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Some trouble playing a BFI online video

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  • #31
    Thanks, Nick and Steve.

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    • #32
      I know Darren's problem has been (semi) solved but this may be worth swiping from the BFI Player site...

      How to use BFI Player


      BFI Player is available on desktop, android devices, iPad and iPhone.
      • Android tablets via your browser — you will be prompted to download a simple free playback app called Hook. Please follow the onscreen instructions to complete installation.
      • iPads via your browser and iPhones — you can download and install the app from the iTunes store. Once installed you browse the website as before and the app will automatically start when you press play.
      Once purchased you have 30 days to watch the title and 48 hours to complete it once you have started watching.




      Download the player app and you'll still have the best part of a month to watch the film. And if you are still stuck, then use the "Live Help" button to get an immediate response.
      Last edited by Ian Beard; 4th September 2017, 01:41 PM.

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      • #33
        All's well that ends well.

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        • #34
          Before my times up on BFI player, I have held the inbuilt microphone on my audio cassette recorder against the speakers on my new Laptop, played the first three minutes of THE BOY AND THE BRIDGE and recorded Malcolm Arnold's wonderful title music for the film and that's the best I can do for now regarding this wonderful film. Well, at least I can play the theme music whenever I want. One of my favourite credits on the opening titles of a film has always been "Music Composed and Conducted by Malcolm Arnold". What a wonderful composer he was.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
            Before my times up on BFI player, I have held the inbuilt microphone on my audio cassette recorder against the speakers on my new Laptop, played the first three minutes of THE BOY AND THE BRIDGE and recorded Malcolm Arnold's wonderful title music for the film and that's the best I can do for now regarding this wonderful film. Well, at least I can play the theme music whenever I want. One of my favourite credits on the opening titles of a film has always been "Music Composed and Conducted by Malcolm Arnold". What a wonderful composer he was.
            Indeed, he also wrote the music for the St. Trinians films, but his more serious symphonies are comparable with Vaughan Williams and William Walton. A great British composer. Probably best remembered as the composer of the music and iconic theme of Bridge on the River Kwai, to which various people have put their own words.

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            • #36
              He had a distinctive style all of his own and I could tell one of his scores anywhere just by hearing the first few notes. Apart from the aforementioned The Bridge on the River Kwai, he also excelled in his scores for The Inn of the Sixth Happiness; Whistle Down The Wind; The Inspector; The Lion and David Copperfield. All of his scores should be available on disc by now. but they're not and one that definitely should be made available is The Boy and The Bridge.

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              • #37
                Several years ago I had the opportunity to meet Malcolm Arnold. He lived in a house nestled in the English countryside. A friend and I managed to get there by rail. It wasn't easy to get there as we didn't have a car. He was being cared for by a male nurse and he came to meet us at the station.
                When we arrived late afternoon the nurse explained that his mental health gradually deteriorated as the evening drew on. The nurse said that he was in better mental shape in the mornings where you could carry out a proper conversation with him. The nurse said I was welcome to come back anytime and stay overnight. Unfortunately that didn't happen and he died sometime later.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by darrenburnfan View Post
                  He had a distinctive style all of his own and I could tell one of his scores anywhere just by hearing the first few notes. Apart from the aforementioned The Bridge on the River Kwai, he also excelled in his scores for The Inn of the Sixth Happiness; Whistle Down The Wind; The Inspector; The Lion and David Copperfield. All of his scores should be available on disc by now. but they're not and one that definitely should be made available is The Boy and The Bridge.
                  What a good idea! I'll mention it to Presto Classical, who have already made quite a few compilations of film music.

                  Addendum - 'Tis done, at least in part.. http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Chandos/CHAN9851
                  Last edited by Judge Foozle; 4th September 2017, 09:54 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Stephen Pickard View Post
                    Several years ago I had the opportunity to meet Malcolm Arnold. He lived in a house nestled in the English countryside. A friend and I managed to get there by rail. It wasn't easy to get there as we didn't have a car. He was being cared for by a male nurse and he came to meet us at the station.
                    When we arrived late afternoon the nurse explained that his mental health gradually deteriorated as the evening drew on. The nurse said that he was in better mental shape in the mornings where you could carry out a proper conversation with him. The nurse said I was welcome to come back anytime and stay overnight. Unfortunately that didn't happen and he died sometime later.
                    Such a shame you didn't get to see him earlier, Stephen. He was and still is a British film legend. I would love to have met Sir Malcolm Arnold (yes, we mustn't forget that he was knighted) before he became ill and frail and have told him I thought he was a totally marvellous composer.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Judge Foozle View Post

                      What a good idea! I'll mention it to Presto Classical, who have already made quite a few compilations of film music.

                      Addendum - 'Tis done, at least in part.. http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Chandos/CHAN9851
                      I'm not sure who holds the rights to the film and its music now. As it was a Columbia release, but a Xanadu production, it could be Sony, who hold the rights to all Columbia pictures from that era. But if so, they've never made the film or its music score available for video, DVD, television showings or a vinyl or CD release. Somebody should look into this and find out why. Also, do the original score music sheets still exist so that a re-recording could be made by Chandos? Is the copyright still tied up with the now defunct Xanadu productions and whoever ran it, perhaps the producer and director Kevin McClory?

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                      • #41
                        Press brochure for 'Boy and the Bridge"

                        https://www.nyu.edu/projects/wke/pre...dthebridge.pdf

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                        • #42
                          Thanks ever so much for uploading that, Anthony. It's so very interesting. Although the film was shown at the Plaza, Fenton, in February, 1960, that was two years before I started work there and I never got to show it. Although we had a children's matinee there every Saturday and showed many films for them, mostly CFF films, this film was never shown and I'm sure that if we had have shown it for the children's matinee, they would have absolutely loved it!

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