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  • Wicked as They Come (1956)

    A beautiful woman from a deprived background uses men to improve her position in life,
    Arlene Dahl (my stars!) is excellent as the stunningly beautiful woman who preys upon men to get rich.
    Phil Carey (very good too), Michael Goodliffe, Herbert Marshall, Ralph Truman, David Kossoff, Faith Brook & Sid James.
    There is an underlying theme about what causes the woman to behave the way she does.
    Patrick Allen has a small role as one of Sid James' card school buddies & his Bronx accent is quite jarring!

    Comment


    • John and Julie (1955). This Eastmancolor production from William Fairchild about the adventures of two children who head for London to see the Queen at her coronation has been described as charming and heartwarming, but to me it's more from the school of twee and sugar with the kind of all-holds barred comedy performances given in the early Carry On films written by Norman Hudis. Colin Gibson and Lesley Dudley play the title characters and on their cute travels, they encounter many well-known faces, including Moira Lister, Wilfrid Hyde-White, Sidney James, Megs Jenkins, Andrew Cruickshank, Peter Sellers and a phone-less Colin Gordon, who of course are all ultimately lovable. Another irritant is Eddie Calvert's fat trumpet theme which cuts in loudly far too often. For seeing London on the day of the coronation, the film is a valuable record, but to me it's not much more for anyone over 10.
      Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 6th October 2019, 10:24 AM.

      Comment


      • Child's Play (1952). More juvenile nonsense, and like John and Julie, a Group 3 Production with Mona Washbourne in the cast, but the difference here is this has no message to sell and is a more reckless, broadly-played comedy, even from the children, two of which are Christopher Beeny and Anneke Wills. Christopher in particular is excellent as one of "The Holy Terrors" whose members include the children of scientists who use a bit of stone from Krakatoa to develop atomic explosions. Getting fed up of that, they move on to manufacturing atomic popcorn instead.
        Nice village settings, a scatty script from Don Sharp, suitably over-the-top performances from the adults (apart from Miss Washbourne there's Peter Martyn, Dorothy Alison, Ballard Berkeley, John Sharp and Peter Sallis) and a cheeky score from Antony Hopkins make this low budget production a far more enjoyable experience.
        Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 7th October 2019, 10:38 AM.

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        • Whatever you've got Gerald must be catching as I too watched a film about children yesterday evening. This being Melody (1971) with Mark Lester , Jack Wild and Tracey Hyde. The story of two young children in school, Mark and Tracey who want to get married. Roy Kinnear and Kate Williams as Tracey's mum and dad. Time doesn't permit me to give a full review apart from saying that it was a nice film to wind down the weekend.

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          • The Lovers! (1972). A comedy of awkward manners in this big screen re-run of Jack Rosenthal's short-lived TV series starring Richard Beckinsale and Paula Wilcox as off-on-off-on boyfriend and girlfriend, being anything but permissive in permissive times. Amusing rather than hilarious, the bonuses are perfectly-timed performances by the leads and super 70s location work in Manchester. John Comer, Stella Moray and Joan Scott are also worth watching as a chorus of parents with well-observed asides at the pickles their offspring get into.

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            • The Lovers (1972)

              The up and down relationships of Geoffrey, a young Manchester bank clerk and Beryl his prime office worker girlfriend.
              Jack Rosenthal's sweet natured TV comedy, makes a fairly successful big screen transfer.
              Richard Beckinsale and Paula Wilcox expertly portrait the nervous couple, never far away from getting their meanings muddled, or meeting the others parents in sufferance.
              And with a writer like Jack Rosenthal, there are always going to be some choice one liners.

              Comment


              • The General (1926) colorized

                I am not much of a fan of silents or B/W films,but - somebody has colourised The General and at the same time has sharpened it up considerably,this version really brings the film to life - mostly filmed within a couple of hundred yards of Buster Keatons Hotel in Cottage Grove,Oregon - he obviously really enjoyed this role,it was a very expensive film to make at the time,he even built a 300 foot trestle bridge just to crash a real Steam Loco through it.Because we love Steam Engines/Locos we have this film on a B/W dvd but it is fairly washed out and indistinct in places - this colourised version is much sharper/cleaner and a lovely version to watch.

