Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the www.Britmovie.co.uk forum

If this is your first time on the new forum since March 7th, 2017, please re-register with us once more.
Paypal contributions for the care and feeding of the forum may be made here:
PayPal Donations

The old bulletin board archive can be found here:
http://filmdope.com/forums/
See more
See less

Watched Last Night

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stratton (2016)

    awful

    Comment


    • Originally posted by John Hamilton View Post
      Stratton (2016)

      awful
      John that must be the most succinct review we have ever had on Britmovie!

      Comment


      • John Hamilton
        John Hamilton commented
        Editing a comment
        I honestly can't think of a single redeeming feature, Tigon, I am purging it from my memory!

    • Originally posted by Andy2 View Post
      Bitter Harvest (1963)A much better (and darker) film than we see at the beginning, it starts with poor young Jennie longing to escape from the dismal family shop in Wales and make her name in the go-getting world of London. By sheer chance she gets her opportunity when a customer drops in and tells her he can help her to realise her dreams. A bit of a pot-boiler morality tale, but nicely shot in colour and Janet Munro is very pretty and appealing. The film does not end well for poor Jennie.
      A word about the music. The theme is played by Mr Acker Bilk, instantly recognisable by his breathy use of the clarinet. It's a great tune, wonderfully arranged and played and suits the mood of the film perfectly.
      It's difficult to feel much sympathy for Jennie; she can be forgiven for being an immature dreamer, but she's also a liar, a schemer, is out for no. 1 and ultimately is a good time girl slapper with bells on! John Stride is very good as the young man who falls for her, while the sugar daddies, or potential ones at least, include Alan Badel, Terence Alexander, Francis Matthews and William Lucas. Derek Francis plays her miserable father, Barbara Ferris her friend from the valleys and Colin Gordon is another lodger at Thora Hird's seedy boarding house. With a screenplay by Ted Willis and an "X" certificate, it's directed with some aplomb and lots of dizzy whip pans by Peter Graham Scott.

      Comment


      • Operation Crossbow (1965)
        What do you get when you cross MGM dollars, an Italian producer, the director of The Dam Busters and half of the Archers? A massive box office hit in the UK and a thundering flop in the US! What we have here is a good old British war movie that might have come out of Elstree or Pinewood ten years earlier dressed up in glossy Metrocolor and Panavision and featuring a cast of British war film stalwarts with an American parachuted (!) in to boost US receipts in the manner of 1950's British B movies. Like all British war films of the sixties the score is by Ron Goodwin and Erwin Hillier's photography makes full use of MGM-British's best sets and backlot. The story is loosely based on fact and the script displays Pressburger's usual refusal to portray the Germans as cartoon villains. Although they do execute one of the agents for refusing to betray his colleagues, this is more than countered by one of "our" side cold bloodedly murdering an entirely innocent character on the basis that they might spill the beans after discovering the identity of one of the agents.
        Sophia Loren's appearance is entirely superfluous to the plot and could have been cut without problem, as apparently it was in some Arab countries where she was banned. It doesn't help that Ms. Loren appears to have walked in off the street with very sixties hair, make up and clothes without troubling the costume and make up departments.
        The failure of this film in the States was a bit of a mystery to MGM, who thought that it was because middle America thought from the title that it was a Robin Hood movie (obviously forgetting that it was William Tell who used a crossbow, not Robin Hood). They changed the title to the underwhelming The Great Spy Mission and re-issued it to no greater success than before.
        In the UK, however, things were very different. MGM went to the expense of a 70mm blow up print (the US only got 35mm) and it premiered at the Empire Leicester Square on May 19th and played for four weeks, the first 70mm presentation in London that was not a roadshow, playing four times daily at normal prices. It had to come off at the Empire to make way for The Hill, but wanting its moneys worth from the expensive print, MGM cast around for another venue to continue the run. Usually films moved over to the Ritz next door but that was not equipped for 70mm (which would have looked ridiculous on its small screen) and the only other option was one of Rank's numerous 70mm houses. The Odeon Leicester Square was obviously out of the question, the Odeon Haymarket was tied up with a long run of Mary Poppins, the Astoria had just opened Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines and the Dominion was a couple of months into its three year run of the Sound of Music. However, the Metropole Victoria was struggling with Lord Jim, having taken it over from the Odeon Leicester Square and arrangements were made for Operation Crossbow to go into the Metropole the day after it ended at the Empire and stay for a six week run. As the Metropole was entirely geared up for roadshows at the time, Crossbow was shown only twice daily on a roadshow basis in spite of being less than two hours long. After coming off at the Metropole, there was a three week hiatus before the film returned to the Empire for a further three week run during the course of which it began its general release on the ABC circuit on August 29th. The West End was still not finished with Crossbow as it then went into the Ritz (in 35mm) on September 30th for a further six week run, even though it had played throughout London on general release by this time.
        In spite of this enormous popularity at the time Operation Crossbow is largely forgotten today and has never had a UK DVD release (although Warner's US release is region free).

