid":41580}[/ATTACH]

        I think it is a Republic of Ireland certificate as The Censorship of Films Act was an Irish statute.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=darrenburnfan;n41578]I seem to recall that 'Peeping Tom'', also passed 'X' by the BBFC, was banned in some areas or given a local ' X' certificate. But Steve Crook would be the expert on that film.[/QUOTE]
          [I]Peeping Tom[/I] was released with an 'X' certificate
          It was re-rated as an '18' certificate in 1994 and again with a '15' certificate in 2007
          It was banned by local authorities in some locations

          Powell often said that his only real disappointment was at the cowardice of the distributors who "quickly sold off the negatives". He said that if he had been able to he would have promoted it by showing some of the bad reviews from the London critics and suggesting that people come and see it and make their own minds up.

          That's a good story, but is it true? In fact it seems that it was shown around the country. Quite a few cinemas on the ABC circuit showed it. It got a local ban in at least one place. The cinema in Reading, Berkshire wasn't allowed to show it. But quite a few others did. It wasn't a huge hit, it didn't break any box-office records, but a lot of people were able to see it in 1960.

          [I]Peeping Tom[/I] was still playing in a Liverpool cinema in 1962 on a double-bill with [I]Revak the Rebel[/I] - it seemed to have got a re-release at one point in late 1961/early 1962. On the US release, the book "Ghouls, Gold and Gimmicks" by Kevin Heffernan devotes a whole chapter to its release in Philadelphia. Heffernan doesn't discuss what print of the film was actually shown.

          Steve

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          • #6
            [QUOTE=darrenburnfan;n41578]No, the local councils in the UK only interfered with the BBFC certificate if the film was a controversial 'X' film, such as 'Saturday Night and Sunday Morning' or A Kind of Loving', where some local authorities banned the film from being shown in their area or increased the age of admission from 16 to 18 (as Manchester did with 'A Kind of Loving' in 1962). I seem to recall that 'Peeping Tom'', also passed 'X' by the BBFC, was banned in some areas or given a local ' X' certificate. But Steve Crook would be the expert on that film. There was no 'Board of Laws' in the UK as far as I know. There was no way that 'The Radio Cab Murder' would have been shown in the UK with anything but the usual BBFC certificate.[/QUOTE]

            I understand that DBF, it was because it was 1948 and thought similar circumstances were going on.

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