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  • Hot Fuzz (2007). A different kind of police film from The Long Arm (!) as it's very much drawn from the same well of humour as Shaun of the Dead. There's therefore crude comedy and extreme gore as over-achieving police officer Nicholas Angel gets posted to a country town where some very, very odd things are going on. It's still pretty funny, especially if you've had a few drinks, and Simon Pegg is suitably droll as Angel, Nick Frost suitably gross as the constable who becomes his best friend. Quite a star-studded cast join in the mayhem as support or in cameos, including Bill Nighy, Billie Whitelaw, Timothy Dalton, Jim Broadbent, Paddy Considine, Olivia Colman, Anne Reid and Edward Woodward.

    Comment


    • Ian Fryer
      Ian Fryer commented
      Editing a comment
      I rather prefer Hot Fuzz to Shaun of the Dead. It stands up well to multiple viewings.

  • It's That Man Again (1943). ITMA and YHTBT: you had to be there. "The Radio Sensation with Twenty Million Listeners" transfers to the screen and comes over now as very dated and confusing for those who have no idea who are the oddball characters who pop up. Tommy Handley plays the rascally mayor of Foaming at the Mouth who has embezzled the council funds to invest in a London theatre. Shades of The Smallest Show on Earth when the beautiful building he thinks is "his" is nothing of the kind and he's got a bombed-out old dump and saddled with acting students. The fast-talking conman Mayor Handley holds the thing together as the film goes off in several directions, but at least it's decently made by Gainsborough and has Walter Forde at the helm. Forde, however regarded the film as poor, but it's amazing that he managed to get all the slapstick and catchphrases in during only apparently a three week shoot.

    Comment


    • orpheum
      orpheum commented
      Editing a comment
      Can i do you now sir
      TTFN
      Don't forget the diver
      I go i come back

    • Pelican
      Pelican commented
      Editing a comment
      Didn't realize there was a film. ITMA was very funny on the radio (sorry, wireless), partly due to Handley's touch and timing but also because of the various characters who were continually running in and out. I seem to recall Peter Sellers playing small parts, very early in his career. The show was still going strong when Handley died. It was rather sudden, although he had been suffering from high blood pressure.

    • Pelican
      Pelican commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't mind if I do (Col Chinstrap)

  • All Is True (2019)

    Smaller and quieter cinematic outing for Mr Branagh, focusing on the last years of William Shakespeare, his retirement years, if you like, when he returns o Stratford from fame and celebrity in London and reconnects with a family long neglected. Branagh plays the title role with his customary charm, Judy Dench is Anne Hathaway, and the supporting cast includes Ian Mckellen. Gentle and poignant, elegantly acted, it is probably too slight a story to be a successful big screen feature (certainly not multiplex material) but it is well worth catching.

    Comment


    • The Towering Inferno (1974)

      Paul Newman is on fire in this stellar disaster flick as the architect horrified to discover greedy corner-cutting ahead of the official opening of his new state-of-the-art skyscraper. Steve McQueen matches him with a towering performance as the police chief wheeled in to tackle the sizzling multi- storied solfatara once the blazing crisis takes hold.

      Apparently this was the first time a film overcame the touchy protocol for "top billing" by staggering the two lead actors' names across the screen.... McQueen's name appears first when reading from left to right but Newman's name is higher up, thus he is billed "first" if read top to bottom. This practise has been employed ever since, of course, in assuaging fragile egos.

      It's a gripping adventure which I suspect will wait a long time for a TV screening, post Grenfell.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Tonch View Post
        The Towering Inferno (1974)

        Paul Newman is on fire in this stellar disaster flick as the architect horrified to discover greedy corner-cutting ahead of the official opening of his new state-of-the-art skyscraper. Steve McQueen matches him with a towering performance as the police chief wheeled in to tackle the sizzling multi- storied solfatara once the blazing crisis takes hold.

        Apparently this was the first time a film overcame the touchy protocol for "top billing" by staggering the two lead actors' names across the screen.... McQueen's name appears first when reading from left to right but Newman's name is higher up, thus he is billed "first" if read top to bottom. This practise has been employed ever since, of course, in assuaging fragile egos.

        It's a gripping adventure which I suspect will wait a long time for a TV screening, post Grenfell.
        My favourite film of the 1970's.

        It even has it's own facebook page for we fans.

        When I visited San Francisco, I went to the two locations used for the outside ground and lobby scenes of the 'Glass Tower'.

        Excellent performances all round.

        Comment


        • Tonch
          Tonch commented
          Editing a comment
          So Mark.... as I always ask fans of this one: is it a Paul Newman film with Steve McQueen....or a Steve McQueen film with Paul Newman?

      • Originally posted by Tonch View Post
        The Towering Inferno (1974)

        The film was re-dubbed in 2003 for the German DVD release. All subsequent releases on DVD and Blu-ray feature this new dubbing, many TV airings as well.