        Comment


        • John Hamilton
          John Hamilton commented
          Editing a comment
          Inspired by you, Odeonman, I watched it this morning and I think you are spot on. Great production values, stoic cast and ripping story, it would have made a great 'B' movie a decade earlier but it all mounts up to a so-so 'A' in the 1960s. Didn't Vernon Sewell tackle the same subject?

      • Though the soundtrack is (or was) available in a double-bill of Ron Goodwin compositions with Where Eagles Dare.

        https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/cds...tion-Crossbow/

        Nick

        Comment


        • Juggernaut (1974)

          Richard Lester's superior disaster movie that sadly sank under the weight of the same years US offerings Earthquake and Towering Inferno.
          The launch of a new liner is beset by problems including a bomber having placed seven devices on board.
          Bomb disposal expert Richard Harris and trusty sidekick David Hemmings are parachuted onto the liner, captained by Omar Sharif, mid atlantic to disarm the devices.
          Their team includes Kenneth Cope and John Bindon.
          The passengers include lovelorn Shirley Knight, troubled Mum Caroline Mortimer and wily US politician Clifton James. Plaudits also to Roshan Seth as a caring Steward and Roy Kinnear as the hapless entertainments officer.

          Comment


          • Unearthly Stranger (1963)

            Another outing from my collection for John Krish's tense little science fiction drama.
            John Neville's government scientist marries a lady who is unworldly and with good reason.
            Made as Julian Upton says for about tuppence ha'penny on a tiny set, with a minimal cast of British stalwarts including Jean Marsh, Patrick Newell and Philip Stone.
            Great stuff.

            Comment


            • John Hamilton
              John Hamilton commented
              Editing a comment
              Super little film. After seeing this, I thought it a shame Krish didn't do more features

          • Shipmates O' Mine (1936). Sentimental melodrama about merchant shipmates rallying together to find their old captain. Another Butcher's Film Service epic with Marius Goring lookalike John Garrick ousted from the singing chores by several others, plus there's an elaborate song-and-dance routine near the welcome end which pads things out even more. Derek Blomfield plays the panda-eyed son who yearns to go to sea and the other semi-familiar faces include Frank Atkinson, Mark Daly and John Turnbull. Stilted performances statically directed by Oswald Mitchell.
            Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 1st May 2017, 11:53 AM.

            Comment


            • Not now, Comrade (1976, Leslie Philips, Ian Lavender etc) We've just attempted to enjoy this on Talking Pictures TV, but it was an impossible task. Sadly, this is what the British film industry was reduced to in the mid-70's, although it gave a good number of fading stars and soap personalities something to do. We enjoy a good Ray Cooney farce as much as anyone, but this isn't one of them. It's one of those 'sex comedies' that became popular at the time and no-one comes out of this one well, although Carol Hawkins does have some fine attributes and was good to look at.
              It's stage roots are very obvious, with people-who-must-not-meet coming and going from various doors and asking awkward questions. The scene following the Russian ballet dancer's release from the car boot is excruciating, you just want it to be over as soon as possible.
              The Triumph Stag was probably the best thing in the entire film.
              Last edited by Andy2; 2nd May 2017, 08:11 AM.