                Using - The General (1926) colorized as a google search term should find it ok.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by BVS View Post
                  The General (1926) colorized

                  Sorry, but colourizing fims shot in B/W is absolute sacrilege in my book, and there's no need to artificially sharpen 'The General', you must have seen a poor print previously.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by narabdela View Post
                    Sorry, but colourizing fims shot in B/W is absolute sacrilege in my book, and there's no need to artificially sharpen 'The General', you must have seen a poor print previously.
                    I agree - no matter what, it never looks natural anyway. The Laurel & Hardy DVD collection released by Universal a few years ago included some colourized shorts, and they looked awful compared to the black & white originals. I seem to remember some years ago, can't recall which channel, that showed Alastair Sim's Scrooge in a colourized version. Thanks goodness the DVD is in black & white.
                    Last edited by Carl V; 9th October 2019, 11:37 AM.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by narabdela View Post


                      Sorry, but colourizing fims shot in B/W is absolute sacrilege in my book, and there's no need to artificially sharpen 'The General', you must have seen a poor print previously.
                      Our disc is the 2004 HD B/W restoration on a genuine DVD,some of it was reasonable quality but it was quite patchy/variable - would have looked better on a smaller tv probably.
                      The version I was posting about is the best colourised film I have seen yet(not that I have seen many ) ,obviously done with bang up to date software etc - it really brings the Steam Loco to life.
                      Maybe one has to be a Railroad enthusiast to appreciate it fully.

                      Comment


                      • Citadel (2012)

                        is feral children/hoodies a sub-genre? This is a grim, little thriller is set in a Glasgow tower block and involves one man’s fight against roving gangs of cannibalistic kids. No quite as vile as it sounds, James Cosmo is always watchable, but not a great deal else to commend it. It also made Glasgow look disturbing like the wasteland I remember from 50 years ago!

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Carl V View Post

                          The Laurel & Hardy DVD collection released by Universal a few years ago included some colourized shorts, and they looked awful compared to the black & white originals. I seem to remember some years ago, can't recall which channel, that showed Alastair Sim's Scrooge in a colourized version. Thanks goodness the DVD is in black & white.
                          There is a two disc version of It's A Wonderful Life available and one disc has a colourized version on it ( (and it is awful and painful to watch) and the other disc has the b/w version on it.

                          Although some would say you could turn the colour down on your tv and it would lokk as good as the Original b/w but guess what it does not look the same at all because even though you turn the colour down the colourization process has made it look horrible,

                          For those who like the b/w films colourized are those who will not watch one in b/w .

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post

                            There is a two disc version of It's A Wonderful Life available and one disc has a colourized version on it ( (and it is awful and painful to watch)
                            I agree - older colourisations are truly dreadful - the new 'The General' colorization is much much better using modern techniques

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by BVS View Post

                              I agree - older colourisations are truly dreadful - the new 'The General' colorization is much much better using modern techniques
                              Colorization is still a terrible idea, no matter how "well" it's done.

                              When a B&W photographer or cinematographer is taking a picture, they aren't looking at the colours. They are looking for things like shape & contrast of tone. Adding colours doesn't improve those, it detracts from them

                              Steve

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Metro1962 View Post
                                Although some would say you could turn the colour down on your tv and it would lokk as good as the Original b/w but guess what it does not look the same at all because even though you turn the colour down the colourization process has made it look horrible,
                                No, turning the colour down on the TV doesn't make it look like a true black & white, you're absolutely right.

                                I can't comment on 'The General', as mentioned by BVS as I haven't seen it and maybe technology has improved over the years, I don't really know. But I've always held the opinion that a film photographed in black & white should be viewed that way - as the director intended. Only my tuppence worth of course.

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