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072308...f_=tt_ql_trv_5

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Tonch View Post
          The Towering Inferno (1974)

          Paul Newman is on fire in this stellar disaster flick as the architect horrified to discover greedy corner-cutting ahead of the official opening of his new state-of-the-art skyscraper. Steve McQueen matches him with a towering performance as the police chief wheeled in to tackle the sizzling multi- storied solfatara once the blazing crisis takes hold.
          .
          Two more recent films cover the similar ground, The Tower (2012) and Skyscraper (2018). If you like very tall buildings on fire then these are for you, but they lack the charm of the 1974 movie and, of course, nothing can touch Newman and McQueen for screen presence

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Tonch View Post
            So Mark.... as I always ask fans of this one: is it a Paul Newman film with Steve McQueen....or a Steve McQueen film with Paul Newman?
            Now there's a question !........

            As the film is a joint Warners/Fox release, they are both exactly equal as far as billing is concerned, same amount of lines, as much as I like Steve, he was the more petulant of the two, but the chemistry works, which is the main thing..........

            Though their marriage is crumbling, there was good chemistry between the characters of Susan Blakely and Richard Chamberlain, also with Susan Flannery and Robert Wagner's characters..........

            Comment


            • agutterfan
              agutterfan commented
              Editing a comment
              Interesting fact (according to IMDb) : During the 1980s and 1990s this was the movie Swedish TV used to show on New Years Eve, just after midnight.

              As for billing, that's easy! It's a Faye Dunaway movie co-starring Steve & Paul.
              Last edited by agutterfan; 10th July 2019, 02:58 PM.

          • Originally posted by Tonch View Post
            The Towering Inferno (1974)

            Paul Newman is on fire in this stellar disaster flick as the architect horrified to discover greedy corner-cutting ahead of the official opening of his new state-of-the-art skyscraper. Steve McQueen matches him with a towering performance as the police chief wheeled in to tackle the sizzling multi- storied solfatara once the blazing crisis takes hold.

            Apparently this was the first time a film overcame the touchy protocol for "top billing" by staggering the two lead actors' names across the screen.... McQueen's name appears first when reading from left to right but Newman's name is higher up, thus he is billed "first" if read top to bottom. This practise has been employed ever since, of course, in assuaging fragile egos.

            It's a gripping adventure which I suspect will wait a long time for a TV screening, post Grenfell.
            Not seen this for a long time but I think McQueen played the fire chief, not the police chief. I could be wrong.

            Comment


            • agutterfan
              agutterfan commented
              Editing a comment
              No you're right, Steve played the fire chief.

          • Hunger (2008)

            Steve McQueen, the director not the firemen mentioned above, makes his feature debut with this harrowing account of the 1981 IRA hunger strikes lead by Bobby Sands. McQueen is unflinching with his camera and Michael Fassbender’s deterioration is gruesome in the extreme. Tough film to watch, impossible film to like.

            Comment


            • The Naked Runner (1967) I haven’t seen this for over 30 years as it isn’t available on DVD or Blu-ray and the only releases out there are pirate copies. Thankfully there is an upload on a famous video hosting site which has reasonable picture quality. Frank Sinatra plays a character who is tricked by a British Intelligence agent (Peter Vaughan with a brilliant performance) and a German (an equally good Derren Nesbitt) into assassinating an East German. Directed by Sidney J. Furie, it is very much in the style of The Ipcress File and has a lot of extreme close-ups. Although mostly set in Leipzig, much of it was filmed in the U.K. with the bomb sites of Leipzig actually being Paddington. The production was ‘difficult’ with the ending somewhat forced by Sinatra suddenly deciding that he didn’t want to continue filming in Europe and wanted his final scenes shot on a stage in LA - something that the producers refused to go along with so they shot some scenes with a stand-in and re-used some earlier ones. I like this film a lot and it’s criminal that it isn’t legally available to own.
              Last edited by mariocki; 11th July 2019, 07:19 PM.

              Comment


              • A Dark Place (2018) aka Steel Country

                Simon Fellows’ murder mystery with a difference, the leading protagonist drives a sanitation truck and has learning difficulties. Andrew Scott, who has been around for a while but never made much impression on me, gives a wonderful performance as Donald, a perennial outsider struggling to make sense of his own life while investigating the apparently accidental death of a young boy. It’s a slow moving piece, dark and sombre but Scott’s acting makes the whole thing compelling.

                Comment


                • The Professor and the Madman (2018)

                  Difficult subject to make a film of, the men who spent 70 years researching and writing the first Oxford English Dictionary, but this one finds the drama. Mel Gibson, rerunning his Scottish accent, and a hirsute Sean Penn are excellent in the title roles, supported by a splendid cast of Brits, including Steve Coogan, Nathalie Dormer, Eddie Marsan and Anthony Andrews. It doesn’t quite grab you on a emotion level to the extent it should but it’s a nice antidote to the CGI, noise and/or lame humour generally on offer at the moment.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Paxton Milk View Post
                    Mel Gibson, rerunning his Scottish accent...
                    I hope it's improved over the last 24 years.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by narabdela View Post

                      I hope it's improved over the last 24 years.
                      Speaking as a Scotsman, I thought it was ok. Bit difficult to tell which part of Scotland he was from but, yeah, passable. Can't say the say for Jennifer Ehle, I thought she was supposed to be Irish for the first few scenes!

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