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  • Driven (2019)

    We really enjoyed this film - based/inspired around the John DeLorean story,very well cast and acted - especially the 2 leads (Lee Pace and Jason Sudeikis ) as JD and J Hoffman.

    Set in early 1980s California, the story follows the meteoric rise of the golden boy of the automotive industry, John DeLorean (Lee Pace) and his iconic DeLorean Motor Company, through the eyes of his friendship with charming, ex-con pilot turned FBI informant, Jim Hoffman (Jason Sudeikis). DeLorean turned to unsavory activities to save his financially troubled DeLorean Motor Company, and it was Hoffman who was all too willing to lure the car designer/engineer into a cocaine trafficking ring set up by the FBI. Isabel Arraiza is Cristina DeLorean, DeLorean's fashion model wife, Judy Greer (Ant-Man, Jurassic World, War for the Planet of the Apes) is Ellen Hoffman, Hoffman's direct, no nonsense wife and Corey Stoll (First Man, Ant-Man, Midnight in Paris) is ambitious FBI Special Agent Benedict Tisa.

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    • I like the sound of 'Driven', BVS. I'll be looking out for it.
      Meanwhile...
      Strongroom (Derren Nesbitt, Colin Gordon 1961. Dir Vernon Sewell) Well, what a pleasant surprise this turned out to be - a nifty, suspensful bank robbery/thriller that has the audience switching sides as the action unfolds. Derren Nesbitt unusually plays a character who shows a spark of humanity as he insists on going back to the scene of the robbery to prevent the two staff suffocating in the vault. However, I think the actor who plays 'Mr Snape' walks away with the trophy, even though he appears in only a handful of scenes. His acting is pleasingly natural and casual and he delivers his lines without grabbing the stage. Writing, acting and direction all come together in this gripping little cheapie. A really good, tight and entertaining effort from all involved. Shown on TPTV.

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      • Mad About Men (1954). A silly sequel to Miranda (1948) and this time Glynis Johns plays landlubber Caroline as well as her mermaid relation. Caroline agrees to let Miranda pretend to be her so she can chat up the men she fancies, in particular Donald Sinden and Nicholas Phipps, as well as Anthony Oliver on the way to them. No belly laughs, but a few chuckles are generated as a result.
        Margaret Rutherford is also back as Miranda's nursemaid, but it has to be said he overplays her dottiness quite a bit, but Dora Bryan is entertaining as a daft and reckless mermaid. Anne Crawford is the spiteful fiancée of Mr. Phipps and Peter Martyn is Caroline's stuffy and jealous fiancé. There are also the usual performances delivered with ease by Noel Purcell, Joan Hickson and Judith Furse. Irene Handl is screen-billed, but I didn't see her.
        Colour by Technicolor, Tails by Dunlop.

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        • Captain Boycott (1947). In 1880, an English landlord in Ireland increases his tenants' rents unjustifiably and delights in evicting them under the guidance of his devious factor. But the tenants are soon up in, and take up, arms and mayhem and murder follows.
          From Launder and Gilliat, a slice of history with the word "boycott" entering its meaning in English vocabulary. Cecil Parker is again in prime pomposity as the captain with Mervyn Johns as his crafty cohort Watty Connell. With a variable Irish accent, Stewart Granger is the lead farmer and Kathleen Ryan is the girl who takes his fancy. Alastair Sim also sports a dodgy accent as the local priest and the usual Irish suspects are in attendance including Noel Purcell, Niall MacGinnis, Liams Redmond and Gaffney and of course, Eddie Byrne. Robert Donat pops up in one scene with a suspect headpiece as Charles Parnell.

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          • Portrait from Life (1948). Postwar drama about the search for a displaced person dryly narrated and acted by Guy Rolfe. The person displaced is Lidia Menzel, who just happens to have her portrait painted and then displayed in a London art gallery where Guy and her father played by Arnold Marlé come upon it. Guy is off back to Europe to find Lidia, only she's now know as Hildegard whose father is Herbert Lom. Or is he? And what is Hildegard blocking from her memory?
            Intriguing rather than exciting, the film's bonuses are Mai Zetterling as Hildegard, Herr Lom and suspenseful direction from Terence Fisher. Robert Beatty, Thora Hird, Patrick Holt and Gerard Heinz are also in the cast.
            Called the rather more direct Lost Daughter or The Girl in the Picture in the States.

