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George & Mildred aspect ratio?

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  • George & Mildred aspect ratio?

    Hi,

    Does anybody know if this was theatrically released in widescreen? All of the DVDs seem to be 4:3. IMDB doesn't say for this film.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    I don't understand mate, what are you playing your DVD's on?
    I play all mine on my TV set, (by inserting the disk into the slot on the side of the TV) and if the aspect ratio needs adjusting, I simply use my remote to choose the aspect ratio that looks best; there are about 6 to choose from.​

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    • narabdela
      narabdela commented
      Editing a comment
      Mmmm, some education about original aspect ratios required here.

  • #3
    It's nothing to do with what the TV is showing. Finisterre is asking if the film was originally shot in a widescreen format.

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    • #4
      The TV series was 1.33:1 (the standard television ratio in the 1970s)

      The movie would have been somewhere between 1.66:1 and 1.85:1

      There were very few 1.33:1 cinema releases after the mid 1950s.

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      • #5
        yes it was, see [url]https://youtu.be/dQCpX4JEULc[/url].

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        • #6
          [QUOTE=agutterfan;n91402]yes it was, see [url]https://youtu.be/dQCpX4JEULc[/url].
          [/QUOTE]

          Thanks, but that looks like 4:3 stretched wide to me.

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          • narabdela
            narabdela commented
            Editing a comment
            Indeed. Stretched VHS. Looks horrible.

        • #7
          [QUOTE=finisterre;n91348]
          Does anybody know if this was theatrically released in widescreen? All of the DVDs seem to be 4:3. IMDB doesn't say for this film.
          [/QUOTE]


          We have the same issue with the 'On The Buses' trilogy. On the DVD set, 'Mutiny On The Buses' and 'Holiday On The Buses' are both in 1.85:1, yet the original 'On The Buses' (1971) is still being released in 4:3. This is the case with the first Studio Canal set and the Optimum release which came out just a few years later. I would expect the first film would have been photographed in the same ratio as the sequels - as Narabdela rightly points out, most British films were anything from 1.66:1 to 1.85:1 during that time period.

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          • #8
            Whats weird is that I cant actually find out from IMDB what the films aspect ratio actually was. Although the DVD does same on its Amazon description that the aspect ratio is '4:3 - 1.33:1'.

            Its was made in 1980 (and by all account is abjectly awful), so you would expect it to be in a then current aspect ratio. And since the same company made the Rising Damp film the same year in 1:78, you'd assume its the same.

            As Carl V and others have pointed out, this sounds like a truly rubbish transfer from a VHS release (probably the [URL="https://www.bbfc.co.uk/releases/george-and-mildred-video"]Carlton[/URL] one from 2000), and nobody could be bothered to actually release a better version in the proper aspect ratio. The DVD version was seemingly released in 2003, and they have been selling it ever since. At £2.99, why bother?

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            • #9
              Sorry, I thought he was asking how to adjust the aspect ratio.

              Comment


              • #10
                [QUOTE=Bonekicker;n91417]Whats weird is that I cant actually find out from IMDB what the films aspect ratio actually was. Although the DVD does same on its Amazon description that the aspect ratio is '4:3 - 1.33:1'.

                Its was made in 1980 (and by all account is abjectly awful), so you would expect it to be in a then current aspect ratio. And since the same company made the Rising Damp film the same year in 1:78, you'd assume its the same.

                As Carl V and others have pointed out, this sounds like a truly rubbish transfer from a VHS release (probably the [URL="https://www.bbfc.co.uk/releases/george-and-mildred-video"]Carlton[/URL] one from 2000), and nobody could be bothered to actually release a better version in the proper aspect ratio. The DVD version was seemingly released in 2003, and they have been selling it ever since. At £2.99, why bother? [/QUOTE]

                The only films shot in widescreen format are those filmed in an anamorphic process such as CinemaScope or Panavision (or wide format film i.e. 70mm). Non-anamorphic films were almost always shot "open matte" using the whole 4x3 frame but with the essential action taking place in the middle, leaving the top and bottom surplus to requirements (and sometimes containing mike booms etc.). The film only became "widescreen" in the cinema where the aperture plate on the projector chopped off the unwanted top and bottom of the image and projected the rest onto a suitably masked screen which in the UK would have been 1.75:1. Cinema projectionists referred to such films as "widescreen" and to anamorphic films as "scope".
                When transferred to home video formats, sometimes the full frame was used, meaning that you can use your TV's aspect ratio button to chop off the top and bottom as happened in the cinema, albeit with a slight reduction in definition (as was also the case in the cinema). Unfortunately, sometimes you come across a 4x3 version of a film that should be 1.75:1 in which they have zoomed in to have the correct height, but at the expense of chopping off the sides, a not uncommon practice when all TV was 4x3.

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                • #11
                  Odeonman - I used 'widescreen' in referring to the TV aspect ratio.

                  There is a serious point to the rubbishness of a DVD having a non widescreen option in this day and age. Even in the late nineties, when the VHS version of the film came out, widescreen TV's are around, to the point by 2000, there was a rule for commercial TV that all adverts had to have a widescreen version. But evidently nobody could be bothered to even have a 16 x 9 option in a 2003 DVD.

                  For all those owners of media, they need to understand that we now live in a digital HD or even 4K world (you really cant buy a 40in plus TV in HD, and if you can, and your a film buff, get used to image judder and poor colours). That means that if your supplying a film in an outdated or incorrect ratio, which is SD, then your not going to be commercially attractive.

                  Talking Pictures does its best, and does dig up some gems, but its not fair to leave it just to them, and I know some people have pointed out errors in trasnfer, such as jumbled up reels.

                  I am surprised at the amount of films generally that didnt seem to even have an HD version - and often by major studios. Its only last year that The Heros of Telmark finally got a Blu Ray release, and that is a US version. In the UK we had to be satisfied with a DVD special edition!

                  . An 8K TV set will actually do surprisingly well on HD, but if rights owners dont bother spending money on getting decent versions of their product, they are not going to be worth all that much in the market.

                  Adventures of a Taxi Driver is available on Prime now, for free. Apparently its a pretty rubbish film, and seemingly a pretty rubbish copy (looks like from a VHS tape, according to one comment). Perhaps thats why its free - the films quality doesnt exactly make it something most people would chose to spend money downloading. But there are better films out there, and if you want them to sell in whatever format, owners need to invest.
                  Last edited by Bonekicker; 30 June 2020, 10:09 PM.

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