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Rare Michael Powell classic on YouTube....

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  • Rare Michael Powell classic on YouTube....

    Rynox (1931) John Longden, directed by Michael Powell

    Watch here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-X-sYLf7us

  • #2
    Just one of 80 or so rare films now posted on my You Tube channel. I only post films that are not available on dvd, and remove any if a dvd release is announced. Please check the channel out and look at the playlist "Classic British Films not on dvd" to see what else is available.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by MrT View Post
      Just one of 80 or so rare films now posted on my You Tube channel. I only post films that are not available on dvd, and remove any if a dvd release is announced. Please check the channel out and look at the playlist "Classic British Films not on dvd" to see what else is available.
      Which is your "YouTube channel"? With people using aliases on here and on YouTube, it's hard to tell

      Seve

      Comment


      • #4
        The channel is "eh44returns". The link is :
        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxp...WWOuH--r3Gh1qQ

        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MrT View Post
          The channel is "eh44returns". The link is :
          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxp...WWOuH--r3Gh1qQ

          Mike
          Thanks Mr T

          Steve

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Mr T for posting this and all your other films - -quite a few I'd never thought I'd ever see, and considering most are 25-30 year old off-air recordings, they look very nice! It's folks like you who give me hope someday I might get to see Dark Interval (1950) (and probably be disappointed by it, but at least I would have seen it!)

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Dave W, fortunately my analogue tv signal was excellent and everything was recorded in SP mode which made the quality about as good as you could get from VHS. I also used quite a lot of High Grade tapes which probably helped. I have disposed of about three quarters of my VHS tapes, but still have about 600 most of which have films recorded that haven't yet made it to dvd. Sorry but I don't have "Dark Interval"!

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't think Dark Interval was shown on TV after the early 70s. BFI apparently has 35mm and 16mm prints, but for some reason it's never been available, not even a viewing copy. Perhaps copyright issues prevent it from a wider audience. I wish I had been wise enough to record more stuff off TV back in the day. . .

                Of the films you have up now, The Fake was available on US Amazon Prime in late 2015 in a very nice print, so I guess someone still has the copyright, perhaps Renown? That and many other films disappeared from Amazon in early 2016, presumably when the contract expired.

                Thanks especially for Black Widow and Meet Simon Cherry, two more Hammers I can mark off my life list!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MrT View Post
                  Thanks Dave W, fortunately my analogue tv signal was excellent and everything was recorded in SP mode which made the quality about as good as you could get from VHS. I also used quite a lot of High Grade tapes which probably helped. I have disposed of about three quarters of my VHS tapes, but still have about 600 most of which have films recorded that haven't yet made it to dvd. Sorry but I don't have "Dark Interval"!
                  Mike, many thanks for posting these films on YouTube. As a matter of interest what was your very earliest recording, and what equipment did you use ?. I watched Cardboard Cavalier last weekend, and the TV logo and intro look really old !.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "Cardboard Cavalier' was one of my earliest tapes, recorded in December 1981 from the Southern ITV network in the UK. The very first film I recorded, in November 1979, was the MGM film "Terror on a train" also from Southern, although I no longer have that tape. The oldest one I do have is from December 1979, a George Formby fim "I see ice" shown on BBC2. These early recordings were made on a Ferguson VHS machine with the old piano keys, over the years I moved on to mainly Panasonic machines although I think my final machine on which I made tapes was a Phillips. The very last film I recorded on tape was in April 2003, the Gainsborough film "Easy money".

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Taking this thread back to the beginning, Rynox is an interesting film. Quite a simple murder mystery but with a nice plot twist. It was a "Quota Quicky", one of the films made quickly and cheaply to satisfy the quota requirements under the Cinematograph Films Act 1927. But you can see Mr Powell trying out various ideas that he would later use (to better effect) in his major films.

                      Like the view from the Rynox offices is quite impressive. Nothing immediately recognisable but there's one fairly tall spire and another church with two small spires and a horizontal pattern on the stonework. I did admire the way that when there was a different view in the office from down the length of the boardroom table, they bothered to change the view out of the window so that it showed another angle on the same view.

                      FX hooked the gun to the tree branch that he'd pulled into the room before the final shot, the branch sprung back to its normal position flinging the gun into the London night. OK, so the second gun wasn't found in the room - but didn't anyone wonder why a gun suddenly landed in their garden - or through their window? There couldn't have been much of an investigation, no indication of Boswell Marsh climbing out of the window etc. - but the insurers paid out a large amount of money. And even though Tony Benedik paid it back I think it should have still been regarded as fraud. But I suspect Rynox was a bit of a dodgy organisation anyway. The secretary (Sybil Grove) kept a cosh under her desk!

                      When first released, Rynox was greeted with extravagant praise by the British press. C.A. Lejeune in The Observer famously claimed that "Powell's Rynox shows what a good movie brain can do... this is the sort of pressure under which a real talent is shot red-hot into the world." John Grierson, writing a review in the Everyman, entitled 'As Good as Hollywood', boldly stated that "there never was an English film so well made."

                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        I just watched Rynox. It was pretty good for a film that's 86 years old and it has style. Hard to say who the original distributor or studio was, as the names are cropped off at the beginning. But it was one of the very early British talkies. Probably run as a support originally because of its short length. I'm sure that was Leslie Mitchell at nine minutes in. He later became a well known newsreel announcer.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                          I just watched Rynox. It was pretty good for a film that's 86 years old and it has style. Hard to say who the original distributor or studio was, as the names are cropped off at the beginning. But it was one of the very early British talkies. Probably run as a support originally because of its short length. I'm sure that was Leslie Mitchell at nine minutes in. He later became a well known newsreel announcer.
                          The Production Company was Film Engineering
                          The Distrubutor was Ideal (1932) (UK)
                          The studio was Nettlefold Studios, Walton-on-Thames

                          It was Leslie Mitchell as Woolrich

                          "Quota Quickies" were usually screened as supporting features

                          All available on the IMDb

                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            One of the pound a foot films shown to the cleaners with the house lights on.

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                            • #15
                              I've just found it as a new release in my Stoke on Trent area cinema programme records.

                              REGENT, Hanley, Monday, April 6th, 1932, for six days.
                              Charles Farrell and Janet Gaynor in MERELY MARY ANN (U)
                              also Stewart Rome and John Longden in RYNOX (A).

                              It wasn't shown at the Odeon, Hanley, because that wasn't built yet and wouldn't open until 1937.

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