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'Daydating' - definition

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  • 'Daydating' - definition

    In relation to cinema exhibition - what does 'daydating' actually mean as in:

    [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3]"'The Victors' fourth newcomer, Shapes big $56,000 daydating the Paramount and Cinema One."

    In context it seems to mean a first-run screening at two or more cinemas in the same region - but an 'official' definition would be appreciated.[/SIZE][/FONT]


  • #2
    Tony

    Does this phrase come from the archive of a certain American entertainment publication?

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    • #3
      Looking at other references to 'daydate' and 'daydating' I wonder if it's something to do with a film being screened during the day, but not in the weekday prime period i.e the evening.

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      • #4
        [QUOTE=Simon Coward;n77861]Looking at other references to 'daydate' and 'daydating' I wonder if it's something to do with a film being screened during the day, but not in the weekday prime period i.e the evening.[/QUOTE]

        The source is 'Variety,' renown for its inventive argot.

        I've found earlier (1920) references to [I]"day and date" [/I]screenings - which seems to emphasise that the screenings occur on the same calendar day.
        Last edited by Anthony McKay; 17th September 2019, 08:57 PM.

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        • #5
          There must be plenty of times that multiple theatres show the film on the same day. Some sharing of the print, perhaps?

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          • #6
            San Francisco July 1920 - to rival cinemas- The Tivoli and Strand both booked the first run of "In Old Kentucky" for the same days and dates - and pooled their advertising campaigns. This was unusual at the time and worthy of a long article. Both were medium-sized theatres near each other, but the combined advertising drew crowds willing to stand in line at both venues during the two-week run. Normally the two theatres would be firm rivals.

            The bigger players in town had more options: big theatres which could obtain high income from short runs and small chains with multiple theatres in town which had the option of transferring films to another venue of an appropriate size for their popularity.
            Last edited by Anthony McKay; 18th September 2019, 12:04 AM.

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=Anthony McKay;n77863]

              The source is 'Variety,' renown for its inventive argot.

              I've found earlier (1920) references to [I]"day and date" [/I]screenings - which seems to emphasise that the screenings occur on the same calendar day.[/QUOTE]

              Tony

              Yes, I though the phrase would have come from Variety, who had a number of words (probably made up by them) with regard to the film industry.

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              • #8
                I've found a reference to "day-and-dating" in a book called Mass Media and Free Trade: NAFTA and the Cultural Industries:


                Attached Files
                Last edited by cornershop15; 20th September 2019, 09:20 PM.

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                • #9
                  Explanation would have been a better word (previous post) . It's mentioned again here in the 16th October 1933 edition of Motion Picture Daily:
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Cornershop

                    So from your clipping I take it that Daydating refers to a chain of cinemas screening the same movie at the same time for a period of time.

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                    • #11
                      Certainly looks like it, Mikey. Does this extract, from the book 'In Theaters Everywhere: A History of the Hollywood Wide Release', help define the curious term any more clearly?

                      All the extracts I've posted are from search results at Google Books, as you've probably guessed.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        Cornershop

                        Yes, I'd say you are correct and the instances in your latest clipping can be defined as Daydating. Obviously, it was an American movie business term that has now fallen out of use.

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                        • #13
                          Cornershop

                          Thanks - that explains everything nicely - particularly the information about amending contracts to allow 'daydating'

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