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Can you name the painting above the stairwell in Hitchcock's Psycho?

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  • Can you name the painting above the stairwell in Hitchcock's Psycho?

    [B]Sorry if it's a bit small. This is the part of Psycho when Lila Crane goes into mother's room at approx 1 hour 36 mins into the movie.[/B]

  • #2
    Sorry I don't know the painting but can provide a larger image, hopefully it should help to identify it.

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    • #3
      Checked online, but can't find anything bigger.

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      • #4
        It definitely looks like something from the Pre-Raphaelite school, but can't nail it down without a clearer image.

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=oddbodjunior;n921]It definitely looks like something from the Pre-Raphaelite school, but can't nail it down without a clearer image.[/QUOTE]

          Looks like it could be Jean-Honore Fragonard. It resembles the atmosphere of The Swing:

          Please, someone help. I'm writing a book about Psycho and this is one picture that still eludes me . . . and as we all know, everything in a Hitchcock movie is symbolic or has relevance to the plot.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by Zulu; 7th March 2017, 02:48 PM.

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          • #6
            Had a quick look Zulu, but can't find anything. Could only find details about the painting that hides the peep hole.
            But i shall keep searching.....

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            • #7
              I Googled it and found this :cool:

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              • #8
                It is the painting in Post #1 and #2, not the one in Post #5 that we're looking for.

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                • #9
                  It has a slight look of Arthur Rackham.

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                  • #10
                    From the image in Post #2, I think I'm seeing a woman in a long flowing dress - that looks like the Victorian era - with her right arm raised above her head. On the right of the picture, in the upper part, there is some detail too obscure to make out, but it seems to be a key part of the composition. Is it something that she is holding in her left arm? Could she be a "mother" holding a baby? Am I only seeing what I want to see?

                    More searching on Google images for paintings of "mothers"...

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                    • #11
                      One of the things I love about a search like this, is discovering things that you weren't looking for. Here is a page about an artist that I now REALLY want to be the artist that we're looking for... but probably isn't. She was an artist that made a specialty of painting mothers and children together.
                      Mary Stevenson-Cassatt (1844-1926)
                      [url]https://www.wikiart.org/en/mary-cassatt[/url]

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                      • #12
                        Who can tell where Hitchcock picked up his ideas. It certainly wasn't after a Google search! But don't you think he might have been thrilled to see what a few words can bring up as inspiration these days :)
                        See the "mother and child" paintings that this page has collected together...
                        [url]http://natasek.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/paintings-mother-and-child.html[/url]

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=StoneAgeMan;n1473]One of the things I love about a search like this, is discovering things that you weren't looking for. Here is a page about an artist that I now REALLY want to be the artist that we're looking for... but probably isn't. She was an artist that made a specialty of painting mothers and children together.
                          Mary Stevenson-Cassatt (1844-1926)
                          [url]https://www.wikiart.org/en/mary-cassatt[/url][/QUOTE]

                          That would cetainly be an appropriate theme!

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                          • #14
                            I don't know about everything in a Hitchcock movie being symbolic or having relevance to the plot.

                            He told Truffaut that this small black and white (horror) movie was more like his TV shows so he used his TV staff. And I reckon this picture is likely to be by an unknown set-dresser from the studio staff.

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                            • #15
                              I thinks it's a painting by Van Mieris called "Susanna and the Elders"

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