              Comment


              • John Hamilton
                John Hamilton commented
                Editing a comment
                Not Now, Darling (1973) the first in the franchise is equally dire but, one assumes, profitable enough for a spin-off. Thank god, the series died with this one!

            • Soft Beds, Hard Battles (1973). "X"-rated stuff from the Boulting Brothers with an apparently impossible and emaciated Peter Sellers playing six roles. Schoolboy smuttiness, bare tits, bums and farts are dressed up (or undressed down) as comedy centred around a Parisian brothel during the Second World War. Lila Kedrova is the madame i/c and her ladies of dubious morality include Jenny Hanley, Gabriella Licudi, Fran├žoise Pascal and Rula Lenska. They get inveigled into helping the Allies dispose of some nasty Nazis. It's all rather repetitive and the flabby puns in the narration help not a jot. It's no wonder Curt Jurgens doesn't crack a smile. And what Leo Marks was doing writing this is quite an enigma.

              Comment


              • Wonderwall (1968)

                Deservedly obscure British curio which despite an interesting cast, Jane Birkin, Jack Magowan, Irene Handel and Richard Wattis, and a soundtrack (of sorts) from George Harrison at the height of his Beatles fame, manages to be crushingly dull. Magowan is essentially replaying his dotty professor from Dance of the Vampires who develops an obsession with spying through peepholes at Ms Birkin in various states of undress and romantic entanglements. That makes it seem a lot more interesting that it turns out!

                Comment


                • Terror (1978)

                  In the late 70's Norman J.Warren was second only to Pete Walker in cheapo gore fests. Terror is Norman J's and David McGillivray's Giallo homage.
                  Patti Love is the old witch summarily dispatched by the Puritans, who returns to seek revenge on the surviving members of the family who burned her at the stake, one of which grumpy John Nolan just happens to be making a film about the witch.
                  So the usual match of bloody set pieces and ropey old dialogue, but it remains fair fun, including a comedic Confessions type comedy being filmed and death by a roll of celluloid.
                  With James Aubrey, Carolyn Courage, Glynis Barber and Michael Craze.

                  Comment


                  • Command Performance (1937). A mawkish musical comedy-drama from Grosvenor Sound Films Ltd., an early production out of Pinewood. The celebrated Street Singer needs a rest from constant film and theatre work lined up by his manager Finlay Currie, sporting the same, ahem, interesting American accent he used in Rome Express. Lantern-jawed Streetie hides out in the country with tramp Mark Daly and Lilli Palmer and her carefree gypsy family where he ends up singing most of the time anyway. When he's lured back to perform before H.M., a tragedy occurs which only his golden voice can miraculously resolve. A vehicle for Arthur Tracy which is fluffy nonsense and more than capable of inducing deep sleep.

                    Comment


                    • Island of Terror (1966)

                      On a remote island of the coast of Southern Ireland, a team of scientists researching a cure for cancer, inadvertently create monsters that live off of bone.
                      Quite a likeable horror sci/fi, which despite the ludicrous looking monsters which resemble moving rubber doormats, manages to create a fair amount of tension. The climactic siege in the village hall is particularly well staged, with the villagers who include Niall McGinnis, Keith Bell and super extras Jim Brady and Jack Sharp, verging on hysteria.
                      With Peter Cushing, Carole Gray, Eddie Byrne and Edward Judd.

                      Comment


                      • Andy2
                        Andy2 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Ha! We're mugs for this kind of British sci-fi, which more often than not follows the familiar 'bunch of strangers trapped in a pub/church/school/anywhere cheap to film in while marauding spacemen/robots/liquid lino threatens outside'. This one is (just about) one notch better than the usual fare - it even has a helicopter in it! I first heard about this film on a BBC radio review programme in the mid-60's when I were a lad and always fancied seeing it. 'Twas not to be - until I stumbled across it on Amazon.

                    • Supersonic Saucer (1956). Fairly tedious CFF short involving a visit from a Venusian (who looks like ET's granddad in a shroud) who befriends some schoolchildren and after breakfast, they all go off and thwart a crop of comic crooks led by Raymond Rollett (who looks like a hirsute Masterspy from SUPERCAR). Harmless but relatively charmless stuff padded out with repetitive cheap animation sequences.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X