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            • city of the dead (1960)

              I watched the colorised version on youtube which was like a different film visually . The gothic atmosphere slightly lost from the b/w version but i still enjoyed it . The dialogue/visual sync well remembered from past views it offered a radio style distraction whilst doing the dishes .
              Last edited by AlecLeamas; 27th March 2020, 02:43 PM.

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              • Originally posted by AlecLeamas View Post
                city of the dead (1960)

                I watched the colorised version on youtube which was like a different film visually . The gothic atmosphere slightly lost from the b/w version but i still enjoyed it . The dialogue/visual sync well remembered from past views it offered a radio style distraction whilst doing the dishes .
                Personally, I can never understand why anyone "colorises" any film.

                If people really don't like to watch B&W films they are excluding themselves from some great films. That's just their loss.

                "Colorising" never works very well. When people make a B&W film, the director & the cinematographer are looking to capture different things. It isn't just the presence or absence of colour. Adding colour to a B&W film often totally spoils the look & feel of it.

                Steve

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                • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                  When people make a B&W film, the director & the cinematographer are looking to capture different things. It isn't just the presence or absence of colour. Adding colour to a B&W film often totally spoils the look & feel of it.

                  Steve
                  Agreed. Can you imagine a colourised version of "The Third Man"?


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                  • Peter Jackson has come closest with the colourisation process with his work on the footage taken during the First World War, though it would be interesting to see the restored footage before it was computer coloured.

                    The other efforts, excepting those silent films that were coloured or tinted at the time (The Phantom of the Opera being particularly startling) are usually woeful.

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                    • There are some modern techniques for colourising which actually work extremely well,not to be confused with older colourising techniques which were dreadful.

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                      • Originally posted by BVS View Post
                        There are some modern techniques for colourising which actually work extremely well,not to be confused with older colourising techniques which were dreadful.
                        It doesn't matter how good the colorising process is. When people make a B&W film, the director & the cinematographer are looking to capture different things. It isn't just the presence or absence of colour. It's a bad idea.

                        Steve

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                        • In its original black and white, The Net (1953). Almost a science fiction film, with a futuristic plane being tested under extreme pilot conditions. The intertwined personal lives of the staff at the secret base where the craft is located, all professors, tweeds and pipes, delivers a lot of talky scenes, but once we get to the test scenes, there are rather good special effects and sound effects worthy of SUPERCAR.
                          Phyllis Calvert heads the cast with quivering lips and bosoms, James Donald as her husband is more dedicated to the cause of science and Robert Beatty (again!) is head of security, plus Muriel Pavlow with suspect French accent, Walter Fitzgerald with a degree of pomposity and Maurice Denham with even more. No-one turns in their greatest performance, not even probably the best actor in the film, Herbert Lom, but Noel Willman is unsettling as a dark and devious doctor and Patric Doonan shows more skill than usual. An unusual subject matter to be directed by Anthony Asquith.

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                          • Miss Knowall (1940). Another Ministry of Information short with Martita Hunt being a silly sausage by adding two and two and getting five. Most interesting now to see "K. R. Griffiths", aka Kenneth Griffith, in his first cinema outing, as a youth.

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                            • Originally posted by Steve Crook View Post

                              It doesn't matter how good the colorising process is. When people make a B&W film, the director & the cinematographer are looking to capture different things. It isn't just the presence or absence of colour. It's a bad idea.

                              Steve
                              Or alternatively the film was produced before colour film was available
                              We have done this discussion before Steve - we all have our own opinions and likes/dislikes - it sure would be a dull world if we all liked the same stuff

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                              • In The Doghouse (1961)

                                Newly qualified vet London Vet Leslie Phillip's, buys a rundown practice, meets a girl, and foils some crooks.
                                Amiable episodic comedy, firmly from the Doctor, Dentist school.
                                The highlights include Fenella Fielding out purring a lion and a barking Joan Heal.
                                With James Booth, Peggy Cummins, Colin Gordon and Hattie Jacques.

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